reorchestration

reorchestration

(ˌriːɔːkɪsˈtreɪʃən)
n
the act of reorchestrating or rearranging, a rearrangement
References in periodicals archive ?
Meme le principe de mimetisme qui faconne un grand nombre de situations d'apprentissage suppose toujours une transposition de la gestualite et une reorchestration adaptative de celle-ci.
Jason Carr did the reorchestration, which is considerably more successful than his reduction of "A Little Night Music" across the street.
With the exception of Maurice Ravel's work with him on the reorchestration of Modest Mussorgsky's Khovanshchina in 1913 and the various ballets the Russian expatriate developed with George Balanchine, Stravinsky rarely admitted to productive collaborative experiences.
The reorchestration of the archive that has occurred here is not the exception, but the rule.
Here it does a little of both: Through a canny reorchestration of the old "bait and switch" routine, the owl, a mortal danger to the individual songbird, is instead employed to trap the species en masse, as, rather than flee, they gather together to defeat their common enemy.
They say they made the ones they wanted, including some minor trims and reorchestration, between the Calgary and Banff productions.
Or a lavish, totally unrepresentative reorchestration by a Romantic dogooder?
Marilyn Marks Rubin, "Can Reorchestration of Historical Themes Reinvent Government?
Rubin, Marilyn Marks 1994 "Can Reorchestration of Historical Themes Reinvent Government?
there had been a conversation with Benjamin Britten, who had expressed himself to be keenly interested in the idea of doing a reorchestration of the Purcell 'Faery Queen'.