refraction


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Related to refraction: Refraction of Light
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refraction
refraction of light
i: angle of incidence
r: angle of refraction

re·frac·tion

 (rĭ-frăk′shən)
n.
1. The deflection of a wave, such as a light or sound wave, when it passes obliquely from one medium into another having a different index of refraction.
2. Astronomy The apparent change in position of a celestial object caused by the bending of light rays as they enter Earth's atmosphere.
3. Medicine
a. The ability of the eye to bend light so that an image is focused on the retina.
b. Determination of this ability in an eye.

re·frac′tion·al, re·frac′tive adj.
re·frac′tive·ly adv.
re·frac′tive·ness, re′frac·tiv′i·ty (rē′frăk-tĭv′ĭ-tē) n.

refraction

(rɪˈfrækʃən)
n
1. (General Physics) physics the change in direction of a propagating wave, such as light or sound, in passing from one medium to another in which it has a different velocity
2. (General Physics) the amount by which a wave is refracted
3. (Physiology) the ability of the eye to refract light
4. (Medicine) the determination of the refractive condition of the eye
5. (Astronomy) astronomy the apparent elevation in position of a celestial body resulting from the refraction of light by the earth's atmosphere

re•frac•tion

(rɪˈfræk ʃən)

n.
1. the change of direction of a ray of light, sound, heat, or the like, in passing obliquely from one medium into another in which its wave velocity is different.
2.
a. the ability of the eye to refract light that enters it so as to form an image on the retina.
b. the determining of the refractive condition of the eye.
3. the amount, in angular measure, by which the altitude of a celestial body is increased by the refraction of its light in the earth's atmosphere.
[1570–80; < Late Latin refrāctiō, calque of Greek anáklasis. See refract, -tion]
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refraction
Light waves bend as they pass from one substance to another. This pencil appears to be bent at various angles as the light passes through air only; through air and glass; through water, air, and glass; and through water and glass.

re·frac·tion

(rĭ-frăk′shən)
1. The bending or turning of a wave, such as a light or sound wave, when it passes from one medium to another medium of different density. See more at wave. Compare reflection.
2. The apparent change in position of a celestial body caused by the bending of light as it enters the Earth's atmosphere.
Usage The words refraction and reflection describe two different ways that a light wave, sound wave, or other wave can move when it encounters a boundary between two media. The media can be two different substances, such as glass and air, or they can be regions of a single substance that are in different states, such as regions of air that are at different temperatures. Reflection occurs when a wave hits the boundary and returns immediately to its original medium. Refraction occurs when a wave passes from one medium to another and is bent; that is, the wave deviates from the straight-line path it would have otherwise followed. For example, light passing through a prism is bent when it enters the prism and again when it leaves the prism. The light is therefore refracted. Light striking a mirror bounces off the silver backing without entering it. The light is therefore reflected. The boundary between the media does not have to be abrupt for reflection or refraction to occur. On a hot day, the air over the surface of an asphalt road is warmer than the air above it. Because light travels at different speeds in these two regions, we see an image that shimmers because its light waves are refracted.

refraction

The process by which the direction of a wave is changed when moving into shallow water at an angle to the bathymetric contours. The crest of the wave advancing in shallower water moves more slowly than the crest still advancing in deeper water, causing the wave crest to bend toward alignment with the underwater contours.

refraction

The bending of a sound wave or ray of light as it passes from one medium to another.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.refraction - the change in direction of a propagating wave (light or sound) when passing from one medium to anotherrefraction - the change in direction of a propagating wave (light or sound) when passing from one medium to another
physical phenomenon - a natural phenomenon involving the physical properties of matter and energy
birefringence, double refraction - splitting a ray into two parallel rays polarized perpendicularly
2.refraction - the amount by which a propagating wave is bent
bending, bend - movement that causes the formation of a curve
Translations

refraction

[rɪˈfrækʃən] Nrefracción f

refraction

[rɪˈfrækʃən] n [light, ray, wave] → réfraction f

refraction

nBrechung f, → Refraktion f (spec); angle of refractionBrechungswinkel m

refraction

[rɪˈfrækʃn] nrifrazione f

re·frac·tion

n. refracción, acto de refractar;
ocular ______ ocular.

refraction

n refracción f
References in classic literature ?
I had a theory that the gravitation of refraction, being subsidiary to atmospheric compensation, the refrangibility of the earth's surface would emphasize this effect in regions where great mountain ranges occur, and possibly so even-handed impact the odic and idyllic forces together, the one upon the other, as to prevent the moon from rising higher than 12,200 feet above sea-level.
Mary's Church behind our seat, and as the sun dipped there was just sufficient change in the refraction and reflection to make it appear as if the light moved.
It was then ten in the morning; the rays of the sun struck the surface of the waves at rather an oblique angle, and at the touch of their light, decomposed by refraction as through a prism, flowers, rocks, plants, shells, and polypi were shaded at the edges by the seven solar colours.
The last object at which Elizabeth gazed when they renewed their journey, after their encountre with Richard, was the sun, as it expanded in the refraction of the horizon, and over whose disk the dark umbrage of a pine was stealing, while it slowly sank behind the western hills.
It was fitted and filled with looking-glasses at every angle of refraction, so that they looked like the hundred facets of one huge diamond--if one could get inside a diamond.
It is merely the effect of the MIRAGE," said the doctor, "and nothing else--a simple optical phenomenon due to the unequal refraction of light by different layers of the atmosphere, and that is all.
The impressions of objects underwent a considerable refraction before reaching his mind.
Reciprocal refraction was the one thing to think about.
By the absence of refraction in the rays of the planets occulted by her we conclude that she is absolutely devoid of an atmosphere.
Far beyond it, if the atmospheric refraction is not taken into consideration," said Barbicane.
Nothing was visible but the flat beds of mud; the day was not very clear, and there was much refraction, or as the sailors expressed it, "things loomed high.
On the other hand, I used to find Paul Tichlorne plunged as deeply into the study of light polarization, diffraction, and interference, single and double refraction, and all manner of strange organic compounds.