renting


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rent 1

 (rĕnt)
n.
1.
a. Payment, usually of an amount fixed by contract, made by a tenant at specified intervals in return for the right to occupy or use the property of another.
b. A similar payment made for the use of a facility, equipment, or service provided by another.
2. The return derived from cultivated or improved land after deduction of all production costs.
3. The difference between the price paid for use of a resource whose supply is inelastic and the minimum price at which that resource would still be provided. Also called economic rent.
v. rent·ed, rent·ing, rents
v.tr.
1. To obtain occupancy or use of (another's property) in return for regular payments.
2. To grant temporary occupancy or use of (one's own property or a service) in return for regular payments: rents out TV sets.
v.intr.
To be for rent: The cottage rents for $1,200 a month.
Idiom:
for rent
Available for use or service in return for payment.

[Middle English rente, from Old French, from Vulgar Latin *rendita, from feminine past participle of *rendere, to yield, return; see render.]

rent′a·bil′i·ty n.
rent′a·ble adj.

rent 2

 (rĕnt)
v.
A past tense and a past participle of rend.
n.
1. An opening made by rending; a rip.
2. A breach of relations between persons or groups; a rift.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.renting - the act of paying for the use of something (as an apartment or house or car)renting - the act of paying for the use of something (as an apartment or house or car)
transaction, dealing, dealings - the act of transacting within or between groups (as carrying on commercial activities); "no transactions are possible without him"; "he has always been honest is his dealings with me"
auto, automobile, car, motorcar, machine - a motor vehicle with four wheels; usually propelled by an internal combustion engine; "he needs a car to get to work"
Translations

renting

[ˈrentɪŋ] Narrendamiento m
References in classic literature ?
This was not a deed of sale at all, so far as he could see--it provided only for the renting of the property
They were a family of the name of Martin, whom Emma well knew by character, as renting a large farm of Mr.
This system may have cost from twenty to fifty millions, yet it may be hired for one-eighth the cost of renting an automobile.
We once carried out a small matter of renting some chambers for him when he was the Honorable Arthur Holmwood.
It was at length arranged that we should live together during my stay in the city; and as my worldly circumstances were somewhat less embarrassed than his own, I was permitted to be at the expense of renting, and furnishing in a style which suited the rather fantastic gloom of our common temper, a time-eaten and grotesque mansion, long deserted through superstitions into which we did not inquire, and tottering to its fall in a retired and desolate portion of the Faubourg St.
As Mr Shepherd perceived that this connexion of the Crofts did them no service with Sir Walter, he mentioned it no more; returning, with all his zeal, to dwell on the circumstances more indisputably in their favour; their age, and number, and fortune; the high idea they had formed of Kellynch Hall, and extreme solicitude for the advantage of renting it; making it appear as if they ranked nothing beyond the happiness of being the tenants of Sir Walter Elliot: an extraordinary taste, certainly, could they have been supposed in the secret of Sir Walter's estimate of the dues of a tenant.
As it had rained all day and her employer wanted her to begin the next morning, she had the best possible excuse for renting a room in Fallon and asking Bill to ride in horseback with some things which she would ask Aunt Rose, over the telephone, to pack.
The family had five allotments, besides renting other land.
It was noted, in following years, that several leaders of workmen built themselves houses and blocks of renting flats and took trips to the old countries, while, more immediately, other leaders and "dark horses" came to political preferment and the control of the municipal government and the municipal moneys.