regicidal


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reg·i·cide

 (rĕj′ĭ-sīd′)
n.
1. The killing of a king.
2. One who kills a king.

[Latin rēx, rēg-, king; see reg- in Indo-European roots + -cide.]

reg′i·cid′al (-sīd′l) adj.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Tory regicidal instinct, never still, was twitching.
6) The plague, which people simply called "death," was not just an unwelcome visitor in the suburbs and the ghettos of the metropolitan margins; rather, in popular imagination, even though Elizabeth's own death was not directly related to the plague, it was vested with regicidal power.
Going further still in his concern for man's rights, Hamilton also condemned the French Revolution, (31) not because it ended a monarchy but because its regicidal zealots brought unrestrained democracy, anarchy, terror, and despotism to the people of France.
In willfully tearing it to pieces, Macbeth effectively hands the murder weapon to his conscience, which, like a "bloody and invisible hand," bears lacerating witness to the regicidal hand that murdered not only Duncan but his own soul.
7) Marvin, 'Albine and Isabelle: Regicidal Queens and the Historical Imagination of the Anglo-Norman Brut Chronicles.
OBlessed with a keen eye for fashion and a stupendously arresting nose, he's both made the top ten in a hit-parade of greatest living Britons and been called a genocidal, regicidal lunatic.
Edel'man's analysis of Levashov's 267 interrogations and all 5,959 of the committee's questions identifies 19 categories of question ranging from the history of the secret societies before 1821 and their regicidal intentions to negotiations between the Northern and Southern Societies and individuals' membership of them.
Smyth's apocalyptic and borderline regicidal "On the Late Attempted Assassination of the Queen," published in 1843, but most likely written in 1840 (pp.
The first was the great Reformation textbook of the church; the second was issued in the first year of Elizabeth Is reign and revised the 1552 edition which was virtually stillborn; the 1662 edition marked an attempt to draw together the church which had suffered so horribly under the Puritans and the regicidal dictator, Cromwell.
Although it is clear she had no involvement in any regicidal plot, Catherine did remain a staunch Catholic and cultivated a public image as a Catholic monarch.
These editions hinted that modern Whigs and dissenters continued to harbor regicidal fantasies.