reject


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re·ject

 (rĭ-jĕkt′)
tr.v. re·ject·ed, re·ject·ing, re·jects
1.
a. To refuse to accept, submit to, believe, or make use of: He rejected their version of what happened. The store rejected the merchandise because it was damaged. See Synonyms at refuse1.
b. To refuse to consider or grant; deny: The manager rejected all requests for time off. The college rejected the student's application.
2.
a. To turn down (an applicant, as for a job); refuse to accept.
b. To refuse to accept (someone) as a lover, spouse, or friend; rebuff.
c. To refuse to give sufficient parental affection or care to (a child or young animal).
3. To spit out or vomit: The baby rejected the medicine.
4. Medicine To react to the introduction of (a transplanted organ or tissue) with a destructive immune response; fail to accept as part of one's own body.
n. (rē′jĕkt)
1. One that has been rejected: a reject from the varsity team; a tire that is a reject.
2. Slang A foolish or socially inept person.

[Middle English rejecten, from Latin rēicere, rēiect- : re-, re- + iacere, to throw; see yē- in Indo-European roots.]

re·ject′er, re·jec′tor n.
re·jec′tion (-jĕk′shən) adj.
re·jec′tive adj.

reject

vb (tr)
1. to refuse to accept, acknowledge, use, believe, etc
2. to throw out as useless or worthless; discard
3. to rebuff (a person)
4. (Medicine) (of an organism) to fail to accept (a foreign tissue graft or organ transplant) because of immunological incompatibility
n
something rejected as imperfect, unsatisfactory, or useless
[C15: from Latin rēicere to throw back, from re- + jacere to hurl]
reˈjectable adj
reˈjecter, reˈjector n
reˈjection n
reˈjective adj

re•ject

(v. rɪˈdʒɛkt; n. ˈri dʒɛkt)

v.t.
1. to refuse to have, take, use, recognize, etc.: to reject a job offer.
2. to refuse to grant (a request, demand, etc.); deny.
3. to refuse to accept or admit; rebuff: The other children rejected him.
4. to discard as useless or unsatisfactory.
5. to eject; vomit.
6. to cast out or off.
7. to have an immunological reaction against (a transplanted organ or grafted tissue).
n.
8. something or someone that is rejected, as an imperfect or unwanted article.
[1485–95; (v.) < Latin rējectus, past participle of rējicere to throw back =re- re- + -jicere, comb. form of jacere to throw]
re•ject′er, n.
re•jec′tion, n.
re•jec′tive, adj.
syn: See refuse1.

reject

  • discard - First meant "throw out or reject a card from a hand."
  • eighty-six - "Reject, discard"—may be rhyming slang for "nix."
  • quash - From Latin quatere, "shake," it generally means "reject as invalid, especially by legal procedure," or "put an end to; suppress."
  • reprove - To reject or express disapproval of something.

reject


Past participle: rejected
Gerund: rejecting

Imperative
reject
reject
Present
I reject
you reject
he/she/it rejects
we reject
you reject
they reject
Preterite
I rejected
you rejected
he/she/it rejected
we rejected
you rejected
they rejected
Present Continuous
I am rejecting
you are rejecting
he/she/it is rejecting
we are rejecting
you are rejecting
they are rejecting
Present Perfect
I have rejected
you have rejected
he/she/it has rejected
we have rejected
you have rejected
they have rejected
Past Continuous
I was rejecting
you were rejecting
he/she/it was rejecting
we were rejecting
you were rejecting
they were rejecting
Past Perfect
I had rejected
you had rejected
he/she/it had rejected
we had rejected
you had rejected
they had rejected
Future
I will reject
you will reject
he/she/it will reject
we will reject
you will reject
they will reject
Future Perfect
I will have rejected
you will have rejected
he/she/it will have rejected
we will have rejected
you will have rejected
they will have rejected
Future Continuous
I will be rejecting
you will be rejecting
he/she/it will be rejecting
we will be rejecting
you will be rejecting
they will be rejecting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been rejecting
you have been rejecting
he/she/it has been rejecting
we have been rejecting
you have been rejecting
they have been rejecting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been rejecting
you will have been rejecting
he/she/it will have been rejecting
we will have been rejecting
you will have been rejecting
they will have been rejecting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been rejecting
you had been rejecting
he/she/it had been rejecting
we had been rejecting
you had been rejecting
they had been rejecting
Conditional
I would reject
you would reject
he/she/it would reject
we would reject
you would reject
they would reject
Past Conditional
I would have rejected
you would have rejected
he/she/it would have rejected
we would have rejected
you would have rejected
they would have rejected
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reject - the person or thing that is rejected or set aside as inferior in qualityreject - the person or thing that is rejected or set aside as inferior in quality
deciding, decision making - the cognitive process of reaching a decision; "a good executive must be good at decision making"
Verb1.reject - refuse to accept or acknowledge; "I reject the idea of starting a war"; "The journal rejected the student's paper"
pass judgment, evaluate, judge - form a critical opinion of; "I cannot judge some works of modern art"; "How do you evaluate this grant proposal?" "We shouldn't pass judgment on other people"
disbelieve, discredit - reject as false; refuse to accept
repudiate - refuse to acknowledge, ratify, or recognize as valid; "The woman repudiated the divorce settlement"
recuse - challenge or except to a judge as being incompetent or interested, in canon and civil law
reprobate - reject (documents) as invalid
repudiate, disown, renounce - cast off; "She renounced her husband"; "The parents repudiated their son"
brush aside, brush off, discount, dismiss, disregard, ignore, push aside - bar from attention or consideration; "She dismissed his advances"
accept - consider or hold as true; "I cannot accept the dogma of this church"; "accept an argument"
2.reject - refuse to acceptreject - refuse to accept; "He refused my offer of hospitality"
freeze off, spurn, pooh-pooh, disdain, scorn, turn down, reject - reject with contempt; "She spurned his advances"
dishonor, dishonour - refuse to accept; "dishonor checks and drafts"
bounce - refuse to accept and send back; "bounce a check"
3.reject - deem wrong or inappropriate; "I disapprove of her child rearing methods"
pass judgment, evaluate, judge - form a critical opinion of; "I cannot judge some works of modern art"; "How do you evaluate this grant proposal?" "We shouldn't pass judgment on other people"
object - express or raise an objection or protest or criticism or express dissent; "She never objected to the amount of work her boss charged her with"; "When asked to drive the truck, she objected that she did not have a driver's license"
deprecate - express strong disapproval of; deplore
deter, discourage - try to prevent; show opposition to; "We should discourage this practice among our youth"
4.reject - reject with contemptreject - reject with contempt; "She spurned his advances"
refuse, decline - show unwillingness towards; "he declined to join the group on a hike"
rebuff, snub, repel - reject outright and bluntly; "She snubbed his proposal"
pass up, turn down, decline, refuse, reject - refuse to accept; "He refused my offer of hospitality"
turn down, turn away, refuse, reject - refuse entrance or membership; "They turned away hundreds of fans"; "Black people were often rejected by country clubs"
5.reject - resist immunologically the introduction of some foreign tissue or organ; "His body rejected the liver of the donor"
react, respond - show a response or a reaction to something
6.reject - refuse entrance or membershipreject - refuse entrance or membership; "They turned away hundreds of fans"; "Black people were often rejected by country clubs"
freeze off, spurn, pooh-pooh, disdain, scorn, turn down, reject - reject with contempt; "She spurned his advances"
allow in, intromit, let in, admit - allow to enter; grant entry to; "We cannot admit non-members into our club building"; "This pipe admits air"
7.reject - dismiss from consideration or a contest; "John was ruled out as a possible suspect because he had a strong alibi"; "This possibility can be eliminated from our consideration"

reject

verb
1. rebuff, drop, jilt, desert, turn down, ditch (slang), break with, spurn, refuse, say no to, repulse, throw over people who have been rejected by their lovers
rebuff accept
2. deny, decline, abandon, exclude, veto, discard, relinquish, renounce, spurn, eschew, leave off, throw off, disallow, forsake, retract, repudiate, cast off, disown, forgo, disclaim, forswear, swear off, wash your hands of They are rejecting the values on which Thatcherism was built.
deny allow, agree, accept, approve, permit
3. discard, decline, eliminate, scrap, bin, jettison, cast aside, throw away or out Seventeen publishers rejected the manuscript.
discard receive, accept, select
noun
1. castoff, second, discard, flotsam, clunker (informal) a hat that looks like a reject from an army patrol
castoff prize, treasure
2. failure, has-been, loser, flop, also-ran, dud, dropout, non-starter, saddo (Brit. slang), castoff I'm an outsider, a reject, a social failure. a reject of Real Madrid

reject

verb
1. To be unwilling to accept, consider, or receive:
Slang: nix.
Idiom: turn thumbs down on.
2. To refuse to recognize or acknowledge:
Translations
شَيء مَرْفوضيَرْفُضيَرْفُضُ
odmítnoutvrácené zboží
afvisekassering
torjua
odbiti
elvetkilökselejtvisszautasít
gölluî varahafna, afòakka
拒否する
거절하다
išbrokuotas gaminys
atteiktbrāķisnoraidīt
vrátený tovar
zavrniti
avvisa
ปฏิเสธ
reddetmekhatalı ürün
bác bỏ

reject

[rɪˈdʒekt]
A. VT
1. (= refuse, turn down) [+ application] (for job) → rechazar; (for asylum, citizenship) → denegar, rechazar; [+ candidate, offer, manuscript, sb's advances] → rechazar; [+ bad coin, damaged goods] → rechazar, no aceptar; [+ plea] → ignorar, hacer caso omiso de
2. (= dismiss) [+ suggestion, possibility, solution] → descartar, rechazar; [+ motion, plan, proposal] → rechazar; [+ argument] → rechazar, no aceptar; [+ accusation] → negar
the proposal was rejected by a narrow marginla propuesta fue rechazada por un escaso margen
she rejected accusations thatnegó las acusaciones de que ...
3. (= disown) [+ person] → rechazar
to feel rejected (emotionally) → sentirse rechazado; (socially) → sentirse marginado, sentirse rechazado
4. (Med) [+ food, tissue, new organ] [body] → rechazar
B. [ˈriːdʒekt] N
1. (= person) society's rejectslos marginados de la sociedad
2. (= unwanted thing) → desecho m
3. (Comm) (= product) → artículo m defectuoso
C. [ˈriːdʒekt] CPD (Comm, Ind) [goods] → defectuoso

reject

[rɪˈdʒɛkt]
vt
(= refuse) [+ offer, bid, proposal] → rejeter; [+ appeal, application, request] → rejeter
His request for asylum was rejected → Sa demande d'asile a été rejetée.
Many publishers rejected the manuscript → De nombreux éditeurs ont rejeté le manuscrit.
(= not choose) [+ person, candidate] → rejeter
I applied but they rejected me → J'ai posé ma candidature mais ils m'ont rejetée.
(= leave) [+ lover] → abandonner
(= dismiss) [+ idea, suggestion, claim] → rejeter
We rejected that idea straight away → Nous avons immédiatement rejeté cette idée.
[machine] [+ coin, credit card] → rejeter
(MEDICINE) [+ organ] → rejeter
[+ substandard goods] → mettre au rebut
[ˈriːdʒɛkt] n
(= substandard product) → article m de rebut
(= person)
Their players were all rejects from other teams → Leurs joueurs avaient tous été rejetés par les autres équipes.

reject

vt
damaged goods etc (customer) → ablehnen, zurückweisen; (maker, producer) → aussortieren, ausscheiden
(= turn down) application, request etcablehnen; (stronger) → abweisen, zurückweisen; candidate (through vote) → durchfallen lassen; suitor, advancesabweisen, zurückweisen; offerablehnen, ausschlagen; criticismzurückweisen; pleazurückweisen, abschlagen; idea, possibilityverwerfen
(Med) drugnicht vertragen, ablehnen; transplantabstoßen; (stomach) foodverweigern
n (Comm) → Ausschuss m no pl; reject goodsAusschussware f; although this jacket’s a rejectobwohl dieses Jackett zweite Wahl ist, …; society’s rejectsdie Ausgestoßenen pl

reject

[n ˈriːdʒɛkt; vb rɪˈdʒɛkt]
1. n (person, thing, also) (Comm) → scarto
2. vt (offer) → rifiutare, respingere; (applicant) → scartare, respingere; (subj, body, food) → rifiutare
the patient's body rejected the new organ → il paziente ha avuto una crisi di rigetto
to feel rejected → sentirsi respinto/a

reject

(rəˈdʒekt) verb
to refuse to accept. She rejected his offer of help; He asked her to marry him, but she rejected him.
(ˈriːdʒekt) noun
something that is rejected because it is faulty etc.
reˈjection (-ʃən) noun
(an) act of rejecting.

reject

يَرْفُضُ odmítnout afvise zurückweisen απορρίπτω rechazar torjua rejeter odbiti rifiutare 拒否する 거절하다 afwijzen forkaste odrzucić rejeitar отклонять avvisa ปฏิเสธ reddetmek bác bỏ 拒绝

reject

n. rechazar, rehusar.

reject

vt rechazar
References in classic literature ?
Any one whose disposition leads him to attach more weight to unexplained difficulties than to the explanation of a certain number of facts will certainly reject my theory.
They admit variation as a vera causa in one case, they arbitrarily reject it in another, without assigning any distinction in the two cases.
That Hesiod was of this opinion very many writers affirm who were earlier than the critic Aristophanes; for he was the first to reject the "Precepts", in which book this maxim occurs, as a work of that poet.
They may defeat one choice of the Executive, and oblige him to make another; but they cannot themselves CHOOSE -- they can only ratify or reject the choice of the President.
If my Spaceland Patrons have grasped this general conception, so far as to conceive the possibility of it and not to reject my account as altogether incredible -- I shall have attained all I can reasonably expect.
Collins, with a formal wave of the hand, "that it is usual with young ladies to reject the addresses of the man whom they secretly mean to accept, when he first applies for their favour; and that sometimes the refusal is repeated a second, or even a third time.
Your words imply dishonour, and I reject them with the scorn they merit.
I will venture to add that to me the convention mode seems preferable, in that it allows amendments to originate with the people themselves, instead of only permitting them to take or reject propositions originated by others not especially chosen for the purpose, and which might not be precisely such as they would wish to either accept or refuse.
In so far, therefore, as Stout's theory of introspection rests upon this assumption, we are compelled to reject it.
I had long before remarked that, in relation to practice, it is sometimes necessary to adopt, as if above doubt, opinions which we discern to be highly uncertain, as has been already said; but as I then desired to give my attention solely to the search after truth, I thought that a procedure exactly the opposite was called for, and that I ought to reject as absolutely false all opinions in regard to which I could suppose the least ground for doubt, in order to ascertain whether after that there remained aught in my belief that was wholly indubitable.
No more can it be explained than can a human explain why, at luncheon to-day, he selects green peas and rejects string beans, when only yesterday he elected to choose string beans and to reject green peas.
Modern history, in theory, rejects both these principles.