renown


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re·nown

 (rĭ-noun′)
n.
1. The quality of being widely known or acclaimed; fame.
2. Obsolete Report; rumor.

[Middle English renoun, from Anglo-Norman, from renomer, to make famous : re-, repeatedly (from Latin; see re-) + nomer, to name (from Latin nōmināre, from nōmen, nōmin-, name; see nō̆-men- in Indo-European roots).]

renown

(rɪˈnaʊn)
n
widespread reputation, esp of a good kind; fame
[C14: from Anglo-Norman renoun, from Old French renom, from renomer to celebrate, from re- + nomer to name, from Latin nōmināre]

re•nown

(rɪˈnaʊn)

n.
1. widespread and high repute; fame.
2. Obs. report or rumor.
[1300–50; Middle English renoun < Anglo-French; Old French renom, derivative of renomer to make famous =re- re- + nomer < Latin nōmināre to name]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.renown - the state or quality of being widely honored and acclaimedrenown - the state or quality of being widely honored and acclaimed
honour, laurels, honor - the state of being honored

renown

noun fame, note, distinction, repute, mark, reputation, honour, glory, celebrity, acclaim, stardom, eminence, lustre, illustriousness She used to be a singer of some renown.

renown

noun
1. A position of exalted widely recognized importance:
2. Wide recognition for one's deeds:
Translations
شُهْرَه، صيت حَسَن
renomésláva
berømmelse
kuuluisuusmaine
frægî
pagarsėjęs
slava
faimărenume

renown

[rɪˈnaʊn] Nrenombre m, fama f

renown

[rɪˈnaʊn] nrenommée f

renown

nguter Ruf, Ansehen nt; of great renownvon hohem Ansehen, sehr berühmt; a wine of renownein renommierter Wein

renown

[rɪˈnaʊn] nrinomanza, fama

renown

(rəˈnaun) noun
fame.
reˈnowned adjective
famous. He is renowned for his paintings; a renowned actress.
References in classic literature ?
He was, in truth, a minstrel of the western continent--of a much later day, certainly, than those gifted bards, who formerly sang the profane renown of baron and prince, but after the spirit of his own age and country; and he was now prepared to exercise the cunning of his craft, in celebration of, or rather in thanksgiving for, the recent victory.
In proof of the authenticity of this legendary renown, Hepzibah could have exhibited the shell of a great egg, which an ostrich need hardly have been ashamed of.
The young divine, whose scholar-like renown still lived in Oxford, was considered by his more fervent admirers as little less than a heavenly ordained apostle, destined, should he live and labour for the ordinary term of life, to do as great deeds, for the now feeble New England Church, as the early Fathers had achieved for the infancy of the Christian faith.
There was a roomful of old books at Bly--last-century fiction, some of it, which, to the extent of a distinctly deprecated renown, but never to so much as that of a stray specimen, had reached the sequestered home and appealed to the unavowed curiosity of my youth.
The king thought I ought now to set forth in quest of adventures, so that I might gain renown and be the more worthy to meet Sir Sagramor when the several years should have rolled away.
He becomes famous in his own university, his renown spreads to other universities.
I burnt for the more active life of the world- -for the more exciting toils of a literary career--for the destiny of an artist, author, orator; anything rather than that of a priest: yes, the heart of a politician, of a soldier, of a votary of glory, a lover of renown, a luster after power, beat under my curate's surplice.
I took what Joe gave me, and found it to be the crumpled playbill of a small metropolitan theatre, announcing the first appearance, in that very week, of "the celebrated Provincial Amateur of Roscian renown, whose unique performance in the highest tragic walk of our National Bard has lately occasioned so great a sensation in local dramatic circles.
After these appear'd A crew who under Names of old Renown, OSIRIS, ISIS, ORUS and their Train With monstrous shapes and sorceries abus'd Fanatic EGYPT and her Priests, to seek Thir wandring Gods disguis'd in brutish forms Rather then human.
The name of Robin Hood, if duly conjured with, should raise a spirit as soon as that of Rob Roy; and the patriots of England deserve no less their renown in our modern circles, than the Bruces and Wallaces of Caledonia.
When I had for some time entertained their excellencies, to their infinite satisfaction and surprise, I desired they would do me the honour to present my most humble respects to the emperor their master, the renown of whose virtues had so justly filled the whole world with admiration, and whose royal person I resolved to attend, before I returned to my own country.
In short, his wits being quite gone, he hit upon the strangest notion that ever madman in this world hit upon, and that was that he fancied it was right and requisite, as well for the support of his own honour as for the service of his country, that he should make a knight-errant of himself, roaming the world over in full armour and on horseback in quest of adventures, and putting in practice himself all that he had read of as being the usual practices of knights-errant; righting every kind of wrong, and exposing himself to peril and danger from which, in the issue, he was to reap eternal renown and fame.