renunciation


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re·nun·ci·a·tion

 (rĭ-nŭn′sē-ā′shən)
n.
1. The act or an instance of renouncing: the renunciation of all earthly pleasures.
2. A declaration in which something is renounced.

[Middle English, from Anglo-Norman renunciacion, from Latin renūntiātiō, renūntiātiōn-, from renūntiātus, past participle of renūntiāre, to renounce; see renounce.]

re·nun′ci·a′tive, re·nun′ci·a·to′ry (-ə-tôr′ē) adj.

renunciation

(rɪˌnʌnsɪˈeɪʃən)
n
1. the act or an instance of renouncing
2. a formal declaration renouncing something
3. (Stock Exchange) stock exchange the surrender to another of the rights to buy new shares in a rights issue
[C14: from Latin renunciātiō a declaration, from renuntiāre to report, renounce]
reˈnunciative, reˈnunciatory adj

re•nun•ci•a•tion

(rɪˌnʌn siˈeɪ ʃən, -ʃi-)

n.
an act or instance of renouncing something.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin renūntiātiō proclamation]
re•nun′ci•a•to`ry (-əˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i) adj.

Renunciation


the formal act by a regent of resigning from his position.
the act of renouncing upon oath, such as an alien applying for citizenship renouncing allegiance to a former country of nationality.
the process of abandoning one’s native land or of being exiled. — expatriate, n., adj., v.
recusancy. — recusant, adj.
resistance to authority or refusal to conform, especially in religious matters, used of English Catholics who refuse to attend the services of the Church of England. Also recusance.recusant, n., adj.
1. the act or process of subterfuge or evasion.
2. the abandoning of a cause or belief; apostasy. — tergiversator, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.renunciation - rejecting or disowning or disclaiming as invalidrenunciation - rejecting or disowning or disclaiming as invalid; "Congressional repudiation of the treaty that the President had negotiated"
rejection - the speech act of rejecting
disclaimer - (law) a voluntary repudiation of a person's legal claim to something
disowning, disownment - refusal to acknowledge as one's own
2.renunciation - the state of having rejected your religious beliefs or your political party or a cause (often in favor of opposing beliefs or causes)
rejection - the state of being rejected
3.renunciation - an act (spoken or written) declaring that something is surrendered or disowned
resignation - the act of giving up (a claim or office or possession etc.)
relinquishing, relinquishment - a verbal act of renouncing a claim or right or position etc.
4.renunciation - the act of renouncing; sacrificing or giving up or surrendering (a possession or right or title or privilege etc.)
rejection - the act of rejecting something; "his proposals were met with rejection"
forsaking, giving up - the act of forsaking
self-abnegation, self-renunciation, abnegation, self-denial, denial - renunciation of your own interests in favor of the interests of others

renunciation

renunciation

noun
A giving up of a possession, claim, or right:
Translations
تَخَلٍّ، تَنازُل عن، تَرْك، تَزَهُّد
odřeknutí se
afkaldafsværgelseforsagelse
afneitun
bırakmavazgeçme

renunciation

[rɪˌnʌnsɪˈeɪʃən] Nrenuncia f

renunciation

[rɪˌnʌnsiˈeɪʃən] n
(= giving up) [power, title] → renonciation f; [violence, methods] → renonciation f
renunciation of sth → renonciation à qch
renunciation of violence → renonciation à la violence
(= self-denial) → renoncement m

renunciation

n (of title, right, violence)Verzicht m (→ of auf (+acc)), → Aufgabe f; (of terrorism)Aufgabe f; (of religion, devil, faith)Abschwören nt; (Rel: of world) → Entsagung f; (of opinion, cause, treaty)Leugnung f; (of friend)Verleugnung f

renunciation

[rɪˌnʌnsɪˈeɪʃn] n (of right, claim, title) → rinuncia; (of violence, terrorism) → abbandono; (of faith) → abiura

renounce

(riˈnauns) verb
1. to give up (a title, claim, intention etc) especially formally or publicly. He renounced his claim to the throne.
2. to say especially formally or publicly that one will no longer have anything to do with (something). I have renounced alcohol.
renunciation (rinansiˈeiʃən) noun
References in classic literature ?
At the crucial instant of renunciation she was greatly helped by the reflection that she closely resembled the heathen mothers who cast their babes to the crocodiles in the Ganges.
He knew very well, that in his love for Lucie, his renunciation of his social place, though by no means new to his own mind, had been hurried and incomplete.
She had been undecided, on leaving Dover, whether or no to give the finishing touch to that renunciation of mankind in which she had been educated, by marrying a pilot; but she decided against that venture.
But he had not moral courage enough to contemplate that active renunciation of Nancy as possible for him: he had only conscience and heart enough to make him for ever uneasy under the weakness that forbade the renunciation.
said Trefusis, apparently disapproving strongly of the renunciation.
After mass we applied ourselves again to catechise, to instruct, and receive the renunciation of their errors, scarce allowing ourselves time to make a scanty meal, which we never did more than once a day.
And Lycurgus, more true to his object, was under the necessity of mixing a portion of violence with the authority of superstition, and of securing his final success by a voluntary renunciation, first of his country, and then of his life.
For a moment love had lifted him to sublime heights of honor and renunciation.
with what sincere renunciation I locked the door by which I had so often gone and come, and ground the key under my heel!
As it was--having with all his three livings no more than seven hundred a-year, and seeing no way of keeping his splendid mother and his sickly sister, not to reckon a second sister, who was usually spoken of without any adjective, in such ladylike ease as became their birth and habits, and at the same time providing for a family of his own--he remained, you see, at the age of eight-and-forty, a bachelor, not making any merit of that renunciation, but saying laughingly, if any one alluded to it, that he made it an excuse for many indulgences which a wife would never have allowed him.
Madame de Cintre's strange intensity had in fact struck a chill to his heart; her face, still impressed upon his vision, had been a terribly vivid image of renunciation.
It was incontestable that, whether for right or for wrong, most readers of certain of Aspern's poems (poems not as ambiguous as the sonnets--scarcely more divine, I think-- of Shakespeare) had taken for granted that Juliana had not always adhered to the steep footway of renunciation.