regolith

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reg·o·lith

 (rĕg′ə-lĭth′)
n.
The layer of loose rock resting on bedrock, constituting the surface of most land. Also called mantle rock.

[Greek rhēgos, blanket + -lith.]

regolith

(ˈrɛɡəlɪθ)
n
(Geological Science) the layer of loose material covering the bedrock of the earth and moon, etc, comprising soil, sand, rock fragments, volcanic ash, glacial drift, etc
[C20: from Greek rhēgos covering, blanket + lithos stone]

reg•o•lith

(ˈrɛg ə lɪθ)

n.
1. the layer of weathered rock and soil overlying bedrock; mantle rock.
2. an analogous layer on another planet or on the moon.
[1895–1900; < Greek rhêgo(s) rug, blanket + -lith]

reg·o·lith

(rĕg′ə-lĭth′)
The layer of soil and loose rock resting on bedrock, constituting the surface of most land.

regolith

the layer of disintegrated and decomposed rock fragments, including soil, lying above the solid rock of the earth’s crust. Also called mantle rock.
See also: Geology

regolith

The layer of soil and broken rock that covers the bedrock.
References in periodicals archive ?
6 U m indicating the contaminated zone at deeper regoliths.
The regolith with a resistivity range of <10 U m is found at a depth of 8 m indicating the contamination of top soil due to the discharge of effluents.
The third survey was conducted in Palayakadu (Figure 4), indicating extensive contamination of regolith from ground surface to 20 m as the resistivity of the regolith drops less than 40 Um.
Rock outcrops or very thin regoliths occurring in the lower catchment on the left midslope element and on the right midslope to interfluve elements.
Occurrence of soil series within the landscape is related to a combination of aspect and slope angle while the depth of regolith is related to a combination of landform element and slope angle.