remoralize

remoralize

(riːˈmɒrəˌlaɪz) or

remoralise

vb (tr)
to instil with morals again; make moral again
References in periodicals archive ?
Gorski, the "guest editors" of this issue of the Canadian Review of Sociology, wanted to reopen the old debate about axiological neutrality in sociology, not so much to politicize the discipline as to remoralize it.
He describes a number of contemporary examples that constitute "a discernible trend to remoralize the market through issues of ethical consumerism and globalization" (119).
That said, they are not seeking to dispense with economy, but to remoralize it and, perhaps, re-politicize it.
One cannot disagree with him abut the need to remoralize the study of markets.
I do think the rhetorical relay is an additional strategy to isolate sex harm, and to remoralize sex in a more gay-friendly nation and a more gay-friendly Court.
At the same time that neoliberals were attempting conceptually to remoralize the link between welfare and employment and to 'responsibilize' individuals for investing in their own education, neoliberal governments began to dismantle arrangements for state arbitration in the labor market, substituting individualized employment contracts, and exposing workers to the vagaries of the market--i.
This intense desire to remoralize the nation has produced a willingness to use state apparatuses to implement desired goals such as welfare and educational reforms (see Gerson, 1996).
However, we can queer that discourse, remoralize it, and call it out for what it is (and isn't), without predicting where this may take us.
Since The Origin of Species scientists and philosophers have debated whether evolution would remoralize natural law or drain the last drop of blood from its corpse.
The League aimed to remoralize the sphere of consumption, and that is what the leaders of the League meant when they claimed that it was nothing less than a new religion or way of life.
The enterprise culture appears then to remoralize the world of individual social action (Drakopolou-Dodd & Anderson, 2001).
In the article, Jeffrey Goldberg explored how 'A conservative-led Washington coalition tries to remoralize American foreign policy', citing activists who claim unprecedented persecution of Christians in the 20th century.