rejected


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re·ject

 (rĭ-jĕkt′)
tr.v. re·ject·ed, re·ject·ing, re·jects
1.
a. To refuse to accept, submit to, believe, or make use of: He rejected their version of what happened. The store rejected the merchandise because it was damaged. See Synonyms at refuse1.
b. To refuse to consider or grant; deny: The manager rejected all requests for time off. The college rejected the student's application.
2.
a. To turn down (an applicant, as for a job); refuse to accept.
b. To refuse to accept (someone) as a lover, spouse, or friend; rebuff.
c. To refuse to give sufficient parental affection or care to (a child or young animal).
3. To spit out or vomit: The baby rejected the medicine.
4. Medicine To react to the introduction of (a transplanted organ or tissue) with a destructive immune response; fail to accept as part of one's own body.
n. (rē′jĕkt)
1. One that has been rejected: a reject from the varsity team; a tire that is a reject.
2. Slang A foolish or socially inept person.

[Middle English rejecten, from Latin rēicere, rēiect- : re-, re- + iacere, to throw; see yē- in Indo-European roots.]

re·ject′er, re·jec′tor n.
re·jec′tion (-jĕk′shən) adj.
re·jec′tive adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.rejected - rebuffed (by a lover) without warning; "jilted at the altar"
unloved - not loved
References in classic literature ?
It would seem that having rejected the belief of the ancients in man's subjection to the Deity and in a predetermined aim toward which nations are led, modern history should study not the manifestations of power but the causes that produce it.
At Lacedaemon the choregus himself played on the flute; and it was so common at Athens that almost every freeman understood it, as is evident from the tablet which Thrasippus dedicated when he was choregus; but afterwards they rejected it as dangerous; having become better judges of what tended to promote virtue and what did not.
But after spending two months alone in the country, he was convinced that this was not one of those passions of which he had had experience in his early youth; that this feeling gave him not an instant's rest; that he could not live without deciding the question, would she or would she not be his wife, and that his despair had arisen only from his own imaginings, that he had no sort of proof that he would be rejected.
Why, it may be asked, have all the most eminent living naturalists and geologists rejected this view of the mutability of species?
And lastly, that the novelty, though it be not rejected, yet be held for a suspect; and, as the Scripture saith, that we make a stand upon the ancient way, and then look about us, and discover what is the straight and right way, and so to walk in it.
They might even entertain a preference to some other person, at the very moment they were assenting to the one proposed, because there might be no positive ground of opposition to him; and they could not be sure, if they withheld their assent, that the subsequent nomination would fall upon their own favorite, or upon any other person in their estimation more meritorious than the one rejected.
Rejected from the higher class, they are also despised by the lower.
Don't remind me that I have just rejected the palace of crystal for the sole reason that one cannot put out one's tongue at it.
Accordingly Grandfather told the children a story, to which, for want of a better title, we shall give that of The Rejected Blessing.
On this point, the argument against introspection must be rejected.
On the other hand, I see that Amadis of Gaul, without losing his senses and without doing anything mad, acquired as a lover as much fame as the most famous; for, according to his history, on finding himself rejected by his lady Oriana, who had ordered him not to appear in her presence until it should be her pleasure, all he did was to retire to the Pena Pobre in company with a hermit, and there he took his fill of weeping until Heaven sent him relief in the midst of his great grief and need.
Accordingly, seeing that our senses sometimes deceive us, I was willing to suppose that there existed nothing really such as they presented to us; and because some men err in reasoning, and fall into paralogisms, even on the simplest matters of geometry, I, convinced that I was as open to error as any other, rejected as false all the reasonings I had hitherto taken for demonstrations; and finally, when I considered that the very same thoughts(presentations) which we experience when awake may also be experienced when we are asleep, while there is at that time not one of them true, I supposed that all the objects (presentations) that had ever entered into my mind when awake, had in them no more truth than the illusions of my dreams.