reparation


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rep·a·ra·tion

 (rĕp′ə-rā′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of making amends for a wrong.
2. Something done or money paid to make amends or compensate for a wrong.
3. reparations Compensation or remuneration, as for damage or economic loss, required from a nation defeated in war.
4. The act or process of repairing or the condition of being repaired.

[Middle English reparacion, from Old French, from Late Latin reparātiō, reparātiōn-, restoration, from Latin reparātus, past participle of reparāre, to repair; see repair1.]

reparation

(ˌrɛpəˈreɪʃən)
n
1. the act or process of making amends: an injury admitting of no reparation.
2. (usually plural) compensation exacted as an indemnity from a defeated nation by the victors: esp the compensation demanded of Germany by the Treaty of Versailles after World War I
3. the act or process of repairing or state of having been repaired
[C14 reparacioun, ultimately from Latin reparāre to repair1]
reparative, reˈparatory adj

rep•a•ra•tion

(ˌrɛp əˈreɪ ʃən)

n.
1. the making of amends for wrong or injury done.
2. Usu., reparations. compensation payable by a defeated nation to the victor for damages or loss suffered during war.
3. restoration to good condition.
[1350–1400; reparacion < Middle French < Late Latin reparātiō < Latin reparā(re) to repair1]
syn: See redress.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reparation - compensation (given or received) for an insult or injury; "an act for which there is no reparation"
compensation - something (such as money) given or received as payment or reparation (as for a service or loss or injury)
2.reparation - (usually plural) compensation exacted from a defeated nation by the victors; "Germany was unable to pay the reparations demanded after World War I"
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
compensation - something (such as money) given or received as payment or reparation (as for a service or loss or injury)
3.reparation - the act of putting something in working order againreparation - the act of putting something in working order again
improvement - the act of improving something; "their improvements increased the value of the property"
darning - the act of mending a hole in a garment with crossing threads
patching - the act of mending a hole in a garment by sewing a patch over it
maintenance, upkeep, care - activity involved in maintaining something in good working order; "he wrote the manual on car care"
quick fix, quickie, quicky, band aid - hurried repair
restoration - the act of restoring something or someone to a satisfactory state
reconstruction - the activity of constructing something again
restitution - the act of restoring something to its original state
4.reparation - something done or paid in expiation of a wrongreparation - something done or paid in expiation of a wrong; "how can I make amends"
atonement, expiation, propitiation - the act of atoning for sin or wrongdoing (especially appeasing a deity)

reparation

noun compensation, damages, repair, satisfaction, amends, renewal, redress, indemnity, restitution, atonement, recompense, propitiation, requital a demand amongst victims for some sort of reparation

reparation

noun
Translations
إصلاح، تَصْليح، تَرْميمتَعْويض
odškodněníoprava
erstatningoprejsning
bæturskaîabætur
odškodnenie
onarmatazminat

reparation

[ˌrepəˈreɪʃən] Nreparación f
to make reparation to sb for sthindemnizar a algn por algo

reparation

[ˌrɛpəˈreɪʃən]
n (= payment) → réparation f
reparations npl (after a war)réparations fpl
war reparations → réparations de guerre

reparation

n (for damage) → Entschädigung f; (usu pl: after war) → Reparationen pl; (for wrong, misdeed) → Wiedergutmachung f; to make reparation for somethingetw wiedergutmachen

reparation

[ˌrɛpəˈreɪʃn] n (frm) → riparazione f
to make reparation for sth → riparare a qc

repair

(riˈpeə) verb
1. to mend; to make (something) that is damaged or has broken down work again; to restore to good condition. to repair a broken lock / torn jacket.
2. to put right or make up for. Nothing can repair the harm done by your foolish remarks.
noun
1. (often in plural) the act of repairing something damaged or broken down. I put my car into the garage for repairs; The bridge is under repair.
2. a condition or state. The road is in bad repair; The house is in a good state of repair.
reˈpairable adjective
(negative unrepairable) able to be mended.
reparable (ˈrepərəbl) adjective
able to be put right.
ˌrepaˈration (repə-) noun
1. the act of making up for something wrong that has been done.
2. money paid for this purpose.
reˈpairman (-mӕn) noun
a man who repairs televisions etc.
References in classic literature ?
After such wrong as he had suffered, there is no reparation.
We have more than the rights of common men;--we have the claim of an injured race for reparation.
These were great concessions;--but where Marianne felt that she had injured, no reparation could be too much for her to make.
The duty done, and act of reparation performed, which can alone enable me to contemplate my fellow mortal, I shall be known no more.
As soon as I arrived, I sent a penitential codfish and barrel of oysters to Joe (as reparation for not having gone myself), and then went on to Barnard's Inn.
The ebb-tide, which had so cruelly delayed us, was now making reparation and delaying our assailants.
Search your memory, and if you find anything of this kind you need only tell me of it, and I promise you by the order of knighthood which I have received to procure you satisfaction and reparation to the utmost of your desire.
And you were deceived, my dear sir," replied Aramis, coldly, very little sensible to the reparation.
If it be so," replied the magistrate, "rely upon every reparation being made; meanwhile, I am the bearer of an order of arrest, and although I most reluctantly perform the task assigned me, it must, nevertheless, be fulfilled.
That proof satisfied him so completely that, as a sign of satisfaction, he has sent me, as your majesty may see, to consider with you what reparation should be made to gentlemen unjustly treated and wrongfully persecuted.
The man shall make whatever reparation is possible.
Such appellants, unsupported by money, interest, or power, seldom make out a very strong case for reparation of any sort, in this righteous world of ours, and had it not been for the goodness of the dauphine it is probable that the vicomtesse and her grand-daughter would have been reduced to downright beggary.