rehabilitation


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re·ha·bil·i·tate

 (rē′hə-bĭl′ĭ-tāt′)
tr.v. re·ha·bil·i·tat·ed, re·ha·bil·i·tat·ing, re·ha·bil·i·tates
1. To restore to good health or useful life, as through therapy and education: rehabilitate a patient; rehabilitate a prison inmate.
2. To restore to good condition: rehabilitate a storefront; rehabilitate the economy.
3. To cause to be regarded again in a positive way; reestablish esteem for: rehabilitate a reputation; rehabilitate a forgotten poet.
4. To restore the former rank, privileges, or rights of: Under the new regime, party members who had been sent to prison were rehabilitated.

[Medieval Latin rehabilitāre, rehabilitāt-, to restore to a former rank : Latin re-, re- + Late Latin habilitāre, to enable; see habilitate.]

re′ha·bil′i·tat′a·ble adj.
re′ha·bil′i·ta′tion n.
re′ha·bil′i·ta′tive adj.

rehabilitation

(ˌriːəˌbɪlɪˈteɪʃən)
n
1. (Social Welfare) the act or process of rehabilitating
2. (Medicine) med
a. the treatment of physical disabilities by massage, electrotherapy, or exercises
b. (as modifier): rehabilitation centre.

rehabilitation

1. The processing, usually in a relatively quiet area, of units or individuals recently withdrawn from combat or arduous duty, during which units recondition equipment and are rested, furnished special facilities, filled up with replacements, issued replacement supplies and equipment, given training, and generally made ready for employment in future operations.
2. The action performed in restoring an installation to authorized design standards.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rehabilitation - the restoration of someone to a useful place in societyrehabilitation - the restoration of someone to a useful place in society
restoration - the act of restoring something or someone to a satisfactory state
correctional rehabilitation - providing penal custody or probation or parole for convicted offenders
physical rehabilitation, physical restoration, therapeutic rehabilitation - providing help for disabled persons; the removal or reduction of disabilities
vocational rehabilitation - providing training in a specific trade with the aim of gaining employment
2.rehabilitation - the conversion of wasteland into land suitable for use of habitation or cultivationrehabilitation - the conversion of wasteland into land suitable for use of habitation or cultivation
restoration - the act of restoring something or someone to a satisfactory state
re-afforestation, reforestation - the restoration (replanting) of a forest that had been reduced by fire or cutting
urban renewal - the clearing and rebuilding and redevelopment of urban slums
3.rehabilitation - vindication of a person's character and the re-establishment of that person's reputation
vindication, exoneration - the act of vindicating or defending against criticism or censure etc.; "friends provided a vindication of his position"
4.rehabilitation - the treatment of physical disabilities by massage and electrotherapy and exercises
physiatrics, physical therapy, physiotherapy - therapy that uses physical agents: exercise and massage and other modalities

rehabilitation

noun
The systematic application of remedies to effect a cure:
Informal: rehab.
Translations
إعادَة تأهيل
rehabilitace
rehabilitering
rehabilitálás
endurhæfing
rehabilitácia

rehabilitation

[ˈriːəˌbɪlɪˈteɪʃən]
A. Nrehabilitación f
B. CPD rehabilitation centre Ncentro m de rehabilitación

rehabilitation

[ˌriːhəbɪlɪˈteɪʃən] n
[offender] → réhabilitation f
[patient] → rééducation frehabilitation centre n (for drug or alcohol problems)centre m de désintoxication

rehabilitation

n
(of refugee, troops, the disabled)Eingliederung fin die Gesellschaft; (of ex-criminal)Rehabilitation f; (of drug addict, alcoholic)Therapie f
(= restoration of position)Rehabilitation f; (of reputation)Wiederherstellung f

rehabilitation

[ˈriːəˌbɪlɪˈteɪʃn] n (of offender, of disabled) → ricupero, reinserimento

rehabilitate

(riːəˈbiliteit) verb
to bring (a criminal or someone who has been ill) back to a normal life, normal standards of behaviour etc by treatment or training.
ˈrehaˌbiliˈtation noun

re·ha·bil·i·ta·tion

n. rehabilitación, acto de rehabilitar.

rehabilitation

n rehabilitación f
References in classic literature ?
Christie was too relieved at the rehabilitation of Jessie's truthfulness to notice the full significance of his speech.
We afterward had the thing reconstructed, and the owner can have his adventurous lost-property by submitting proofs and paying costs of rehabilitation.
Pittrino was puffed up with all the joy of a rehabilitation.
How could she face her parents, get back her box, and disconcert the whole scheme for the rehabilitation of her family on such sentimental grounds?
Selfridge Merry bore across the room to join them, and it became clear to Archer that here also a conspiracy of rehabilitation and obliteration was going on.
What a difficult undertaking is the rehabilitation of the Civil Service while the liberal cries aloud in his newspapers that the salaries of clerks are a standing theft, calls the items of the budget a cluster of leeches, and every year demands why the nation should be saddled with a thousand millions of taxes.
Rehabilitation Robot Market Description and Market Dynamics 45
The rehabilitation literature encourages assessment of problem solving skills as part of the vocational planning process for those individuals who are felt to be experiencing difficulties in making choices (Syzmanski & Parker, 1996, Rubin & Roessler, 2001, Zunker, 2002).
Because the issues surrounding transition services are so varied and important, this issue of American Rehabilitation is dedicated to promoting a more seamless and effective delivery system for students with disabilities.
Through the Internal Revenue Code Section 47, the federal government offers lucrative rehabilitation tax credits to encourage preservation and adaptive reuse of historic and pre-1936 buildings.
A comprehensive rehabilitation team is comprised of: physician, case manager, rehabilitation nurses, physical therapist, occupational therapist, speech and language pathologist, respiratory therapist, dietitian/nutritionist, recreation therapist, quality manager and/or the party responsible for collecting and monitoring treatment data, activity staff, social worker and, of course, the family/caregivers.
Rehabilitation teams include the physician, the patient, and other rehabilitation professionals whose skills are needed to achieve favorable patient outcomes.

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