reflexive

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re·flex·ive

 (rĭ-flĕk′sĭv)
adj.
1. Directed back on itself.
2. Grammar
a. Of, relating to, or being a verb having an identical subject and direct object, as dressed in the sentence She dressed herself.
b. Of, relating to, or being the pronoun used as the direct object of a reflexive verb, as herself in She dressed herself.
3. Of or relating to a reflex.
4. Elicited automatically; spontaneous: "a bid for ... reflexive left-wing approval" (Marshall Delaney).
n. Grammar
A reflexive verb or pronoun. See Usage Note at myself.

re·flex′ive·ly adv.
re·flex′ive·ness, re′flex·iv′i·ty (rē′flĕk-sĭv′ĭ-tē) n.

reflexive

(rɪˈflɛksɪv)
adj
1. (Grammar) denoting a class of pronouns that refer back to the subject of a sentence or clause. Thus, in the sentence that man thinks a great deal of himself, the pronoun himself is reflexive
2. (Grammar) denoting a verb used transitively with the reflexive pronoun as its direct object, as the French se lever "to get up" (literally "to raise oneself") or English to dress oneself
3. (Physiology) physiol of or relating to a reflex
4. (Logic) logic maths (of a relation) holding between any member of its domain and itself: "… is a member of the same family as …" is reflexive. Compare irreflexive, nonreflexive
5. (Mathematics) logic maths (of a relation) holding between any member of its domain and itself: "… is a member of the same family as …" is reflexive. Compare irreflexive, nonreflexive
n
(Grammar) a reflexive pronoun or verb
reˈflexively adv
reˈflexiveness, reflexivity n

re•flex•ive

(rɪˈflɛk sɪv)

adj.
1.
a. (of a verb) taking a subject and object with identical referents, as cut in I cut myself.
b. (of a pronoun) used as an object with the same referent as the subject of a verb, as myself in I cut myself.
2. reflex; responsive.
3. able to reflect; reflective.
n.
4. a reflexive verb or pronoun.
[1580–90; < Medieval Latin reflexīvus turned back, reflected. See reflex, -ive]
re•flex′ive•ly, adv.
re•flex′ive•ness, re•flex•iv•i•ty (ˌri flɛkˈsɪv ɪ ti) n.

reflexive

A form of a verb in which the subject and the object are the same, for example, “He washed himself.”
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reflexive - a personal pronoun compounded with -self to show the agent's action affects the agent
personal pronoun - a pronoun expressing a distinction of person
Adj.1.reflexive - without volition or conscious controlreflexive - without volition or conscious control; "the automatic shrinking of the pupils of the eye in strong light"; "a reflex knee jerk"; "sneezing is reflexive"
physiology - the branch of the biological sciences dealing with the functioning of organisms
involuntary - controlled by the autonomic nervous system; without conscious control; "involuntary muscles"; "gave an involuntary start"
2.reflexive - referring back to itself
grammar - the branch of linguistics that deals with syntax and morphology (and sometimes also deals with semantics)
backward - directed or facing toward the back or rear; "a backward view"
Translations
إنْعِكاسيفِعْل إنْعِكاسي
zvratnýreflexivní
refleksiv
visszaható
afturbeygî sögnafturbeygt
sangrąžinis
atgriezenisks
zwrotny
reflexiv
dönüşlü

reflexive

[rɪˈfleksɪv]
A. ADJ (Ling) [verb, pronoun] → reflexivo
B. N (Ling) (= pronoun) → pronombre m reflexivo; (= verb) → verbo m reflexivo

reflexive

[rɪˈflɛksɪv] adj [action, movement] → réflexereflexive pronoun npronom m réfléchireflexive verb nverbe m pronominal réfléchi

reflexive

(Gram)
adjreflexiv
nReflexiv nt

reflexive

[rɪˈflɛksɪv] adj (Gram) → riflessivo/a

reflexive

(rəˈfleksiv) adjective
1. (of a pronoun) showing that the object of a verb is the same person or thing as the subject. In `He cut himself', `himself' is a reflexive pronoun.
2. (of a verb) used with a reflexive pronoun. In `control yourself!', `control' is a reflexive verb.
References in periodicals archive ?
Analysis of the alternation between impersonal reflexives and reflexive passives in Spanish shows that higher animacy makes an argument less marked as an object.
To refer to impersonal reflexives and reflexive passives as a class I will use the term arbitrary se construction.
Communicative reflexives are individuals whose internal conversations, about themselves and their projects, are completed or externalized through conversations with others.
She argues that, in many instances, contextual continuity is the product of active work undertaken by communicative reflexives rather than passive resignation.
This is of course not a general feature of reflexives as such, as 3 illustrates for English:
Assessing relevant crosslinguistic data against the background of the aforementioned distinction reveals a surprising fact: patterns of "formal relatedness" suggest a particularly strong empirical as well as conceptual tie-up between reflexives and SELF-intensifiers in their nonjuxtaposed rather than adnominal use.
Also, it has long been recognized that English reflexives in the 1st and 2nd, but not in the 3rd person sometimes can appear without a structural antecedent: (6)
During the experiment, the experimenter scored all reflexives participants uttered.
Haiman (1983) has argued that the phonological weight of reflexives within many languages is determined by the type of verb that they are coupled with.
However, it should be noticed that many body-part nouns in English resultative constructions are more or less exchangeable for reflexives.
In particular, he argues for a central function for the niphal and against assigning to it passive, middle, reflexive, or reciprocal voice.