reflexive


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Related to reflexive: reflexive pronoun, Reflexive property

re·flex·ive

 (rĭ-flĕk′sĭv)
adj.
1. Directed back on itself.
2. Grammar
a. Of, relating to, or being a verb having an identical subject and direct object, as dressed in the sentence She dressed herself.
b. Of, relating to, or being the pronoun used as the direct object of a reflexive verb, as herself in She dressed herself.
3. Of or relating to a reflex.
4. Elicited automatically; spontaneous: "a bid for ... reflexive left-wing approval" (Marshall Delaney).
n. Grammar
A reflexive verb or pronoun. See Usage Note at myself.

re·flex′ive·ly adv.
re·flex′ive·ness, re′flex·iv′i·ty (rē′flĕk-sĭv′ĭ-tē) n.

reflexive

(rɪˈflɛksɪv)
adj
1. (Grammar) denoting a class of pronouns that refer back to the subject of a sentence or clause. Thus, in the sentence that man thinks a great deal of himself, the pronoun himself is reflexive
2. (Grammar) denoting a verb used transitively with the reflexive pronoun as its direct object, as the French se lever "to get up" (literally "to raise oneself") or English to dress oneself
3. (Physiology) physiol of or relating to a reflex
4. (Logic) logic maths (of a relation) holding between any member of its domain and itself: "… is a member of the same family as …" is reflexive. Compare irreflexive, nonreflexive
5. (Mathematics) logic maths (of a relation) holding between any member of its domain and itself: "… is a member of the same family as …" is reflexive. Compare irreflexive, nonreflexive
n
(Grammar) a reflexive pronoun or verb
reˈflexively adv
reˈflexiveness, reflexivity n

re•flex•ive

(rɪˈflɛk sɪv)

adj.
1.
a. (of a verb) taking a subject and object with identical referents, as cut in I cut myself.
b. (of a pronoun) used as an object with the same referent as the subject of a verb, as myself in I cut myself.
2. reflex; responsive.
3. able to reflect; reflective.
n.
4. a reflexive verb or pronoun.
[1580–90; < Medieval Latin reflexīvus turned back, reflected. See reflex, -ive]
re•flex′ive•ly, adv.
re•flex′ive•ness, re•flex•iv•i•ty (ˌri flɛkˈsɪv ɪ ti) n.

reflexive

A form of a verb in which the subject and the object are the same, for example, “He washed himself.”
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reflexive - a personal pronoun compounded with -self to show the agent's action affects the agent
personal pronoun - a pronoun expressing a distinction of person
Adj.1.reflexive - without volition or conscious controlreflexive - without volition or conscious control; "the automatic shrinking of the pupils of the eye in strong light"; "a reflex knee jerk"; "sneezing is reflexive"
physiology - the branch of the biological sciences dealing with the functioning of organisms
involuntary - controlled by the autonomic nervous system; without conscious control; "involuntary muscles"; "gave an involuntary start"
2.reflexive - referring back to itself
grammar - the branch of linguistics that deals with syntax and morphology (and sometimes also deals with semantics)
backward - directed or facing toward the back or rear; "a backward view"
Translations
إنْعِكاسيفِعْل إنْعِكاسي
zvratnýreflexivní
refleksiv
visszaható
afturbeygî sögnafturbeygt
sangrąžinis
atgriezenisks
zwrotny
reflexiv
dönüşlü

reflexive

[rɪˈfleksɪv]
A. ADJ (Ling) [verb, pronoun] → reflexivo
B. N (Ling) (= pronoun) → pronombre m reflexivo; (= verb) → verbo m reflexivo

reflexive

[rɪˈflɛksɪv] adj [action, movement] → réflexereflexive pronoun npronom m réfléchireflexive verb nverbe m pronominal réfléchi

reflexive

(Gram)
adjreflexiv
nReflexiv nt

reflexive

[rɪˈflɛksɪv] adj (Gram) → riflessivo/a

reflexive

(rəˈfleksiv) adjective
1. (of a pronoun) showing that the object of a verb is the same person or thing as the subject. In `He cut himself', `himself' is a reflexive pronoun.
2. (of a verb) used with a reflexive pronoun. In `control yourself!', `control' is a reflexive verb.
References in periodicals archive ?
The aim of this paper is to summarise progress in the development of reflexive methods at Catalhoyuk over the past 20 years, and to describe some recent innovations that have used digital and 3D technologies to enhance the original reflexive aims.
According to the study by researchers from the University of Granada, the Barcelona Pompeu Fabra University and the Middlesex University of London, women tend to give more intuitive answers, whilst men respond in a more reflexive way.
The theory of reflexive law views the legal system as an autonomous function system located within society on the same plane as the economy and political system, and offers the opportunity to transform insights from sociological systems theory into new questions for the theory of law.
d] is called reflexive if it contains the origin 0 as an interior point and its polar polytope is a lattice polytope in the dual lattice M := Hom(N, Z) [equivalent to] [Z.
Being reflexive about the conditions and claims underpinning academic knowledge is a defining aspect of critical tourism and hospitality studies.
Likewise) agents are reflexive, capable of reformulating within limits their own identities and interests, and able to engage in strategic calculation about their current situation (1996, p.
At Princess Margaret Hospital, a tertiary cancer centre in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, all PSA results in the range of 4 to 10 ng/mL prompt the reflexive measurement of free PSA as an aid for timely availability of free PSA values when this test may be clinically useful.
Reflexive methodology; new vistas for qualitative research, 2d ed.
It is this dual process of self-reflection as instructor and engaging students into self-positioning within their own sociological learning that we describe as reflexive pedagogy.
Analysis of the alternation between impersonal reflexives and reflexive passives in Spanish shows that higher animacy makes an argument less marked as an object.
Placing the reflexive content in the structure of the act fits better with ascribing perceptions to newborns and animals, which both lack concepts of causality.
The aim of the paper is twofold: to examine the argument in response to Socrates' question whether or not reflexive knowledge is, first, possible, and, second, beneficial; and by doing so, to examine the method of Plato's argument.