rentier

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ren·tier

 (räN-tyā′)
n.
A person who lives on income from property or investments.

[French, from rente, yearly income, from Old French; see rent1.]

rentier

(rɑ̃tje)
n
a. a person whose income consists primarily of fixed unearned amounts, such as rent or bond interest
b. (as modifier): the rentier class.
[from rente; see rent1]

rentier

- A person who makes income from rent.
See also related terms for rent.

rentier

A French word meaning someone who rents, used to mean a person whose income comes from regular unearned amounts such as from rent payments.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rentier - someone whose income is from property rents or bond interest and other investments
investor - someone who commits capital in order to gain financial returns
Translations

rentier

[ˈrɒntɪeɪ] Nrentista mf
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References in periodicals archive ?
Invoking a literary giant, Rentiers told readers that "some politicians think like the pigs from George Orwell's book Animal Farm where the ruling pigs said 'All animals are equal, but some are more equal than others.
The rentiers "specialize" in financial speculation, overseas investments via private equity firms, extravagant consumption of high-end luxury goods and billion-dollar and billion-euro secret private accounts in overseas banks.
They also called for an economic revival by encouraging development and productivity through the implementation of a "just tax" which is to be directly imposed on rentiers making huge profits on real estate speculation.
In capitalism, taxation is also a part of the settlement with the state's creditors--the rentiers, whose dividends are believed to be secured by taxation' (p.
Surely it's more a case that high property prices mean that Ludlow is home to a much higher than average population of rentiers, well-off retirees and ladies of a certain age with good divorce settlements behind them.
The despotic monarchy in France, meanwhile, learned that while it could clip coins and sell offices and tides to rentiers, it could not match the English in raising low coupon debt.