reinstitute


Also found in: Legal.

reinstitute

(ˌriːˈɪnstɪtjuːt)
vb (tr)
to institute, organize, or establish (something) again
References in periodicals archive ?
Through lawyer Harrison Kinyanjui, he told the Court of Appeal yesterday that Noah Akala has no grounds to reinstitute the case.
Hun Sen faces a simple choice: release opposition leader Kem Sokha, allow Sam Rainsey to return, reinstitute the Cambodian National Rescue Party, lift his ban on open broadcasting and free speech or risk further punitive action from the United States.
Some European leaders and human rights groups have criticized the scope of the government's subsequent purge of state institutions as well as calls by many Turks to reinstitute the death penalty to punish those involved in the coup.
Then 76 members of the Shoura voted to recommend that Saudia reinstitute local flights.
United Airlines supports the signing by representatives of the United States and Cuba governments of a formal arrangement to reinstitute air service between the two countries.
The EU called on Pakistan "to reinstitute the moratorium and to respect fully all its international obligations, in particular the principle of fair trial.
Republicans and Democrats have vowed to block the change and warned that they are introducing a bill to reinstitute the ban.
At the end of the day, it is the call of the triumvirate stewards of the COA on whether to stay put with post-audit or reinstitute pre-audit of government transactions.
Opposition Leader Tzipi Livni called on Prime Minister Netanyahu to reinstitute the freeze.
Future therapies might focus on ways to augment or reinstitute the beneficial pathways in order to turn off inflammation in those with chronic arthritis, he said.
City may reinstitute plan to make NYC homeless pay rent to stay in shelters [Indypendent]
A new owner can acquire this business for an obvious bargain price, then should reinstitute the normal advertising a promotion efforts.