reformation

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ref·or·ma·tion

 (rĕf′ər-mā′shən)
n.
1. The act of reforming or the state of being reformed.
2. Reformation A 16th-century movement in Western Europe that aimed at reforming some doctrines and practices of the Roman Catholic Church and resulted in the establishment of the Protestant churches.

ref′or·ma′tion·al adj.

reformation

(ˌrɛfəˈmeɪʃən)
n
the act or an instance of reforming or the state of being reformed
ˌreforˈmational adj

Reformation

(ˌrɛfəˈmeɪʃən)
n
(Protestantism) a religious and political movement of 16th-century Europe that began as an attempt to reform the Roman Catholic Church and resulted in the establishment of the Protestant Churches

ref•or•ma•tion

(ˌrɛf ərˈmeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act of reforming or the state of being reformed.
2. (cap.) the 16th-century movement for reforming the Roman Catholic Church, which resulted in the establishment of the Protestant churches.
[1375–1425; reformacion < Latin refōrmātiō <refōrmā(re) to reform]
ref`or•ma′tion•al, adj.

Reformation

the 16th-century religious movement in Europe that resulted in the formation of Protestantism. — Reformational, adj.
See also: Protestantism

Reformation

 

clean house To purge an organization of corruption and inefficiency; frequently used of government agencies. This expression and its noun form housecleaning have been used figuratively since the early part of this century.

cleanse the Augean stables To wipe out a massive accumulation of corruption, to clean house; to perform any seemingly impossible, arduous, and extremely unpleasant task. According to classical mythology, Augeas, king of Elis, kept three thousand oxen in stables which had not been cleaned for thirty years. As one of the twelve labors for which he was to be granted immortality, Hercules was assigned the task of cleaning them in a single day. This he accomplished by diverting the river Alpheus through the stables. A variant of this expression appeared as early as 1599.

clean up one’s act To make one’s actions or outward behavior more presentable or acceptable to others; to shape up. Although the exact origin of this recent American slang expression is unknown, it may derive from the theater; an entertainer is sometimes told to delete offensive or obscene material from his performance. Similar recent American slang expressions are to get one’s act together and the abbreviated get it together.

have scales fall from one’s eyes See DISILLUSIONMENT.

turn over a new leaf To change one’s ways for the better, to become a new and better person; to start fresh, to wipe the slate clean and begin anew.

I will turn over a new leaf, and write to you. (Thomas Hughes, Tom Brown at Oxford, 1861)

Literally, this phrase means to turn to a clean, fresh page in a book. Since an open book is often figuratively used to represent a person’s life, turning to a blank page in this book of life symbolizes the start of a new and better chapter in one’s personal history. Use of this expression dates from the 16th century.

ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reformation - improvement (or an intended improvement) in the existing form or condition of institutions or practices etc.reformation - improvement (or an intended improvement) in the existing form or condition of institutions or practices etc.; intended to make a striking change for the better in social or political or religious affairs
melioration, improvement - a condition superior to an earlier condition; "the new school represents a great improvement"
counterreformation - a reformation intended to counter the results of a prior reformation
2.reformation - a religious movement of the 16th century that began as an attempt to reform the Roman Catholic Church and resulted in the creation of Protestant churchesReformation - a religious movement of the 16th century that began as an attempt to reform the Roman Catholic Church and resulted in the creation of Protestant churches
religious movement - a movement intended to bring about religious reforms
3.reformation - rescuing from error and returning to a rightful course; "the reclamation of delinquent children"
deliverance, rescue, saving, delivery - recovery or preservation from loss or danger; "work is the deliverance of mankind"; "a surgeon's job is the saving of lives"

reformation

noun advancement, change, improvement, betterment, amelioration the reformation of science
Translations
إصْلاح، تَحْسين
přetvoření
forbedringreformation
megreformálásreformálás
umbót
pretvorenie
düzelmeıslahat

reformation

[ˌrefəˈmeɪʃən] Nreformación f
the Reformation (Rel) → la Reforma

Reformation

[ˌrɛfərˈmeɪʃən] n
the Reformation (of the Church)la Réforme

reformation

[ˌrɛfərˈmeɪʃən] n (= changing, improvement) → réforme f

reformation

n (of person)Reformierung, Besserung f; the Reformationdie Reformation

Reformation

[ˌrɛfəˈmeɪʃn] n (Rel) the Reformationla Riforma

reform

(rəˈfoːm) verb
1. to improve or remove faults from. The criminal's wife stated that she had made great efforts to reform her husband.
2. to give up bad habits, improve one's behaviour etc. He admitted that he had been a criminal, but said that he intended to reform.
noun
1. the act of improving. the reform of our political system.
2. an improvement. He intends to make several reforms in the prison system.
ˌreforˈmation (refə-) noun
reˈformed adjective
(negative unreformed) improved, especially in behaviour.
reˈformer noun
a person who wishes to bring about improvements. one of the reformers of our political system.
References in periodicals archive ?
On the one hand, there is what we might call today confessional identity politics, a kind of Reformational tribalism and triumphalism; and on the other, secular, political, and nationalist concerns.
Hans-Martin Barth writes that <<What the word of God says emerges from the fourfold 'alone' of the reformational approach: faith alone, resting on grace alone, as it is given solely in Jesus Christ and attested only in Sacred Scripture>>s.
As I have endeavored to show in this essay, a kind of reformational romance played a crucial role across the long nineteenth century in the aestheticization of an ethic of attachment that arguably continues to shape how modern political subjects in the Anglo-American world view their national sympathies, and that from this perspective the heroic thing--the good that triumphs over evil--is that which preserves rather than destroys.
Spykman, Reformational Theology: A New Paradigm for Doing Dogmatics (Grand Rapids, MI: Wm.
Converting Fiction: Counter Reformational Closure in the Secular Literature of Golden Age Spain.
The minister said that the PML-N fully supported the reformational policies of the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa government and hoped that PTI chairman Imran Khan would not try to get political mileage from federal government's plans to reform various institutions running in losses.
Creating regained: A Biblical basis for a Reformational worldview.
There is no question that the life and the theology of the Augustinian monk Martin Luther were characterized by the strictest asceticism up to the time of his reformational turning point.
58) It is act pure and simple--pure immobility--that attracts the attention of Vatican II reformational zeal; pure immobility that sparks the flash-point of theological and anthropological frictions in the Church; and pure immobility that Benedict XVI targets when trying to interpret and define the role of music within the liturgy.
In Latin America, which was still overwhelmingly Catholic and where most of the countries had become independent in the nineteenth century, the reformational spirit of the Second Vatican Council led to an "ecclesiogenesis," as Leonardo Boff, one of the most prominent liberation theologians, would later phrase it.
It produced "a hatful of reformational proposals intended to move a regressive denomination out of the past, nerving it to wake up and confront the perplexing realities of the present world.