Renaissance


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Renaissance
top: Château de Chambord
Chambord, France
bottom: The Return of Judith
to Bethulia, c. 1469,
by Sandro Botticelli
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Renaissance

ren·ais·sance

 (rĕn′ĭ-säns′, -zäns′, rĭ-nā′səns)
n.
1. A rebirth or revival.
2. Renaissance
a. The humanistic revival of classical art, architecture, literature, and learning that originated in Italy in the 14th century and later spread throughout Europe.
b. The period of this revival, roughly the 14th through the 16th century, marking the transition from medieval to modern times.
3. often Renaissance
a. A revival of intellectual or artistic achievement and vigor: the Celtic Renaissance.
b. The period of such a revival.
adj. Renaissance
1. Of, relating to, or characteristic of the Renaissance or its artistic and intellectual works and styles.
2. Of or being the style of architecture and decoration, based on classical models, that originated in Italy in the 14th century and continued throughout Europe up to the end of the 16th century.

[French, from Old French, from renaistre, to be born again, from Vulgar Latin *renāscere, from Latin renāscī : re-, re- + nāscī, to be born; see genə- in Indo-European roots.]

Renaissance

(rəˈneɪsəns; US ˈrɛnəˌsɒns)
n
1. (Historical Terms) the Renaissance the period of European history marking the waning of the Middle Ages and the rise of the modern world: usually considered as beginning in Italy in the 14th century
2. (Historical Terms)
a. the spirit, culture, art, science, and thought of this period. Characteristics of the Renaissance are usually considered to include intensified classical scholarship, scientific and geographical discovery, a sense of individual human potentialities, and the assertion of the active and secular over the religious and contemplative life
b. (as modifier): Renaissance writers. See also Early Renaissance, High Renaissance
adj
(Historical Terms) of, characteristic of, or relating to the Renaissance, its culture, etc

renaissance

(rəˈneɪsəns; US ˈrɛnəˌsɒns) or

renascence

n
a revival or rebirth, esp of culture and learning
[C19: from French, from Latin re- + nascī to be born]

Ren•ais•sance

(ˌrɛn əˈsɑns, -ˈzɑns, -ˈsɑ̃s, ˈrɛn əˌsɑns, -ˌzɑns, -ˌsɑ̃s; esp. Brit. rɪˈneɪ səns)

n. Also, Renascence.
1. the activity, spirit, or time of the great revival of art, literature, and learning in Europe beginning in the 14th century and extending to the 17th century, marking the transition from the medieval to the modern world.
2. the forms and treatments in art used during this period.
3. (sometimes l.c.) any similar revival in the world of art and learning.
4. (l.c.) renewal; rebirth: a moral renaissance.
adj.
5. of, pertaining to, or suggestive of the European Renaissance: Renaissance attitudes.
6. of or pertaining to the style of architecture and decoration originating in Italy in the 15th century, characterized by the revival and adaptation of ancient Roman motifs and forms, including the classical orders, and by an emphasis on symmetry.
[1830–40; < French, Middle French: rebirth =renaiss- (s. of renaistre to be born again < Latin renāscī; re- re- + nāscī to be born) + -ance -ance]

Renaissance

(c. 1300–1545) Meaning “rebirth,” the term describes the revival of classical learning and art. Centered at first in Florence, it marked the end of the Middle Ages and was the outstanding creative period in western art. Architecture, painting, and sculpture, deriving from Greek and Roman models, developed with an unparalleled vigor and prominence, and the artist gained a role in society hitherto unknown, mainly due to the rival city states that employed them. Artistic innovation included perspective and painting with oil.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.renaissance - the period of European history at the close of the Middle Ages and the rise of the modern worldRenaissance - the period of European history at the close of the Middle Ages and the rise of the modern world; a cultural rebirth from the 14th through the middle of the 17th centuries
High Renaissance - the artistic style of early 16th century painting in Florence and Rome; characterized by technical mastery and heroic composition and humanistic content
history - the aggregate of past events; "a critical time in the school's history"
quattrocento - the 15th century in Italian art and literature
Italian Renaissance - the early period when Italy was the center of the Renaissance
2.Renaissance - the revival of learning and culture
resurgence, revitalisation, revitalization, revival, revivification - bringing again into activity and prominence; "the revival of trade"; "a revival of a neglected play by Moliere"; "the Gothic revival in architecture"

renaissance

renascence
noun rebirth, revival, restoration, renewal, awakening, resurrection, regeneration, resurgence, reappearance, new dawn, re-emergence, reawakening, new birth Popular art is experiencing a renaissance.

renaissance

noun
Translations
obrozenírenesancerenesanční
Renaissancerenaissancistisch
renessanssi
ルネサンスルネッサンス
renesansa

Renaissance

[rəˈnɛsɑːns] (Art, Hist)
A. N the Renaissanceel Renacimiento
the 12th century Renaissanceel renacimiento del siglo XII

renaissance

[rəˈnɛsɑːns] Nrenacimiento m
a spiritual renaissanceun renacimiento or despertar espiritual

Renaissance

[rəˈneɪsəns]
n
the Renaissance → la Renaissance
modif [period] → de la Renaissance; [painting, masterpiece] → de la Renaissance

renaissance

[rɪˈneɪsəns]
n (= revival) → renaissance f

renaissance

n (liter)Wiedergeburt f; (of nature)Wiedererwachen nt; the Renaissance (Hist) → die Renaissance; Renaissance mander Renaissancemensch; (fig)der Humanist; (= all-rounder)Allroundtalent nt

Renaissance

[rɪˈneɪsɑ̃ːns]
1. n the Renaissanceil Rinascimento
2. adj (style) → (del) Rinascimento; (palace, art) → rinascimentale, del Rinascimento
References in classic literature ?
The brass nail-heads are in the purest style of the early Renaissance.
She looked, indeed, like one of those wonderful boys of the Italian Renaissance, whom you may still see at the National Gallery, whose beauty is no denial, but rather the stamp of their slender, supple strength, young painters and sculptors who held the palette for Leonardo, or wielded the chisel for Michelangelo, and anon threw both aside to take up sword for Guelf or Ghibelline in the narrow streets of Florence.
He turned them out and, having thrown his hat and cape on the table, passed through the library towards the door of his bedroom, a large octagonal chamber on the ground floor that, in his new-born feeling for luxury, he had just had decorated for himself and hung with some curious Renaissance tapestries that had been discovered stored in a disused attic at Selby Royal.
One might point out how the Renaissance was great, because it sought to solve no social problem, and busied itself not about such things, but suffered the individual to develop freely, beautifully, and naturally, and so had great and individual artists, and great and individual men.
The Renaissance nobles of the Tudor time were like that.
She'd find a rum sort of thing in the garden," said Father Brown, "which would not please her Renaissance eye.
Remember," he was saying, "the facts about this church of Santa Croce; how it was built by faith in the full fervour of medievalism, before any taint of the Renaissance had appeared.
I did not know what in the mischief the Renaissance was, and so always I had to simply say,
Sometimes they lounged at the steps of a church, and sometimes dallied among cypresses against a cloudless sky; sometimes they made love by a Renaissance well-head, and sometimes they wandered through the Campagna by the side of an ox-waggon.
This chapel, quite new, having been built only six years, was entirely in that charming taste of delicate architecture, of marvellous sculpture, of fine and deep chasing, which marks with us the end of the Gothic era, and which is perpetuated to about the middle of the sixteenth century in the fairylike fancies of the Renaissance.
The Renaissance inherited the old foolish prejudice of Roman times, when, although the writers of plays were the intimate friends of emperors, the actors were thought infamous.
The Renaissance and the Elizabethan Period, about 1500 to 1603.