renewing


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re·new

 (rĭ-no͞o′, -nyo͞o′)
v. re·newed, re·new·ing, re·news
v.tr.
1. To make new or as if new again; restore: renewed the antique chair.
2. To take up again; resume: renew an old friendship; renewed the argument.
3. To repeat so as to reaffirm: renew a promise.
4. To regain or restore the physical or mental vigor of; revive: I renewed my spirits in the country air.
5.
a. To arrange for the extension of: renew a contract; renew a magazine subscription.
b. To arrange to extend the loan of: renewed the library books before they were overdue.
6. To replenish: renewed the water in the humidifier.
7. To bring into being again; reestablish.
v.intr.
1. To become new again.
2. To start over.

[Middle English renewen : re-, re- + newen, to renew (from new, new; see new).]

re·new′er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.renewing - tending to impart new life and vigor to; "the renewing warmth of the sunshine"
invigorating - imparting strength and vitality; "the invigorating mountain air"

renewing

adjective
References in classic literature ?
Montcalm followed him as far as the entrance of the marquee, renewing his invitations to the commandant of the fort to give him an immediate meeting in the open ground between the two armies.
His error lay in supposing that this age, more than any past or future one, is destined to see the tattered garments of Antiquity exchanged for a new suit, instead of gradually renewing themselves by patchwork; in applying his own little life-span as the measure of an interminable achievement; and, more than all, in fancying that it mattered anything to the great end in view whether he himself should contend for it or against it.
There was one thing that much aided me in renewing and re-creating the stalwart soldier of the Niagara frontier -- the man of true and simple energy.
Tell your aunt, little Emma, that she ought to set you a better example than to be renewing old grievances, and that if she were not wrong before, she is now.
Much as she had suffered from her first conversation with Lucy on the subject, she soon felt an earnest wish of renewing it; and this for more reasons than one.
Renewing then my courage, and gathering my feeble remains of strength, I pushed on.
The idea of being again surrounded by those honest faces, shining welcome on me; of renewing the peacefulness of the sweet Sunday morning, when the bells were ringing, the stones dropping in the water, and the shadowy ships breaking through the mist; of roaming up and down with little Em'ly, telling her my troubles, and finding charms against them in the shells and pebbles on the beach; made a calm in my heart.
Look downward on that Globe whose hither side With light from hence, though but reflected, shines; That place is Earth the seat of Man, that light His day, which else as th' other Hemisphere Night would invade, but there the neighbouring Moon (So call that opposite fair Starr) her aide Timely interposes, and her monthly round Still ending, still renewing, through mid Heav'n; With borrowd light her countenance triform Hence fills and empties to enlighten th' Earth, And in her pale dominion checks the night.
After this fourth encounter, there was a considerable pause; nor did it appear that any one was very desirous of renewing the contest The spectators murmured among themselves; for, among the challengers, Malvoisin and Front-de-B
Lastly, Philippe would perhaps not have taken his brother behind the scenes of the Opera if Raoul had not been the first to ask him, repeatedly renewing his request with a gentle obstinacy which the count remembered at a later date.
He of the green gaban would have offered resistance, but he found himself ill-matched as to arms, and did not think it prudent to come to blows with a madman, for such Don Quixote now showed himself to be in every respect; and the latter, renewing his commands to the keeper and repeating his threats, gave warning to the gentleman to spur his mare, Sancho his Dapple, and the carter his mules, all striving to get away from the cart as far as they could before the lions broke loose.
In countries where modern civilisation has become fully developed, a new class of petty bourgeois has been formed, fluctuating between proletariat and bourgeoisie and ever renewing itself as a supplementary part of bourgeois society.