reformer


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to reformer: Social reformer, Hydrogen reformer

re·form

 (rĭ-fôrm′)
v. re·formed, re·form·ing, re·forms
v.tr.
1. To improve by alteration, correction of error, or removal of defects; put into a better form or condition: reform the tax code.
2.
a. To abolish abuse or malpractice in: reform the government.
b. To put an end to (an abuse or wrong).
3. To induce or persuade (a person) to give up harmful or immoral practices; cause to adopt a better way of life.
4. Chemistry To subject (hydrocarbons) to cracking.
v.intr.
To change for the better.
n.
1. Action to improve or correct what is wrong or defective in something: health care reform.
2. An instance of this; an improvement: reforms in education.
adj.
1. Relating to or favoring reform: a reform candidate for mayor.
2. Reform Of or relating to Reform Judaism.

[Middle English reformen, from Old French reformer, from Latin refōrmāre : re-, re- + fōrmāre, to shape (from fōrma, form).]

re·form′a·bil′i·ty n.
re·form′a·ble adj.
re·form′er n.

re•form•er

(rɪˈfɔr mər)

n.
1. a person who brings about reform, as in politics.
2. (cap.) a leader of the Reformation.
[1520–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reformer - a disputant who advocates reformreformer - a disputant who advocates reform  
controversialist, disputant, eristic - a person who disputes; who is good at or enjoys controversy
abolitionist, emancipationist - a reformer who favors abolishing slavery
birth-control campaigner, birth-control reformer - a social reformer who advocates birth control and family planning
Chartist - a 19th century English reformer who advocated better social and economic conditions for working people
civil rights activist, civil rights leader, civil rights worker - a leader of the political movement dedicated to securing equal opportunity for members of minority groups
protester, demonstrator - someone who participates in a public display of group feeling
dry, prohibitionist - a reformer who opposes the use of intoxicating beverages
conservationist, environmentalist - someone who works to protect the environment from destruction or pollution
flower child, hippie, hippy, hipster - someone who rejects the established culture; advocates extreme liberalism in politics and lifestyle
freedom fighter, insurgent, insurrectionist, rebel - a person who takes part in an armed rebellion against the constituted authority (especially in the hope of improving conditions)
activist, militant - a militant reformer
non-resistant, passive resister - a reformer who believes in passive resistance
preservationist - someone who advocates the preservation of historical sites or endangered species or natural areas
Utopian - an idealistic (but usually impractical) social reformer; "a Utopian believes in the ultimate perfectibility of man"
2.reformer - an apparatus that reforms the molecular structure of hydrocarbons to produce richer fuel; "a catalytic reformer"
apparatus, setup - equipment designed to serve a specific function
oil refinery, petroleum refinery - a refinery for petroleum
Translations
مُصْلِح
reformátor-ka
reformator
réformateurunité de reformage
reformer
umbótasinni
reformátor
reformcu

reformer

[rɪˈfɔːməʳ] Nreformista mf, reformador(a) m/f

reformer

[rɪˈfɔːrr] nréformateur/trice m/f

reformer

n (Pol) → Reformer m; (Rel) → Reformator m

reformer

[rɪˈfɔːməʳ] nriformatore/trice

reform

(rəˈfoːm) verb
1. to improve or remove faults from. The criminal's wife stated that she had made great efforts to reform her husband.
2. to give up bad habits, improve one's behaviour etc. He admitted that he had been a criminal, but said that he intended to reform.
noun
1. the act of improving. the reform of our political system.
2. an improvement. He intends to make several reforms in the prison system.
ˌreforˈmation (refə-) noun
reˈformed adjective
(negative unreformed) improved, especially in behaviour.
reˈformer noun
a person who wishes to bring about improvements. one of the reformers of our political system.
References in classic literature ?
There is a superstition in avoiding superstition, when men think to do best, if they go furthest from the superstition, formerly received; therefore care would be had that (as it fareth in ill purgings) the good be not taken away with the bad; which commonly is done, when the people is the reformer.
MR EDWARD NUTT, the industrious editor of the Daily Reformer, sat at his desk, opening letters and marking proofs to the merry tune of a typewriter, worked by a vigorous young lady.
The reformer England needs today is an energetic phonetic enthusiast: that is why I have made such a one the hero of a popular play.
Mawmsey, a chief representative in Middlemarch of that great social power, the retail trader, and naturally one of the most doubtful voters in the borough--willing for his own part to supply an equal quality of teas and sugars to reformer and anti-reformer, as well as to agree impartially with both, and feeling like the burgesses of old that this necessity of electing members was a great burthen to a town; for even if there were no danger in holding out hopes to all parties beforehand, there would be the painful necessity at last of disappointing respectable people whose names were on his books.
They call me old-fashioned now, and I 'd rather be thought that, though it is n't pleasant, than be set down as a rampant woman's rights reformer," said Polly, in whose memory many laughs, and snubs, and sarcasms still lingered, forgiven but not forgotten.
I heard that a distinguished wise man and reformer asked him if he did not want the world to be changed; but he answered with a chuckle of surprise in his Canadian accent, not knowing that the question had ever been entertained before, "No, I like it well enough.
Adolphus Irwine, Rector of Broxton, Vicar of Hayslope, and Vicar of Blythe, a pluralist at whom the severest Church reformer would have found it difficult to look sour.
Certainly let her be as much better placed in the laws and in social forms as the most zealous reformer can ask, but I confide so entirely in her inspiring and musical nature, that I believe only herself can show us how she shall be served.
Colonel Van Gilbert was subtly facetious in his introduction of the social reformer and member of the working class, and the audience smiled.
Section II has made clear the relations of the Communists to the existing working-class parties, such as the Chartists in England and the Agrarian Reformers in America.
To break away from the Church, to doubt the headship of the Pope, seemed to him such wickedness that he hated the Reformers and wrote against them.
Indeed, those who stare at the half-peck of corn a week, and love to count the lashes on the slave's back, are seldom the "stuff" out of which reformers and abolitionists are to be made.