regalism

Related to regalism: regionalism

regalism

(ˈriːɡəlɪzəm)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the principle that royalty have the highest power, esp when referring to church affairs

regalism

the tenets of royal supremacy, especially in church affairs.
See also: Government
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References in periodicals archive ?
These works define the structure of the book and, although each chapter is to an extent self-contained and examines the political, social and intellectual context in which the work in question was created, there are obvious links between the chapters, and DelDonna stresses the extent to which important ideas such as regalism overarch virtually everything.
Two of the major themes that run through DelDonna's book are regalism and the deployment of art to underline the importance of the Queen, Maria Carolina, in the moral and political leadership of the country.
Bourbon Regalism and the importation of Gallicanism: The Political Path for a State Religion in Eighteenth-Century Spain
The regalism of Spain's Charles III intersected with what many consider to be the pinnacle of Enlightenment in Spain.
While the political stance of the Spanish monarchy was decidedly set against the Jesuits by 1767, the case was quite the opposite over the first half of the century as regalism had been employed in order to protect and favor the Jesuits specifically as an order.
ANTI-JESUIT POLITICS, PHILO-JANSENIST CATHOLICS, AND THE RESURGENCE OF REGALISM UNDER CHARLES III
From 1746 to 1754, the work of Ferdinand VI and his ministers was characterized by continuing the reform program begun by Philip V and employing regalism to support the Society of Jesus, their doctrine of probabilism, and the social class of the aristocracy theologically and socially connected to the Jesuits through their education in the elite colegios mayores.
State sponsorship was a pre-requisite for any successful measure aimed at enlightening Spanish Catholicism so that Spanish clergy, whether they were truly <<addicts>> of Enlightened Despotism or simply trying to succeed as best they could with the resources at their disposal, increasingly accepted regalism as a tool in achieving Catholic reform in the later 18th century.
Oliveira returned to Portugal in March 1543 in the train of the papal nuncio Lippomano, who was to try to moderate the outbreak of regalism when King John appointed his younger brother, Cardinal Henry, to head the Holy OBce.
However, it was not until the beginning of the twentieth century, free from regalism and under republican rule, that several Catholic orders established and developed themselves in Brazil.
Each suggests how regalism informed, and in some cases propelled, reform initiatives in areas beyond its traditional sphere" (91).
Still, at times it appears to be slogging through an identity crisis, and this reader suspects that different editorial guidance might have allowed Enlightenment, Governance, and Reform to function either as a sturdy general resource like the studies by John Lynch, Henry Kamen, and Richard Herr, or, conversely, as a specialized monograph eminently capable of distinguishing itself from the thousands of articles and books published on key aspects of regalism, Bourbon reform, and Iberian Enlightenment.