regurgitation


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re·gur·gi·tate

 (rē-gûr′jĭ-tāt′)
v. re·gur·gi·tat·ed, re·gur·gi·tat·ing, re·gur·gi·tates
v.intr.
v.tr.
1. To cause to pour back, especially to cast up (partially digested food).
2. To repeat (facts or other learned items) from memory with little reflection.
v.intr.
To rush or surge back.

[Medieval Latin regurgitāre, regurgitāt-, to overflow : Latin re-, re- + Late Latin gurgitāre, to engulf, flood (from Latin gurges, gurgit-, whirlpool).]

re·gur′gi·tant (-tənt) adj.
re·gur′gi·ta′tion n.
re·gur′gi·ta·tive adj.

re•gur•gi•ta•tion

(rɪˌgɜr dʒɪˈteɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the act of regurgitating.
2. return of partly digested food from the stomach to the mouth.
3. the reflux of blood through defective heart valves.

re·gur·gi·ta·tion

(re·gur′gi·ta′tion)
1. The return of undigested food from the stomach to the mouth.
2. The food so returned.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.regurgitation - backflow of blood through a defective heart valve
backflow, backflowing - a flow that returns toward its source
2.regurgitation - recall after rote memorization; "he complained that school was just memorization and regurgitation"
recollection, reminiscence, recall - the process of remembering (especially the process of recovering information by mental effort); "he has total recall of the episode"
3.regurgitation - the reflex act of ejecting the contents of the stomach through the mouthregurgitation - the reflex act of ejecting the contents of the stomach through the mouth
ejection, forcing out, expulsion, projection - the act of expelling or projecting or ejecting
rumination - regurgitation of small amounts of food; seen in some infants after feeding
haematemesis, hematemesis - vomiting blood
hyperemesis - severe and excessive vomiting
Translations
تَقَيُّؤ، إرجاع الطعام من المَعِدَه
dávení
gylp
felöklendezésöklendezés
gubb, æla
vracanie
kusma

regurgitation

[rɪˈgɜːdʒɪˈteɪʃən] Nregurgitación f (fig) → reproducción f maquinal

regurgitation

nWiederhochbringen nt; (fig: of information, facts) → Wiederkäuen nt

regurgitate

(riˈgəːdʒiteit) verb
to bring back (food) into the mouth after it has been swallowed.
reˌgurgiˈtation noun

re·gur·gi·ta·tion

n. regurgitación.
1. acto de devolver o expulsar la comida de la boca;
2. flujo retrógrado de la sangre a través de una válvula defectuosa del corazón;
aortic ______ aórtica;
mitral ______ de la válvula mitral;
valvular ______ valvular.

regurgitation

n regurgitación f; aortic (mitral etc.) — regurgitación aórtica (mitral, etc.)
References in classic literature ?
When I passed outside, however, and pressed down the levers which controlled it, I knew at once by the whishing sound that there was a slight leakage, which allowed a regurgitation of water through one of the side cylinders.
It targets patients with severe degenerative Mitral Regurgitation who are too high-risk for open heart surgery and do not have other treatment options available to them.
a privately held medical technology company pioneering beating-heart repair for degenerative mitral regurgitation.
Presented as a First Report Investigation at the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) Annual Meeting and simultaneously published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC), data from the first 50 consecutive patients enrolled in the Intrepid Pilot Study demonstrated successful device implantation and a substantial reduction in mitral regurgitation at 30-days.
1,2 During severe hypoxia cardiovascular disturbances include tricuspid valve regurgitation which is relatively frequent, mitral valve regurgitation that is less common, pulmonary hypertension and transient myocardial ischemia.
It found that higher blood pressure in early life was associated with a significantly greater future risk of mitral regurgitation, a condition which makes the heart less efficient at pumping blood around the body and in severe cases can lead to heart failure.
The findings showed that higher blood pressure in early life was associated with a significantly greater future risk of mitral regurgitation - a condition which makes the heart less efficient at pumping blood around the body, and in severe cases can lead to heart failure.
Despite significant advances in the understanding of valve disease, mitral regurgitation has until now been largely considered a degenerative disorder, resulting from a weakening of the valve over time due to 'wear and tear'.
Conclusions: Weight is associated with ventricular size and valvular regurgitation in healthy Tibetans.
Objective: To compare outcomes of peri-membranous ventricular septal defects (VSD) closure with and without tricuspid valve detachment (TVD) in terms of residual VSD's, postoperative heart blocks, tricuspid regurgitation and operative time.
Mitral regurgitation was diagnosed by the presence of thickened valves, dilated mitral valve annuli, and left atrial and left ventricular dilatation, and lack of coaptation of the mitral valve leaflets in systole.
The cause of mitral regurgitation was rheumatic in all patients, with no congenital myxomatous, infective or ischemic cases.