relieved


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re·lieve

 (rĭ-lēv′)
tr.v. re·lieved, re·liev·ing, re·lieves
1.
a. To cause a lessening or alleviation of: relieved all his symptoms; relieved the tension.
b. To make less tedious, monotonous, or unpleasant: Only one small candle relieved the gloom.
2. To free from pain, anxiety, or distress: I was relieved by the news that they had arrived home safely.
3.
a. To furnish assistance or aid to: relieve the flooded region.
b. To rescue from siege.
4.
a. To release (a person) from an obligation, restriction, or burden.
b. To free from a specified duty by providing or acting as a substitute.
c. Baseball To enter the game as a relief pitcher after (another pitcher).
5. Informal To rob or deprive: Pickpockets relieved him of his money.
6. Archaic To make prominent or effective by contrast; set off.
Idiom:
relieve (oneself)
To urinate or defecate.

[Middle English releven, from Old French relever, from Latin relevāre : re-, re- + levāre, to raise; see legwh- in Indo-European roots.]

re·liev′a·ble adj.
Synonyms: relieve, allay, alleviate, assuage, lighten2, mitigate, palliate
These verbs mean to make something less severe or more bearable. To relieve is to make more endurable something causing discomfort or distress: "that misery which he strives in vain to relieve" (Henry David Thoreau).
Allay suggests at least temporary relief from what is burdensome or painful: "This music crept by me upon the waters, / Allaying both their fury and my passion / With its sweet air" (Shakespeare).
Alleviate connotes temporary lessening of distress without removal of its cause: "No arguments shall be wanting on my part that can alleviate so severe a misfortune" (Jane Austen).
To assuage is to soothe or make milder: assuaged his guilt by confessing to the crime. Lighten signifies to make less heavy or oppressive: legislation that would lighten the taxpayer's burden. Mitigate and palliate connote moderating the force or intensity of something that causes suffering: "I ... prayed to the Lord to mitigate a calamity" (John Galt)."Organizations for writers palliate the writer's loneliness but I doubt if they improve his writing" (Ernest Hemingway).

relieved

(rɪˈliːvd)
adj
1. (postpositive; often foll by at, about, etc) experiencing relief, esp from worry or anxiety
2. (Mechanical Engineering) mechanical engineering having part of the surface cut away to avoid friction or wear
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.relieved - (of pain or sorrow) made easier to bearrelieved - (of pain or sorrow) made easier to bear
mitigated - made less severe or intense; "he gladly accepted the mitigated penalty"
2.relieved - extending out above or beyond a surface or boundary; "the jutting limb of a tree"; "massive projected buttresses"; "his protruding ribs"; "a pile of boards sticking over the end of his truck"
protrusive - thrusting outward

relieved

adjective glad, happy, pleased, comforted, cheered, reassured, grateful, thankful We are all relieved to be back home.
Translations
مُرْتاحمُسْتَريح، مُرْتاح
klidnýuklidněný
lettelettet
helpottunut
koji osjeća olakšanje
megkönnyebbült
feginn
安心した
마음이 놓이는
upokojený
lättad
ที่ผ่อนคลาย
rahatlamışferahlamış
bớt căng thẳng

relieved

[rɪˈliːvd] adjsoulagé(e)
to be relieved (that) ... → être soulagé que ...
to be relieved to hear it
I'm relieved to hear it → Je suis soulagé de l'entendre.

relieved

[rɪˈliːvd] adjsollevato/a
to be relieved that ... → essere sollevato/a (dal fatto) che...
I'm relieved to hear it → mi hai tolto un peso con questa notizia

relief

(rəˈliːf) noun
1. a lessening or stopping of pain, worry, boredom etc. When one has a headache, an aspirin brings relief; He gave a sigh of relief; It was a great relief to find nothing had been stolen.
2. help (eg food) given to people in need of it. famine relief; (also adjective) A relief fund has been set up to send supplies to the refugees.
3. a person who takes over some job or task from another person, usually after a given period of time. The bus-driver was waiting for his relief; (also adjective) a relief driver.
4. the act of freeing a town etc from siege. the relief of Mafeking.
5. a way of carving etc in which the design is raised above the level of its background. a carving in relief.
reˈlieve (-v) verb
1. to lessen or stop (pain, worry etc). The doctor gave him some drugs to relieve the pain; to relieve the hardship of the refugees.
2. to take over a job or task from. You guard the door first, and I'll relieve you in two hours.
3. to dismiss (a person) from his job or position. He was relieved of his post/duties.
4. to take (something heavy, difficult etc) from someone. May I relieve you of that heavy case?; The new gardener relieved the old man of the burden of cutting the grass.
5. to come to the help of (a town etc which is under siege or attack).
reˈlieved adjective
no longer anxious or worried. I was relieved to hear you had arrived safely.

relieved

مُرْتاح klidný lettet erleichtert ανακουφισμένος aliviado helpottunut soulagé koji osjeća olakšanje alleviato 安心した 마음이 놓이는 opgelucht lettet z ulgą aliviado облегченный lättad ที่ผ่อนคลาย rahatlamış bớt căng thẳng 放心的
References in classic literature ?
Arriving at Newgate, where some of the ruined cells had been hastily fitted up for the safe keeping of rioters, he was warmly received by the turnkeys, as an unusual and interesting case, which agreeably relieved their monotonous duties.
After looking at him in silence for some moments, Dennis, who was greatly relieved to find him in this mood, drew the chair towards his rough couch and sat down near him--taking the precaution, however, to keep out of the range of his brawny arm.
An excellent man, who only wanted somebody to manage him; and, between ourselves, he found somebody to do it; and what is more, he throve on it and grew fat on it, and lived happy and died easy on it, dating from the day when my lady took him to church to be married, to the day when she relieved him of his last breath, and closed his eyes for ever.
My mind being relieved in this manner, I went to sleep that night in the character of Lady Verinder's farm bailiff, and I woke up the next morning in the character of Lady Verinder's house-steward.
Relieved of their first anxiety about their father, girls insensibly relaxed their praiseworthy efforts a little, and began to fall back into old ways.
The carpet - of Saxony material - is quite half an inch thick, and is of the same crimson ground, relieved simply by the appearance of a gold cord (like that festooning the curtains) slightly relieved above the surface of the ground, and thrown upon it in such a manner as to form a succession of short irregular curves - one occasionally overlaying the other.
No,' said he; 'you have already done much towards it; you have done more for me than the most skilful physician could do: for you have relieved my mind of two great burdens - anxiety on my sister's account, and deep regret upon your own: for I do believe these two sources of torment have had more effect in working me up into a fever than anything else; and I am persuaded I shall soon recover now.
Stroeve went twice a day to the hospital to enquire after his wife, who still declined to see him; and came away at first relieved and hopeful because he was told that she seemed to be growing better, and then in despair because, the complication which the doctor had feared having ensued, recovery was impossible.
He was too happy, however, to need much attention; and luckily for the others, the business of love-making relieved them from a great deal of his company.
Her face relieved him of his misgivings, before she could speak.
I was confined to some which constantly tormented me; and the more, as I saw no prospect of being relieved from them.