regalism

(redirected from regalists)

regalism

(ˈriːɡəlɪzəm)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the principle that royalty have the highest power, esp when referring to church affairs

regalism

the tenets of royal supremacy, especially in church affairs.
See also: Government
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References in periodicals archive ?
While not all regalists were Jansenists, their goal was the establishment of a national church and the reduction of the Church to the spiritual arena so that it would look more like the early Church, poor with less emphasis on differences between clergy and laity.
At this point even the Council of Castile, the former bastion of regalists, in league with an assembly of Madrid's priests succeeded in prohibiting Urquijo from printing some translations of classic regalist works <<because they diminished papal authority>> (54).
By the reign of Charles IV (1788-1808), regalist ministers would take political authority over Spanish Catholicism to its furthest extent by granting bishops full faculty of authority in the last days of the 18th century.
THE EMERGENCE OF ENLIGHTENMENT, CATHOLIC ENLIGHTENMENT, AND REGALIST POLITICS OF SPANISH CATHOLICISM IN THE FIRST HALF OF THE 18TH CENTURY
The work of regalist state ministers (3) over decades had been designed to take advantage of every opportunity to improve the institutional apparatus of the Bourbon state so that reforms could be effectively orchestrated and implemented.
Thus, as the regalist ilustrados of the Bourbon bureaucracy made inroads for Enlightened Absolutism in the domain of the Catholic Church, they pushed the proverbial envelope, creating controversy through their attempts at religious reform not directly endorsed by Rome (9), and in the process produced enemies and alienated friends both at home and abroad.
Even though the Jesuits were known for their pro-papal stance, such regalist action on their part did not contradict their orderly essence: The rationale for the terms of the Concordat had targeted the ever present abuses of the Roman Curia in carrying out their duties in Spain, and the result of taking these duties away from the Curia would mean more power and influence for those who considered themselves the most loyal and obedient to the pope in all of Christendom (14).
Thus, while the nature of the Concordat of 1753 did not inherently disrupt the unified nature of the Catholic Enlightenment in Spain nor break the alliance between monarchy and those clerics and laymen seeking a more enlightened Catholicism, the heavy Jesuit involvement in reaching it, compounded with regalist acts in favor of Jesuits, did not allow for many political favors for others, indirectly alienating those of Jansenist or Augustinian bents.
Urged by his Jesuit confessor Ravago who supported the acts of his Jesuit brothers, Ferdinand VI instead employed regalist measures to defy the papal response and make clear the monarchy's position against such doctrine considered Jansenist.
In fact, these ministers successfully crafted arguments that Thomism (or the doctrinal school aligned with Dominicans and Augustinians and opposed to the laxity of Molinism) better supported regalist rights, while the Jesuit school excused regicide and supported papal prerogatives over all others.
Having filled clerical posts with various kinds of anti-Jesuits (men of Jansenist, Augustinian, Dominican leanings, or with other reasons to hate the Society), the regalist ministers sailed smoothly ahead with their plans.
Ward demonstrate, Jansenists allied with regalists and enlighteners to implement political and educational reforms that were often anti-papal and anti-Jesuitical in nature.