relic


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

rel·ic

 (rĕl′ĭk)
n.
1. Something that has survived the passage of time, especially an object or custom whose original culture has disappeared: "Corporal punishment was a relic of barbarism" (Cyril Connolly).
2. Something cherished for its age or historic interest.
3. An object kept for its association with the past; a memento.
4. An object of religious veneration, especially a piece of the body or a personal item of a saint.
5. or relics A corpse; remains.

[Middle English relik, object of religious veneration, from Old French relique, from Late Latin reliquiae, sacred relics, from Latin, remains, from reliquus, remaining, from relinquere, relīqu-, to leave behind; see relinquish.]

relic

(ˈrɛlɪk)
n
1. something that has survived from the past, such as an object or custom
2. something kept as a remembrance or treasured for its past associations; keepsake
3. (usually plural) a remaining part or fragment
4. (Eastern Church (Greek & Russian Orthodox)) RC Church Eastern Churches part of the body of a saint or something supposedly used by or associated with a saint, venerated as holy
5. (Roman Catholic Church) RC Church Eastern Churches part of the body of a saint or something supposedly used by or associated with a saint, venerated as holy
6. informal an old or old-fashioned person or thing
7. (plural) archaic the remains of a dead person; corpse
8. (Biology) ecology a less common term for relict1
[C13: from Old French relique, from Latin reliquiae remains, from relinquere to leave behind, relinquish]

rel•ic

(ˈrɛl ɪk)

n.
1. a surviving memorial of something past.
2. an object having interest by reason of its age or its association with the past.
3. a surviving trace of something: a custom that is a relic of paganism.
4. relics,
a. remaining parts or fragments.
b. the remains of a deceased person.
5. something kept in remembrance; souvenir; memento.
6. a body, body part, or personal object associated with a saint or martyr and preserved as worthy of veneration.
7. a once widespread linguistic form that survives in a limited area but is otherwise obsolete.
[1175–1225; Middle English < Old French relique < Latin reliquiae (pl.) remains (> Old English reliquias) =reliqu(us) remaining + -iae pl. n. suffix]
leftover, relic, relief - Before leftovers were called leftovers, they were called relics, and, before that, relief.
See also related terms for leftovers.

relic

A part of the body or something used or associated with a saint or other very important religious figure such as the Buddha.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.relic - an antiquity that has survived from the distant pastrelic - an antiquity that has survived from the distant past
antiquity - an artifact surviving from the past
archeological remains - a relic that has been excavated from the soil
2.relic - something of sentimental valuerelic - something of sentimental value  
object, physical object - a tangible and visible entity; an entity that can cast a shadow; "it was full of rackets, balls and other objects"
love-token - keepsake given as a token of love
party favor, party favour, favour, favor - souvenir consisting of a small gift given to a guest at a party

relic

plural noun
1. remains, bones, sacred objects, holy objects ancient Egyptian relics

relic

noun
A mark or remnant that indicates the former presence of something:
Translations
بَقِيَّه، أثَررُفات
relikviepamátka
levnrelikvie
pyhäinjäännösreliikki
ereklyerelikviaemlék
reliktas
paliekas
pamiatkarelikvia
relikvija
kutsal emanet/kalıntıtarihi kalıntıyadigâr

relic

[ˈrelɪk] N (Rel) → reliquia f (fig) → vestigio m

relic

[ˈrɛlɪk] n
(= sacred object) → relique f
[the past] → vestige m, relique f

relic

nÜberbleibsel nt, → Relikt nt; (Rel) → Reliquie f; a relic of or from the pastein Überbleibsel ntaus vergangener Zeit; an old relic (pej inf, = person) → ein alter Knochen (inf); (= car/wardrobe etc)ein vorsintflutlicher Karren/Schrank etc (pej inf)

relic

[ˈrɛlɪk] n (Rel) → reliquia (fig) (of the past) → retaggio

relic

(ˈrelik) noun
1. something left from a past time. relics of an ancient civilization.
2. something connected with, especially the bones of, a dead person (especially a saint).
References in classic literature ?
The ingenuous Alice gazed at his free air and proud carriage, as she would have looked upon some precious relic of the Grecian chisel, to which life had been imparted by the intervention of a miracle; while Heyward, though accustomed to see the perfection of form which abounds among the uncorrupted natives, openly expressed his admiration at such an unblemished specimen of the noblest proportions of man.
The original papers, together with the scarlet letter itself -- a most curious relic -- are still in my possession, and shall be freely exhibited to whomsoever, induced by the great interest of the narrative, may desire a sight of them I must not be understood affirming that, in the dressing up of the tale, and imagining the motives and modes of passion that influenced the characters who figure in it, I have invariably confined myself within the limits of the old Surveyor's half-a-dozen sheets of foolscap.
As he talked along, softly, pleasantly, flowingly, he seemed to drift away imperceptibly out of this world and time, and into some remote era and old forgotten country; and so he gradually wove such a spell about me that I seemed to move among the specters and shadows and dust and mold of a gray antiquity, holding speech with a relic of it
Four or five years ago, some workmen who were digging foundations for a house came upon this interesting relic of a long-departed age.
She said it was the last relic she should ever have of her child; and that no other memorial of her could ever be so precious, because this one parted latest from the living body before the awful death came.
The streets were filled with people wearing their best clothes, and the fashions included not only "the latest thing," but the well preserved relic of a bygone day.
Any relic of the dead is precious, if they were valued living.
THE old Archiepiscopal Palace of Lambeth, on the southern bank of the Thames -with its Bishop's Walk and Garden, and its terrace fronting the river -- is an architectural relic of the London of former times, precious to all lovers of the picturesque, in the utilitarian London of the present day.
It is nothing smaller than the Crocodile Book, which is in rather a dilapidated condition by this time, with divers of the leaves torn and stitched across, but which Peggotty exhibits to the children as a precious relic.
Leaving that melancholy relic of carnivorous appetite, it turned its bold gold gaze on Nicolete.
The Prior of Jorvaulx crossed himself and repeated a pater noster, in which all devoutly joined, excepting the Jew, the Mahomedans, and the Templar; the latter of whom, without vailing his bonnet, or testifying any reverence for the alleged sanctity of the relic, took from his neck a gold chain, which he flung on the board, saying ``Let Prior Aymer hold my pledge and that of this nameless vagrant, in token that when the Knight of Ivanhoe comes within the four seas of Britain, he underlies the challenge of Brian de Bois-Guilbert, which, if he answer not, I will proclaim him as a coward on the walls of every Temple Court in Europe.
In Germany the petty-bourgeois class, a relic of the sixteenth century, and since then constantly cropping up again under various forms, is the real social basis of the existing state of things.