remoralization

remoralization

(riːˌmɒrəlaɪˈzeɪʃən) or

remoralisation

n
the act of instilling with morals again; the act of making moral again
References in periodicals archive ?
Between the ride and the story: Illness and remoralization.
The narratives and ideals that accompany this remoralization offer weight to the citizen food consumer as a legitimate subject for popular and political concern.
Just as other considerations of cultural background should be respectfully considered, so should the clients' R/S commitments (Griffith & Griggs, 2001) as these interactions can provide hope, remoralization, and a shared formation and language of their lived experiences (Rosenfeld, 2010).
In summary, we do not see here any commitment to systematic redistribution but a plan for the remoralization of the economy at the individual level.
Kennedy, The Jena Six, Mass Incarceration, and the Remoralization of Civil Rights, 44 HARV.
She concludes by emphasizing reforms in terms of reculturation, restructuring, and remoralization.
Murray does a masterly job contrasting the remoralization of Belmont with the demoralization of Fishtown.
Obama echoes the call of some of our keenest social critics for a remoralization of politics and society.
Finally, we summarize the medicalization and remoralization that occurred as a response to the advent of HIV/AIDS.
New Labour's reclamation of "community" was evident in Blair's remoralization thesis that first surfaced in his speech following James Bulger's tragic death.
At one end is the concern with citizenship, empowerment, democratization and social justice, while at the other end social capital may be associated with strategies to strengthen traditional family and community structures and the remoralization of the social order.
Remoralization and provision of a rationale for change were important considering that the client entered counseling with a negative image about the counseling process (e.