regrets


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re·gret

 (rĭ-grĕt′)
v. re·gret·ted, re·gret·ting, re·grets
v.tr.
1. To feel sorry, disappointed, distressed, or remorseful about: I regret not speaking to her before she left.
2. To remember with a feeling of loss or sorrow; mourn: "He almost regretted the penury which he had suffered during the last two years since the desperate struggle merely to keep body and soul together had deadened the pain of living" (W. Somerset Maugham).
v.intr.
To feel regret.
n.
1. A feeling of sorrow, disappointment, distress, or remorse about something that one wishes could be different.
2. A sense of loss and longing for someone or something gone or passed out of existence: "We have both had flashes of regret for those vanished, golden people" (Anne Rivers Siddons).
3. regrets A courteous expression of regret, especially at having to decline an invitation.

[Middle English regretten, to lament, from Old French regreter : re-, re- + -greter, to weep (perhaps of Germanic origin).]

re·gret′ter n.
Synonyms: regret, sorrow, grief, anguish, woe, heartbreak
These nouns denote mental distress. Regret has the broadest range, from mere disappointment to a painful sense of dissatisfaction or self-reproach, as over something lost or done: She looked back with regret on the pain she had caused her family. He had no regrets about leaving his job.
Sorrow connotes sadness caused by misfortune, affliction, or loss; it can also imply contrition: "sorrow for his ... children, who needed his protection, and whom he could not protect" (James Baldwin).
Grief is deep, acute personal sorrow, as that arising from irreplaceable loss: "Grief fills the room up of my absent child, / Lies in his bed, walks up and down with me" (Shakespeare).
Anguish implies agonizing, excruciating mental pain: "I pray that our heavenly Father may assuage the anguish of your bereavement" (Abraham Lincoln).
Woe is intense, often prolonged wretchedness or misery: "the deep, unutterable woe / Which none save exiles feel" (W.E. Aytoun).
Heartbreak is overwhelming grief: "Better a little chiding than a great deal of heartbreak" (Shakespeare).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.regrets - a polite refusal of an invitation
acknowledgement, acknowledgment - a statement acknowledging something or someone; "she must have seen him but she gave no sign of acknowledgment"; "the preface contained an acknowledgment of those who had helped her"
refusal - a message refusing to accept something that is offered
References in classic literature ?
I am disposed to admire and respect the 52-foot linear raters on the word of a man who regrets in such a sympathetic and understanding spirit the threatened decay of yachting seamanship.
In Rome, along at first, you are full of regrets that Michelangelo died; but by and by, you only regret that you didn't see him do it.
At present," continued Elinor, "he regrets what he has done.
She had resolution enough to pursue her own will in spite of her brother, but not enough to refrain from unreasonable regrets at that brother's unreasonable anger, nor from missing the luxuries of her former home.
Thoughtfully, for I could not be here once more, and so near Agnes, without the revival of those regrets with which I had so long been occupied.
She regrets leaving the tranquil retirement of this remote sea-side place--she dreads change.
For SOME things only--I wonder what should make you regret it?
I am not only persuaded of Herncastle's guilt; I am even fanciful enough to believe that he will live to regret it, if he keeps the Diamond; and that others will live to regret taking it from him, if he gives the Diamond away.
He was suffering from disappointment and regret, grieving over what was, and wishing for what could never be.
That delightful time, that generous season, that ruling by warm blood, were all very fine things, no doubt; but I do not regret them at all.
However happy you may be, you must regret your freedom.
Finding that I took an interest in the subject, he expressed a regret that the true nature and extent of his enterprise and its national character and importance had never been understood, and a wish that I would undertake to give an account of it.