relinquish

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re·lin·quish

 (rĭ-lĭng′kwĭsh)
tr.v. re·lin·quished, re·lin·quish·ing, re·lin·quish·es
1. To give up or abandon (control of something or a claim, for example).
2. To put aside or desist from (something practiced, professed, or intended); stop doing or adhering to.
3. To let go; surrender: relinquished the lands by treaty.
4. To cease holding physically; release: relinquish a grip.

[Middle English relinquisshen, from Old French relinquir, relinquiss-, from Latin relinquere : re-, re- + linquere, to leave; see leikw- in Indo-European roots.]

re·lin′quish·er n.
re·lin′quish·ment n.
Synonyms: relinquish, yield, resign, abandon, surrender, cede, waive, renounce
These verbs mean letting something go or giving something up. Relinquish, the least specific, may connote regret: can't relinquish his dream of emigrating. Yield implies giving way, as to pressure, often in the hope that such action will be temporary: had to yield ground. Resign suggests formal relinquishing (resigned their claim to my land) or acquiescence arising from hopelessness (resigned himself to forgoing his vacation). Abandon and surrender both imply no expectation of recovering what is given up; surrender also implies the operation of compulsion or force: abandoned all hope for a resolution; surrendered control of the company. Cede connotes formal transfer, as of territory: ceded the province to the victor. Waive implies a voluntary decision to dispense with something, such as a right: waived all privileges. To renounce is to relinquish formally and usually as a matter of principle: renounced worldly goods.

relinquish

(rɪˈlɪŋkwɪʃ)
vb (tr)
1. to give up (a task, struggle, etc); abandon
2. to surrender or renounce (a claim, right, etc)
3. to release; let go
[C15: from French relinquir, from Latin relinquere to leave behind, from re- + linquere to leave]
reˈlinquisher n
reˈlinquishment n

re•lin•quish

(rɪˈlɪŋ kwɪʃ)

v.t.
1. to renounce or surrender (a possession, right, claim, etc.).
2. to give up; put aside or desist from: to relinquish a plan.
3. to let go; release: to relinquish one's hold.
[1425–75; late Middle English relinquissen, relinquisshen < Middle French relinquiss-, long s. of relinquir « Latin relinquere to leave behind =re- re- + linquere to leave]
re•lin′quish•er, n.
re•lin′quish•ment, n.

relinquish


Past participle: relinquished
Gerund: relinquishing

Imperative
relinquish
relinquish
Present
I relinquish
you relinquish
he/she/it relinquishes
we relinquish
you relinquish
they relinquish
Preterite
I relinquished
you relinquished
he/she/it relinquished
we relinquished
you relinquished
they relinquished
Present Continuous
I am relinquishing
you are relinquishing
he/she/it is relinquishing
we are relinquishing
you are relinquishing
they are relinquishing
Present Perfect
I have relinquished
you have relinquished
he/she/it has relinquished
we have relinquished
you have relinquished
they have relinquished
Past Continuous
I was relinquishing
you were relinquishing
he/she/it was relinquishing
we were relinquishing
you were relinquishing
they were relinquishing
Past Perfect
I had relinquished
you had relinquished
he/she/it had relinquished
we had relinquished
you had relinquished
they had relinquished
Future
I will relinquish
you will relinquish
he/she/it will relinquish
we will relinquish
you will relinquish
they will relinquish
Future Perfect
I will have relinquished
you will have relinquished
he/she/it will have relinquished
we will have relinquished
you will have relinquished
they will have relinquished
Future Continuous
I will be relinquishing
you will be relinquishing
he/she/it will be relinquishing
we will be relinquishing
you will be relinquishing
they will be relinquishing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been relinquishing
you have been relinquishing
he/she/it has been relinquishing
we have been relinquishing
you have been relinquishing
they have been relinquishing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been relinquishing
you will have been relinquishing
he/she/it will have been relinquishing
we will have been relinquishing
you will have been relinquishing
they will have been relinquishing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been relinquishing
you had been relinquishing
he/she/it had been relinquishing
we had been relinquishing
you had been relinquishing
they had been relinquishing
Conditional
I would relinquish
you would relinquish
he/she/it would relinquish
we would relinquish
you would relinquish
they would relinquish
Past Conditional
I would have relinquished
you would have relinquished
he/she/it would have relinquished
we would have relinquished
you would have relinquished
they would have relinquished
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.relinquish - part with a possession or right; "I am relinquishing my bedroom to the long-term house guest"; "resign a claim to the throne"
hand, pass on, turn over, pass, reach, give - place into the hands or custody of; "hand me the spoon, please"; "Turn the files over to me, please"; "He turned over the prisoner to his lawyers"
derequisition - release from government control
sacrifice, give - endure the loss of; "He gave his life for his children"; "I gave two sons to the war"
2.relinquish - do without or cease to hold or adhere to; "We are dispensing with formalities"; "relinquish the old ideas"
kick, give up - stop consuming; "kick a habit"; "give up alcohol"
3.relinquish - turn away from; give up; "I am foreswearing women forever"
disclaim - renounce a legal claim or title to
abandon, give up - give up with the intent of never claiming again; "Abandon your life to God"; "She gave up her children to her ex-husband when she moved to Tahiti"; "We gave the drowning victim up for dead"
4.relinquish - release, as from one's griprelinquish - release, as from one's grip; "Let go of the door handle, please!"; "relinquish your grip on the rope--you won't fall"
muster out, discharge - release from military service
unclasp - release from a clasp; "She clasped and unclasped her hands"
pop - release suddenly; "pop the clutch"
toggle - release by a toggle switch; "toggle a bomb from an airplane"
unhand - remove the hand from
bring out, let out - bring out of a specific state
unleash - release or vent; "unleash one's anger"
let loose, loose, unleash - turn loose or free from restraint; "let loose mines"; "Loose terrible plagues upon humanity"
unleash - release from a leash; "unleash the dogs in the park"
disengage, withdraw - release from something that holds fast, connects, or entangles; "I want to disengage myself from his influence"; "disengage the gears"

relinquish

verb (Formal) give up, leave, release, drop, abandon, resign, desert, quit, yield, hand over, surrender, withdraw from, let go, retire from, renounce, waive, vacate, say goodbye to, forsake, cede, repudiate, cast off, forgo, abdicate, kiss (something) goodbye, lay aside He does not intend to relinquish power.

relinquish

verb
1. To give up a possession, claim, or right:
2. To cease trying to accomplish or continue:
Informal: swear off.
Slang: lay off.
3. To let (something) go:
Translations
يَتَخَلّى عن
vzdát se
give afkald på
luopualuovuttaa
gefa eftir; láta af hendi
포기하다
atmestatteikties

relinquish

[rɪˈlɪŋkwɪʃ] VT [+ claim, right] → renunciar a; [+ control] → ceder; [+ post] → renunciar a, dimitir de
to relinquish one's grip on sth (lit) → soltar algo

relinquish

[rɪˈlɪŋkwɪʃ] vt [+ power, claim] → renoncer à; [+ plan, habit] → renoncer à

relinquish

vt
(= give up) hope, habit, planaufgeben; right, possessions, power, postaufgeben, verzichten auf (+acc); titleablegen; to relinquish something to somebodyjdm etw abtreten or überlassen
(= let go) to relinquish one’s hold on somebody/something (lit, fig)jdn/etw loslassen; he relinquished his hold on lifesein Lebenswille erstarb

relinquish

[rɪˈlɪŋkwɪʃ] vt (frm) (right, control, responsibility) → rinunciare a; (post) → lasciare, abbandonare
to relinquish one's hold on sth → lasciare andare qc

relinquish

(rəˈliŋkwiʃ) verb
to give up. The dictator was forced to relinquish control of the country.
References in classic literature ?
to execute a relinquishment of his share in the partnership, and even a bill of sale on the very furniture of his house, in consideration of a certain annuity, to be well and truly paid by - HEEP - on the four common quarter-days in each and every year.
This has been represented as a tacit relinquishment of those debts, and as a wicked contrivance to screen public defaulters.
The parley continued; the Arickaras released one horse and then another, in earnest of their proposition; finding, however, that nothing short of the relinquishment of all their spoils would purchase the lives of the captives, they abandoned them to their fate, moving off with many parting words and lamentable howlings.
The belief of being prudent, and self-denying, principally for his advantage, was her chief consolation, under the misery of a parting, a final parting; and every consolation was required, for she had to encounter all the additional pain of opinions, on his side, totally unconvinced and unbending, and of his feeling himself ill used by so forced a relinquishment.
With the quiet relinquishment of this long-cherished dream, eagerness for the realization of an even more precious one took possession of her.
But against his taking this step, which he still felt to be a contemptible relinquishment of present work, a guilty turning aside from what was a real and might be a widening channel for worthy activity, to start again without any justified destination, there was this obstacle, that the purchaser, if procurable at all, might not be quickly forthcoming.
With the latter in his possession, the ransom which might be obtained for the captive would form no great inducement to her relinquishment in the face of the pleasures of sole ownership of her.
Mr Squeers's first tokens of consternation, and his flat relinquishment of the task, would have staggered most men, if they had not immediately occasioned an utter abandonment of the proposition.
Again, he remembered that Mr Allworthy had insisted on an entire relinquishment of all violent means; and, indeed, as he made no doubt but that Jones would be hanged, he did not in the least question succeeding with his daughter by fair means; he now, therefore, once more gave a loose to his natural fondness for her, which had such an effect on the dutiful, grateful, tender, and affectionate heart of Sophia, that had her honour, given to Jones, and something else, perhaps, in which he was concerned, been removed, I much doubt whether she would not have sacrificed herself to a man she did not like, to have obliged her father.