reflector


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Related to reflector: Corner reflector

re·flec·tor

 (rĭ-flĕk′tər)
n.
1. Something, such as a surface, that reflects.
2. A reflecting telescope.

reflector

(rɪˈflɛktə)
n
1. a person or thing that reflects
2. a surface or object that reflects light, sound, heat, etc
3. (Automotive Engineering) a small translucent red disc, strip, etc, with a reflecting backing on the rear of a road vehicle, which reflects the light of the headlights of a following vehicle
4. (Astronomy) another name for reflecting telescope
5. (Electrical Engineering) part of an aerial placed so as to increase the forward radiation of the radiator and decrease the backward radiation

re•flec•tor

(rɪˈflɛk tər)

n.
1. a person or thing that reflects.
2. a body, surface, or device that reflects light, heat, sound, or the like.
[1655–65]

reflector

A telescope that has a concave mirror to focus light back to an eyepiece. Isaac Newton built the first one in about 1668.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reflector - device that reflects radiationreflector - device that reflects radiation  
device - an instrumentality invented for a particular purpose; "the device is small enough to wear on your wrist"; "a device intended to conserve water"
mirror - polished surface that forms images by reflecting light
parabolic reflector, paraboloid reflector - a concave reflector used to produce a parallel beam when the source is placed at its focus or to focus an incoming parallel beam
solar collector, solar dish, solar furnace - a concave mirror that concentrates the rays of the sun; can produce high temperatures
2.reflector - optical telescope consisting of a large concave mirror that produces an image that is magnified by the eyepiecereflector - optical telescope consisting of a large concave mirror that produces an image that is magnified by the eyepiece; "Isaac Newton invented the reflecting telescope in 1668"
Cassegrainian telescope, Gregorian telescope - a reflecting telescope that has a paraboloidal primary mirror and a hyperboloidal secondary mirror; light is brought to a focus through an aperture in the center of the primary mirror
coude system, coude telescope - a reflecting telescope so constructed that the light is led to a plate holder or spectrograph
Herschelian telescope, off-axis reflector - a reflecting telescope with the mirror slightly tilted to throw the image to the side where it can be viewed
Maksutov telescope - reflecting telescope in which the aberration of the concave mirror is reduced by a meniscus lens
Newtonian reflector, Newtonian telescope - reflecting telescope in which the image is viewed through an eyepiece perpendicular to main axis
optical telescope - an astronomical telescope designed to collect and record light from cosmic sources
parabolic mirror - a parabolic reflector for light radiation
Schmidt camera, Schmidt telescope - reflecting telescope that has plate that corrects for aberration so a wide area of sky can be photographed
Translations
عاكِس
reflektor
refleks
visszaverõ
endurvarps-/spegilflötur
reflektöryansıtıcı

reflector

[rɪˈflektəʳ] N
1. (Aut) (also rear reflector) → reflector m inv
2. (= telescope) → reflector m

reflector

[rɪˈflɛktər] n (on bicycle, car, post)réflecteur m

reflector

n (on car, cycle) → Rückstrahler m; (= telescope)Reflektor m

reflector

[rɪˈflɛktəʳ] n (Aut) (also rear reflector) → catarifrangente m

reflect

(rəˈflekt) verb
1. to send back (light, heat etc). The white sand reflected the sun's heat.
2. (of a mirror etc) to give an image of. She was reflected in the mirror/water.
3. to think carefully. Give him a minute to reflect (on what he should do).
reˈflecting adjective
able to reflect (light etc). a reflecting surface.
reflection, reflexion (rəˈflekʃən) noun
She looked at her reflection in the water; After reflection I felt I had made the wrong decision; The book is called `Reflections of a Politician'.
reˈflective (-tiv) adjective
1. thoughtful. a reflective mood.
2. reflecting. Reflective number-plates.
reˈflectively adverb
reˈflector noun
something, especially of glass or metal, that reflects light, heat etc.
References in classic literature ?
The lamp had a tin reflector, brown with rust and covered with dust.
Behind the steersman's cage is placed a powerful electric reflector, the rays from which light up the sea for half a mile in front.
Considered as a reflector, it is potent in producing a monstrous and odious uniformity: and the evil is here aggravated, not in merely direct proportion with the augmentation of its sources, but in a ratio constantly increasing.
As the looking-glass was only large enough to reflect a very small portion of Tess's person at one time, Mrs Durbeyfield hung a black cloak outside the casement, and so made a large reflector of the panes, as it is the wont of bedecking cottagers to do.
Ay,' rejoined the actor, contemplating the effect of his face in a lamp reflector, 'but that involves the whole question, you know.
According to the calculations of the Observatory of Cambridge, the tube of the new reflector would require to be 280 feet in length, and the object-glass sixteen feet in diameter.
Maston and Belfast announced that the projectile had just been seen in the gigantic reflector of Long's Peak, and also that it was held by lunar attraction, and was playing the part of under satellite to the lunar world.
The gallery into which I went was well lit by a lamp with a reflector.
Another lamp with a reflector was hanging on the wall, lighting up a big full-length portrait of a woman, which Levin could not help looking at.
How the talk got that way I canna think; but he had out a reflector lantern and a globe, and made it all clear in a minute.
So that I hope I may with justice pronounce myself an author perfectly blameless; against whom the tribes of Answerers, Considerers, Observers, Reflectors, Detectors, Remarkers, will never be able to find matter for exercising their talents.
Greasy reflectors of ribbed tin backed them, making quivering disks of light.