relative pronoun


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relative pronoun

A relative pronoun is a type of pronoun used to connect a relative clause (also known as an adjective clause) to the main clause in a sentence. Relative clauses either help clarify who or what a sentence is talking about (known as the antecedent), or else give extra information about it.
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relative pronoun

n.
A pronoun that introduces a relative clause and has reference to an antecedent, as who in the child who is wearing a hat or that in the house that you live in.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.relative pronoun - a pronoun (as `that' or `which' or `who') that introduces a relative clause referring to some antecedent
pronoun - a function word that is used in place of a noun or noun phrase
Translations
pronombre relativo
vonatkozó névmás
tilvísunarfornafn
pronome relativorelativo
関係代名詞
pronomen relativum
betrekkelijk voornaamwoord
relativt pronomen
pronome relativo
oziralni zaimek
relativpronomen
ilgi adılı
References in periodicals archive ?
In Excerpt 1, with the shortened pause and lengthened "who," it generates a drive across the pause, suggesting that the verse line has not yet ended, that the phrase "On the faces of my live comrades" and the relative pronoun "who" are one perceptual unit (even though the relative pronoun is part of a new clause).
Nonetheless, it is important to realize that--for all the current uncertainty --there was near-unanimous consent, lasting almost six centuries, to the notion that the relative pronoun cui in this verse was an accusative and that it referred to the protagonist's guide, Virgil.
Think of Kurt Cobain defining a generation by using the indefinite relative pronoun "whatever" in Smells Like Teen Spirit.
In (1), the head noun and the relative pronoun are marked for the same case.
As the phonological reconstruction clearly indicated, they were interpreted as midd[partial derivative]- and translated 'from what', d[partial derivative]- here represents an independent relative pronoun which is the subject of the subsequent verb.
The relative pronoun "that" (a specific person or thing) is replaced by "which" (the more generic form used to ask identity or introduce the non-essential), a clear reference to the speaker.
order where the relative pronoun is not the subject of the verb beginning the clause;
These include using plural nouns and pronouns ("pluralizing"), repeating the noun, using an article instead of a pronoun, using the relative pronoun "who," using paired pronouns ("he or she"), and recasting the sentence to avoid the need for a pronoun.
The subject of "did not respond" is a relative pronoun which, being the subject, needs to be in the nominative case, "who"; "the officer said" is a parenthetical expression.
Which start, like this sentence, with a relative pronoun, making the entire sentence a subordinate clause.
The pronoun subset we considered for anaphora resolution is formed off {I, he, she, it, they}, and their objective, reflexive and possessive forms, as well as the relative pronoun who.
Much in the same way that a verb or relative pronoun (combined with a singular collective noun) can occasionally be plural (see [10a]-[10d]), it is marginally possible that the form of a possessive or personal pronoun is at variance with that which would be expected on the basis of conceptual individuation:

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