relent


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re·lent

 (rĭ-lĕnt′)
intr.v. re·lent·ed, re·lent·ing, re·lents
1. To become more lenient, compassionate, or forgiving. See Synonyms at yield.
2. To become less severe or intense; slacken: The storm finally relented.

[Middle English relenten, to melt, from Anglo-Norman relenter, from relent, damp : Latin re-, re- + Latin lentus, sticky, slow.]

relent

(rɪˈlɛnt)
vb (intr)
1. to change one's mind about some decided course, esp a harsh one; become more mild or amenable
2. (of the pace or intensity of something) to slacken
3. (of the weather) to become more mild
[C14: from re- + Latin lentāre to bend, from lentus flexible, tenacious]

re•lent

(rɪˈlɛnt)

v.i.
1. to soften in feeling, temper, or determination; become more mild, compassionate, or forgiving.
2. to become less severe; slacken.
v.t.
3. Obs. to cause to soften or slacken.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Anglo-French relenter= Latin re- re- + lentāre to bend, derivative of lentus flexible, viscous, slow]
re•lent′ing•ly, adv.

relent

, resolve - Relent and resolve originally meant "melt, dissolve" in literal (under the influence of heat) and figurative senses.
See also related terms for melting.

relent


Past participle: relented
Gerund: relenting

Imperative
relent
relent
Present
I relent
you relent
he/she/it relents
we relent
you relent
they relent
Preterite
I relented
you relented
he/she/it relented
we relented
you relented
they relented
Present Continuous
I am relenting
you are relenting
he/she/it is relenting
we are relenting
you are relenting
they are relenting
Present Perfect
I have relented
you have relented
he/she/it has relented
we have relented
you have relented
they have relented
Past Continuous
I was relenting
you were relenting
he/she/it was relenting
we were relenting
you were relenting
they were relenting
Past Perfect
I had relented
you had relented
he/she/it had relented
we had relented
you had relented
they had relented
Future
I will relent
you will relent
he/she/it will relent
we will relent
you will relent
they will relent
Future Perfect
I will have relented
you will have relented
he/she/it will have relented
we will have relented
you will have relented
they will have relented
Future Continuous
I will be relenting
you will be relenting
he/she/it will be relenting
we will be relenting
you will be relenting
they will be relenting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been relenting
you have been relenting
he/she/it has been relenting
we have been relenting
you have been relenting
they have been relenting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been relenting
you will have been relenting
he/she/it will have been relenting
we will have been relenting
you will have been relenting
they will have been relenting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been relenting
you had been relenting
he/she/it had been relenting
we had been relenting
you had been relenting
they had been relenting
Conditional
I would relent
you would relent
he/she/it would relent
we would relent
you would relent
they would relent
Past Conditional
I would have relented
you would have relented
he/she/it would have relented
we would have relented
you would have relented
they would have relented
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.relent - give in, as to influence or pressure
truckle - yield to out of weakness

relent

verb
2. ease, die down, let up, fall, drop, slow, relax, weaken, slacken If the bad weather relents the game will be finished today.
ease increase, strengthen, intensify

relent

verb
To moderate or change a position or course of action as a result of pressure:
Idiom: give way.
Translations
يَلين
povolitslitovat sesmilovat sezměknoutobměkčit
give efter
mildast
atmaigt, kļūt pieļāvīgākam
dať sa obmäkčiť
insafa gelmekyumuşamak

relent

[rɪˈlent] VI
1. (= show compassion) → ablandarse, aplacarse
2. (= let up) [person] → descansar (fig) [weather] → mejorar

relent

[rɪˈlɛnt] vi
(= reverse a decision) → plier
(= soften one's attitude) → fléchir

relent

vi (person)nachgeben; (pace, pain)nachlassen; (weather)sich bessern

relent

[rɪˈlɛnt] vi (frm) → cedere

relent

(rəˈlent) verb
to become less severe or unkind; to agree after refusing at first. At first she wouldn't let them go to the cinema, but in the end she relented.
reˈlentless adjective
without pity; not allowing anything to keep one from what one is doing or trying to do. The police fight a relentless battle against crime.
reˈlentlessly adverb
reˈlentlessness noun
References in classic literature ?
Davis, feeling that any man possessing a human heart would relent when that delicious perfume met his nose.
When the whole earth is vibrant with life, does it not seem to you, Octavie, that heaven might for once relent and give us back our dead?
No; but she might suppose that something would occur in your favour; that your own family might in time relent.
Hannah had been cold and stiff, indeed, at the first: latterly she had begun to relent a little; and when she saw me come in tidy and well-dressed, she even smiled.
Oh, you see, Nelly, he would not relent a moment to keep me out of the grave.
In my honeymoon, too, when my most inveterate enemy might relent, one would think, and not envy me a little peace of mind and happiness.
Suppose he should relent And publish Grace to all, on promise made Of new Subjection; with what eyes could we Stand in his presence humble, and receive Strict Laws impos'd, to celebrate his Throne With warbl'd Hymns, and to his Godhead sing Forc't Halleluiah's; while he Lordly sits Our envied Sovran, and his Altar breathes Ambrosial Odours and Ambrosial Flowers, Our servile offerings.
And if thou wilt not relent or come to reason for me, do so for the sake of that poor knight thou hast beside thee; thy master I mean, whose soul I can this moment see, how he has it stuck in his throat not ten fingers from his lips, and only waiting for thy inflexible or yielding reply to make its escape by his mouth or go back again into his stomach.
Ah, monsieur," said D'Artagnan, as if to sum up in a word all that conversation, "if only his eminence would relent and grant to Monsieur de la Fere our liberty.
Still, let bygones be bygones: no man may keep his anger for ever; I said I would not relent till battle and the cry of war had reached my own ships; nevertheless, now gird my armour about your shoulders, and lead the Myrmidons to battle, for the dark cloud of Trojans has burst furiously over our fleet; the Argives are driven back on to the beach, cooped within a narrow space, and the whole people of Troy has taken heart to sally out against them, because they see not the visor of my helmet gleaming near them.
Even Yusef came and asked me on his knees to relent, and last of
And you shall marry an officer in the Guards, with a beautiful moustache: the son of a marquis, who will disinherit him for marrying you, but will relent when he sees your beauty and goodness--