renunciation

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Related to renunciants: Renunciate, renounces

re·nun·ci·a·tion

 (rĭ-nŭn′sē-ā′shən)
n.
1. The act or an instance of renouncing: the renunciation of all earthly pleasures.
2. A declaration in which something is renounced.

[Middle English, from Anglo-Norman renunciacion, from Latin renūntiātiō, renūntiātiōn-, from renūntiātus, past participle of renūntiāre, to renounce; see renounce.]

re·nun′ci·a′tive, re·nun′ci·a·to′ry (-ə-tôr′ē) adj.

renunciation

(rɪˌnʌnsɪˈeɪʃən)
n
1. the act or an instance of renouncing
2. a formal declaration renouncing something
3. (Stock Exchange) stock exchange the surrender to another of the rights to buy new shares in a rights issue
[C14: from Latin renunciātiō a declaration, from renuntiāre to report, renounce]
reˈnunciative, reˈnunciatory adj

re•nun•ci•a•tion

(rɪˌnʌn siˈeɪ ʃən, -ʃi-)

n.
an act or instance of renouncing something.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin renūntiātiō proclamation]
re•nun′ci•a•to`ry (-əˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i) adj.

Renunciation


the formal act by a regent of resigning from his position.
the act of renouncing upon oath, such as an alien applying for citizenship renouncing allegiance to a former country of nationality.
the process of abandoning one’s native land or of being exiled. — expatriate, n., adj., v.
recusancy. — recusant, adj.
resistance to authority or refusal to conform, especially in religious matters, used of English Catholics who refuse to attend the services of the Church of England. Also recusance.recusant, n., adj.
1. the act or process of subterfuge or evasion.
2. the abandoning of a cause or belief; apostasy. — tergiversator, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.renunciation - rejecting or disowning or disclaiming as invalidrenunciation - rejecting or disowning or disclaiming as invalid; "Congressional repudiation of the treaty that the President had negotiated"
rejection - the speech act of rejecting
disclaimer - (law) a voluntary repudiation of a person's legal claim to something
disowning, disownment - refusal to acknowledge as one's own
2.renunciation - the state of having rejected your religious beliefs or your political party or a cause (often in favor of opposing beliefs or causes)
rejection - the state of being rejected
3.renunciation - an act (spoken or written) declaring that something is surrendered or disowned
resignation - the act of giving up (a claim or office or possession etc.)
relinquishing, relinquishment - a verbal act of renouncing a claim or right or position etc.
4.renunciation - the act of renouncing; sacrificing or giving up or surrendering (a possession or right or title or privilege etc.)
rejection - the act of rejecting something; "his proposals were met with rejection"
forsaking, giving up - the act of forsaking
self-abnegation, self-renunciation, abnegation, self-denial, denial - renunciation of your own interests in favor of the interests of others

renunciation

renunciation

noun
A giving up of a possession, claim, or right:
Translations
تَخَلٍّ، تَنازُل عن، تَرْك، تَزَهُّد
odřeknutí se
afkaldafsværgelseforsagelse
afneitun
bırakmavazgeçme

renunciation

[rɪˌnʌnsɪˈeɪʃən] Nrenuncia f

renunciation

[rɪˌnʌnsiˈeɪʃən] n
(= giving up) [power, title] → renonciation f; [violence, methods] → renonciation f
renunciation of sth → renonciation à qch
renunciation of violence → renonciation à la violence
(= self-denial) → renoncement m

renunciation

n (of title, right, violence)Verzicht m (→ of auf (+acc)), → Aufgabe f; (of terrorism)Aufgabe f; (of religion, devil, faith)Abschwören nt; (Rel: of world) → Entsagung f; (of opinion, cause, treaty)Leugnung f; (of friend)Verleugnung f

renunciation

[rɪˌnʌnsɪˈeɪʃn] n (of right, claim, title) → rinuncia; (of violence, terrorism) → abbandono; (of faith) → abiura

renounce

(riˈnauns) verb
1. to give up (a title, claim, intention etc) especially formally or publicly. He renounced his claim to the throne.
2. to say especially formally or publicly that one will no longer have anything to do with (something). I have renounced alcohol.
renunciation (rinansiˈeiʃən) noun
References in periodicals archive ?
This then leads her (73) to the assumption that, even though the ability of women to reach the final goal is regularly affirmed, (62) "women renunciants are denied designation by the title because donors are less enthusiastic about giving to arahant petitioners who also happen to be women.
In 1971 he began to call himself Bhagwan--the 'blessed one' or 'God'--and built an Ashram in Poona, where he hoped to begin a 'utopian community' of renunciants (sannyasins).
However, in contrast to the dharmasastras, Jain authorities maintain that it is possible for women to live a virtuous life even as renunciants, outside of the protective web of the family.
In fact, the homes for renunciants will be off limits for you if you're anything but a " reliable" Indian by nationality.
Swallowing gasoline and striking flint to wick is a different story, but these days the poets are leaving that route up to the renunciants in orange robes.
Put another way, people are confident that an established Buddhist order would be responsible for its members as being respected renunciants.
This, according to Ngai, is the result of other scholars projecting their own valorizations of formal citizenship onto the renunciants (198).
For further discussion of female renunciants in Sanskrit literature, and an assessment of their importance for feminist scholarship, see Ruth Vanita, "The Self Is Not Gendered: Sulabha's Debate with King Janaka," NWSA Journal 15, no.
77) It took many more years before the renunciants had their American citizenship restored.
Renunciants, by the nature of their chosen vocation, have long stood as antitheses to a material-seeking approach to life that has been a dominant aspect of urban societies, and this is especially true with respect to males.
Nuns' identity as renunciants is visible in their vows, appearance, and nomenclature (see Salgado 2004).
As the composition of the disciples has shifted from Indian renunciants to lay followers and even Western seekers, the boundaries of discipleship have become more porous, with greater freedom retained by disciples about their levels of commitment and engagement in transformative practice.