rent


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Related to rent: Rent a car

rent 1

 (rĕnt)
n.
1.
a. Payment, usually of an amount fixed by contract, made by a tenant at specified intervals in return for the right to occupy or use the property of another.
b. A similar payment made for the use of a facility, equipment, or service provided by another.
2. The return derived from cultivated or improved land after deduction of all production costs.
3. The difference between the price paid for use of a resource whose supply is inelastic and the minimum price at which that resource would still be provided. Also called economic rent.
v. rent·ed, rent·ing, rents
v.tr.
1. To obtain occupancy or use of (another's property) in return for regular payments.
2. To grant temporary occupancy or use of (one's own property or a service) in return for regular payments: rents out TV sets.
v.intr.
To be for rent: The cottage rents for $1,200 a month.
Idiom:
for rent
Available for use or service in return for payment.

[Middle English rente, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin *rendita, from feminine past participle of *rendere, to yield, return; see render.]

rent′a·bil′i·ty n.
rent′a·ble adj.

rent 2

 (rĕnt)
v.
A past tense and a past participle of rend.
n.
1. An opening made by rending; a rip.
2. A breach of relations between persons or groups; a rift.

rent

(rɛnt)
n
1. a payment made periodically by a tenant to a landlord or owner for the occupation or use of land, buildings, or by a user for the use of other property, such as a telephone
2. (Economics) economics
a. that portion of the national income accruing to owners of land and real property
b. the return derived from the cultivation of land in excess of production costs
3. for rent chiefly US and Canadian available for use and occupation subject to the payment of rent
vb
4. (tr) to grant (a person) the right to use one's property in return for periodic payments
5. (tr) to occupy or use (property) in return for periodic payments
6. (often foll by: at) to be let or rented (for a specified rental)
[C12: from Old French rente revenue, from Vulgar Latin rendere (unattested) to yield; see render]
ˌrentaˈbility n
ˈrentable adj

rent

(rɛnt)
n
1. a slit or opening made by tearing or rending; tear
2. a breach or division, as in relations
vb
the past tense and past participle of rend

rent1

(rɛnt)

n.
1. a payment made periodically by a tenant to a landlord in return for the use of land or property.
2. a payment made by a lessee to an owner in return for the use of machinery, equipment, etc.
3. the yield on a piece of land, as the profit on produce over the cost of production.
4. profit or return derived from any differential advantage in production.
v.t.
5. to grant the possession and use of (property, machinery, etc.) in return for payment of rent (often fol. by out).
6. to take and hold (property, machinery, etc.) in return for payment of rent to the landlord or owner.
v.i.
7. to be leased or let for rent.
8. to lease or let property.
9. to take possession of and use property by paying rent.
Idioms:
for rent, available to be rented: an apartment for rent.
[1125–75; rente < Old French < Vulgar Latin *rendita, feminine past participle of *rendere (see render1)]
rent`a•bil′i•ty, n.
rent′a•ble, adj.
rent′er, n.
syn: See hire.

rent2

(rɛnt)

n.
1. an opening made by rending or tearing; fissure.
2. a breach of relations; schism.
[1525–35; n. use of rent (obsolete or dial.) to tear, Middle English, appar. alter. of renden rend, based on the past participle]

rent3

(rɛnt)
v.
pt. and pp. of rend.

rent

  • rentier - A person who makes income from rent.
  • disposable income, discretionary income - Disposable income is money you have left after paying taxes; discretionary income is money left over after paying for rent, food, utilities, and life's other necessities.
  • farm - Comes from medieval Latin firma, "fixed annual payment or rent."
  • ablocate - To rent or rent out.

hire

rentlet
1. 'hire' and 'rent'

If you pay a sum of money in order to use something for a short period of time, you can say that you hire it or rent it. Hire is more common in British English and rent is more common in American English.

We hired a car from a local car agency and drove across the island.
He rented a car for the weekend.

If you make a series of payments in order to use something for a long period, you say that you rent it. You do not usually say that you 'hire' it.

A month's deposit may be required before you can rent the house.
2. 'hire out'

If you hire something from someone, you can say that they hire it out to you.

Companies hiring out boats do well in the summer months.
3. 'rent out'

If you rent something from someone, you can say that they rent it out to you.

They had to rent out the upstairs room.
4. 'let' and 'let out'

If you rent a building or piece of land from someone, you can say that they let it to you or let it out to you. The past tense and -ed participle of let is let.

The cottage was let to an actor from London.
I couldn't sell the house, so I let it out.

This usage is more common in British English than American English. The usual American terms are rent and rent out.

The house was rented to a farmer.
He repaired the boat and rented it out for $150.

rent


Past participle: rented
Gerund: renting

Imperative
rent
rent
Present
I rent
you rent
he/she/it rents
we rent
you rent
they rent
Preterite
I rented
you rented
he/she/it rented
we rented
you rented
they rented
Present Continuous
I am renting
you are renting
he/she/it is renting
we are renting
you are renting
they are renting
Present Perfect
I have rented
you have rented
he/she/it has rented
we have rented
you have rented
they have rented
Past Continuous
I was renting
you were renting
he/she/it was renting
we were renting
you were renting
they were renting
Past Perfect
I had rented
you had rented
he/she/it had rented
we had rented
you had rented
they had rented
Future
I will rent
you will rent
he/she/it will rent
we will rent
you will rent
they will rent
Future Perfect
I will have rented
you will have rented
he/she/it will have rented
we will have rented
you will have rented
they will have rented
Future Continuous
I will be renting
you will be renting
he/she/it will be renting
we will be renting
you will be renting
they will be renting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been renting
you have been renting
he/she/it has been renting
we have been renting
you have been renting
they have been renting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been renting
you will have been renting
he/she/it will have been renting
we will have been renting
you will have been renting
they will have been renting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been renting
you had been renting
he/she/it had been renting
we had been renting
you had been renting
they had been renting
Conditional
I would rent
you would rent
he/she/it would rent
we would rent
you would rent
they would rent
Past Conditional
I would have rented
you would have rented
he/she/it would have rented
we would have rented
you would have rented
they would have rented
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rent - a payment or series of payments made by the lessee to an owner for use of some property, facility, equipment, or servicerent - a payment or series of payments made by the lessee to an owner for use of some property, facility, equipment, or service
annuity in advance - an annuity paid in a series of more or less equal payments at the beginning of equally spaced periods; "rent payable in advance constitutes an annuity in advance for the landlord"
ground rent - payment for the right to occupy and improve a piece of land
peppercorn rent - very low or nominal rent
rack rent - an extortionate rent
2.rent - an opening made forcibly as by pulling apart; "there was a rip in his pants"; "she had snags in her stockings"
opening, gap - an open or empty space in or between things; "there was a small opening between the trees"; "the explosion made a gap in the wall"
3.rent - the return derived from cultivated land in excess of that derived from the poorest land cultivated under similar conditions
proceeds, take, takings, yield, payoff, issue, return - the income or profit arising from such transactions as the sale of land or other property; "the average return was about 5%"
4.rent - the act of rending or ripping or splitting something; "he gave the envelope a vigorous rip"
tear - the act of tearing; "he took the manuscript in both hands and gave it a mighty tear"
Verb1.rent - let for money; "We rented our apartment to friends while we were abroad"
contract, undertake - enter into a contractual arrangement
2.rent - grant use or occupation of under a term of contract; "I am leasing my country estate to some foreigners"
give - transfer possession of something concrete or abstract to somebody; "I gave her my money"; "can you give me lessons?"; "She gave the children lots of love and tender loving care"
sublease, sublet - lease or rent all or part of (a leased or rented property) to another person; "We sublet our apartment over the summer"
hire out, rent out, farm out - grant the services of or the temporary use of, for a fee; "We rent out our apartment to tourists every year"; "He hired himself out as a cook"
3.rent - engage for service under a term of contract; "We took an apartment on a quiet street"; "Let's rent a car"; "Shall we take a guide in Rome?"
acquire, get - come into the possession of something concrete or abstract; "She got a lot of paintings from her uncle"; "They acquired a new pet"; "Get your results the next day"; "Get permission to take a few days off from work"
4.rent - hold under a lease or rental agreement; of goods and services
contract, undertake - enter into a contractual arrangement

rent

1
verb
1. hire, lease He rented a car.
2. let, lease, sublet, sublease She rented rooms to university students.
noun
1. hire, rental, lease, tariff, fee, payment She worked to pay the rent.

rent

2
noun
1. tear, split, rip, slash, slit, gash, perforation, hole a small rent in the silk
2. opening, break, hole, crack, breach, flaw, chink welling up from a rent in the ground

rent 1

verb
1. To engage the temporary use of (something) for a fee:
2. To give temporary use of in return for payment:
hire (out), lease, let.

rent 2

noun
1. A hole made by tearing:
2. An interruption in friendly relations:
Translations
إيجارإيجار، اُجْرَة السَّكَنخَرْق في الثَّوْبيُؤَجِّرُيَسْتأجِر، يُؤَجِّر
nájemnépronajmouttrhlinanajímatnájem
lejeudlejeflænge
vuokravuokrata
najamninastanarinaunajmiti
kiven
leigaleigjarifa
家賃賃貸する賃貸料
임대료임대하다
īreīrētizīrētiznomātnoma
najať
najemninanajeti
hyra
เช่าค่าเช่า
kirakiralamakyırtıkkira ile tutmak
thuêtiền thuê

rent

1 [rent]
A. Nalquiler m, arriendo m (LAm)
we pay £350 in rentpagamos 350 libras de alquiler
to build flats for rentconstruir pisos para alquilarlos
"for rent" (US) → se alquila
B. VT [+ house, TV, car] → alquilar, arrendar (LAm)
to rent a flat from sbalquilar un piso a algn, arrendar un departamento a algn (LAm)
to rent a house (out) to sbalquilar una casa a algn
it is rented out at £400 a weekestá alquilado a 400 libras por semana
C. CPD rent book N (for accommodation) → librito m del alquiler
rent boy Nchapero m
rent collector Nrecaudador(a) m/f de alquileres
rent control Ncontrol m de alquileres
rent rebate Ndevolución f de alquiler
rent roll Nlista f de alquileres, total m de ingresos por alquileres

rent

2 [rent]
A. PT & PP of rend
B. N (= tear) → rasgón m, rasgadura f; (= split) → abertura f, raja f, hendedura f (fig) → escisión f, cisma m

rent

[ˈrɛnt]
nloyer m
40% of his income goes on rent → 40% de ses revenus vont dans le loyer.
to pay the rent → payer le loyer
He was evicted because he couldn't pay the rent → Il a été expulsé parce qu'il ne pouvait pas payer le loyer.
to put the rent up → augmenter le loyer
vt
[+ house, flat, room] → louer
[+ car, TV] → louer
We rented a car → Nous avons loué une voiture.
(also rent out) [+ house, room] → louer
to rent sth to sb → louer qch à qn
She rented rooms to university students → Elle loue des chambres à des étudiants.
rent out
vt sep [+ house, room] → louer; [+ boat, car] → louer

rent

:
rent boy
n (Brit inf) → Strichjunge m (inf), → Stricher m (inf)
rent collector
nMietkassierer(in) m(f)
rent control
nMietkontrolle f, → Mieterschutz m
rent-controlled
adjbewirtschaftet (form), → mit gebundener Miete
rent-free
adj advmietfrei
rent man
n (inf) = rent collector
rent rebate
nMietrückzahlung f; (= reduction)Mietnachlass mor -ermäßigung f
rent review
nNeufestsetzung fder Miete
rent strike
nMietstreik m; to go on rent, to stage a rentin den Mietstreik treten
rent tribunal
nMieterschiedsgericht nt

rent

1
n (for house, room) → Miete f; (for farm, factory) → Pacht f; for rent (US) → zu vermieten/verpachten/verleihen
vt
house, roommieten; farm, factorypachten; TV, car etcleihen; videosich (dat)ausleihen, ausleihen; we don’t own it, we only rent ites gehört uns (dat)nicht, wir haben es nur gemietet etc
(also rent out)vermieten; → verpachten; → verleihen;
vi (= rent house, room)mieten; (= rent farm, factory)pachten; (= rent TV etc)leasen; (= rent video)ausleihen

rent

2 pret, ptp of rend
n (lit, fig)Riss m; (in rock) → Spalte f

rent

[rɛnt]
1. pt, pp of rend
2. n(canone m di) affitto, pigione f
3. vt
a. (take for rent, house) → affittare, prendere in affitto; (car, TV) → noleggiare, prendere a noleggio
b. (also rent out) → affittare, dare in affitto; (car, TV) → noleggiare, dare a noleggio

rent1

(rent) noun
money paid, usually regularly, for the use of a house, shop, land etc which belongs to someone else. The rent for this flat is $50 a week.
verb
to pay or receive rent for the use of a house, shop, land etc. We rent this flat from Mr Smith; Mr Smith rents this flat to us.
ˈrental noun
1. money paid as rent. car rental.
2. the act of renting. The rental in this area is high.
rentˈ-a-car noun
1. a company that rents cars.
2. a car rented.
ˌrent-ˈfree adverb
without payment of rent. He lives there rent-free.
adjective
for which rent does not need to be paid. a rent-free flat.
rent out
to allow people to use (a house etc which one owns) in exchange for money.

see also let.

rent2

(rent) noun
an old word for a tear (in clothes etc).

rent

إيجار, يُؤَجِّرُ nájemné, pronajmout leje Miete, mieten ενοίκιο, νοικιάζω arrendar, arriendo vuokra, vuokrata louer, loyer najamnina, unajmiti affittare, affitto 賃貸する, 賃貸料 임대료, 임대하다 huren, huur leie czynsz, wynająć alugar, aluguel, aluguer арендная плата, арендовать hyra เช่า, ค่าเช่า kira, kiralamak thuê, tiền thuê 租借, 租金
References in classic literature ?
Roderigo rent his chains asunder manfully, and Hugo died in agonies of remorse and arsenic, with a wild, "Ha
It looks so cozy, so inviting and restful, whenever I pass by; and it's for rent.
I have been mocked with the likensss of sleep, while sounds of discord have rent my ears, such as might manifest the fullness of time, and that nature had forgotten her harmony.
Thank God, you earn enough to keep us, though it is sometimes close work to pay for all the oats and hay, the license, and the rent besides; but Harry will soon be earning something, and I would rather struggle on harder than we do than go back to those horrid times when you hardly had a minute to look at your own children, and we never could go to a place of worship together, or have a happy, quiet day.
But what needs tell the story, told too oft,--every day told,--of heart-strings rent and broken,--the weak broken and torn for the profit and convenience of the strong
When she could no longer pay her rent, they turned her out of doors.
These reasonings have sufficed, in a measure, to mend the rent in my conscience which I made by traveling to Baden-Baden that Sunday.
A vagrant cur- rent or a slight rise in the river had carried off their raft, but this only gratified them, since its going was something like burning the bridge between them and civilization.
She had the matter under advisement, but a doubt as to whether or not she would sell or rent her hayfields kept her from coming to a conclusion.
To be tied down to the regular payment of such a sum, on every rent day, is by no means desirable: it takes away one's independence.
Th' rent of our cottage is only one an' threepence an' it's like pullin' eye-teeth to get it.
Over a spacious lawn, and behind a black plantation of firs, the rising sun rent its way upward through piles of ragged gray cloud; heavy drops of rain fell few and far between; the March wind shuddered round the corners of the house, and the wet trees swayed wearily.