relationless

relationless

(rɪˈleɪʃənlɪs)
adj
1. having no family relations
2. lacking relation in general
References in periodicals archive ?
The relationless relation can be discovered in seemingly non-personal relations, that is, between the owner of the maquiladora company who is living in the U.
The question of the literary genre is not a formal one: it eovers the motif of the law in general, of degeneration in the natural and symbolic senses, of birth in the natural and symbolic senses, of the generation difference, sexual difference between the feminine and the masculine gertre/gender, of the hymen between the two, of a relationless relation between the two, of ah identity and difference between the feminine and the masculine.
Point of view not only becomes evident as an element of the theory of supermodern spaces--it is how people feel in them (or how the theorist imagines they feel) that makes them such--but is visibly at work also in that theory's very conception, as the authorial perspective that classifies certain spaces as relationless non-places encounters but overrides contrary third-person experiences of them as relation-creating habitats.
Exactly this structure of thought came to meet the Christian theology: the latter had to understand God not as relationless, and therefore as above-being and above-thinking (uber-seiend und uber-denkend) in itself, but as a thinking Trinitarian relation" (Beierwaltes 1980:61; see also Beierwaltes 1985:198-201).
In contrast, the individual essence of an eternal object is its unchanging relationless unity.
But the actual bearers of the future, of the post-literary age itself, like the early mammals that scuttled among the legs of the dinosaurs, are all those myriad, apparently relationless formulative endeavors that we group under the head of "literary studies.
Responding to such demands in an age of Empire requires both a willingness to engage in and interrogate our own relationless relations, and a readiness to question the authority and legitimacy of a global system that perpetuates hermeneutical complacency, produces facile hybrids, and celebrates difference only to better contain it.
In place of such a claim--one that highlights the possibility or impossibility of this legacy--Derrida offers a rhetoric of survival, where survival is structural and originary, and where it generates an account of relationless relation in lieu of a transmissible, identifiable, and appropriable inheritance.