repel

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Related to repeled: repealed

re·pel

 (rĭ-pĕl′)
v. re·pelled, re·pel·ling, re·pels
v.tr.
1. To ward off or keep away; drive back: repel insects.
2. To offer resistance to; fight against: repel an invasion.
3. To refuse to accept or submit to; reject: a company that was trying to repel a hostile takeover.
4. To refuse to accept (someone); spurn.
5. To cause aversion or distaste in: Your rudeness repels everyone. See Synonyms at disgust. See Usage Note at repulse.
6. To be resistant to; be incapable of absorbing or mixing with: Oil repels water.
7. Physics To present an opposing force to; push back or away from by a force: Electric charges of the same sign repel one another.
v.intr.
1. To offer a resistant force to something.
2. To cause aversion or distaste: behavior that repels.

[Middle English repellen, from Old French repeller, from Latin repellere : re-, re- + pellere, to drive; see pel- in Indo-European roots.]

re·pel′ler n.

repel

(rɪˈpɛl)
vb (mainly tr) , -pels, -pelling or -pelled
1. to force or drive back (something or somebody, esp an attacker)
2. (also intr) to produce a feeling of aversion or distaste in (someone or something); be disgusting (to)
3. to push aside; dismiss: he repelled the suggestion as wrong and impossible.
4. to be effective in keeping away, controlling, or resisting: an aerosol spray that repels flies.
5. to have no affinity for; fail to mix with or absorb: water and oil repel each other.
6. to disdain to accept (something); turn away from or spurn: she repelled his advances.
7. (General Physics) (also intr) to exert an opposing force on (something): an electric charge repels another charge of the same sign.
[C15: from Latin repellere, from re- + pellere to push, drive]
reˈpeller n
Usage: See at repulse

re•pel

(rɪˈpɛl)

v. -pelled, -pel•ling. v.t.
1. to drive or force back (an assailant, invader, etc.).
2. to thrust back or away.
3. to fail to mix with: Water and oil repel each other.
4. to resist the absorption of: This coat repels rain.
5. to cause distaste or aversion in.
6. to push away by a force (opposed to attract): The north pole of one magnet will repel the north pole of another.
v.i.
7. to act with a force that drives or keeps away something.
8. to cause distaste or aversion.
[1350–1400; Middle English repellen < Latin repellere to drive back =re- re- + pellere to drive, push; compare repulse]
re•pel′len•cy, n.
re•pel′ler, n.

repel


Past participle: repelled
Gerund: repelling

Imperative
repel
repel
Present
I repel
you repel
he/she/it repels
we repel
you repel
they repel
Preterite
I repelled
you repelled
he/she/it repelled
we repelled
you repelled
they repelled
Present Continuous
I am repelling
you are repelling
he/she/it is repelling
we are repelling
you are repelling
they are repelling
Present Perfect
I have repelled
you have repelled
he/she/it has repelled
we have repelled
you have repelled
they have repelled
Past Continuous
I was repelling
you were repelling
he/she/it was repelling
we were repelling
you were repelling
they were repelling
Past Perfect
I had repelled
you had repelled
he/she/it had repelled
we had repelled
you had repelled
they had repelled
Future
I will repel
you will repel
he/she/it will repel
we will repel
you will repel
they will repel
Future Perfect
I will have repelled
you will have repelled
he/she/it will have repelled
we will have repelled
you will have repelled
they will have repelled
Future Continuous
I will be repelling
you will be repelling
he/she/it will be repelling
we will be repelling
you will be repelling
they will be repelling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been repelling
you have been repelling
he/she/it has been repelling
we have been repelling
you have been repelling
they have been repelling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been repelling
you will have been repelling
he/she/it will have been repelling
we will have been repelling
you will have been repelling
they will have been repelling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been repelling
you had been repelling
he/she/it had been repelling
we had been repelling
you had been repelling
they had been repelling
Conditional
I would repel
you would repel
he/she/it would repel
we would repel
you would repel
they would repel
Past Conditional
I would have repelled
you would have repelled
he/she/it would have repelled
we would have repelled
you would have repelled
they would have repelled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.repel - cause to move back by force or influence; "repel the enemy"; "push back the urge to smoke"; "beat back the invaders"
drive - cause to move rapidly by striking or throwing with force; "drive the ball far out into the field"
push, force - move with force, "He pushed the table into a corner"
attract, pull in, draw in, pull, draw - direct toward itself or oneself by means of some psychological power or physical attributes; "Her good looks attract the stares of many men"; "The ad pulled in many potential customers"; "This pianist pulls huge crowds"; "The store owner was happy that the ad drew in many new customers"
2.repel - be repellent to; cause aversion in
churn up, sicken, disgust, nauseate, revolt - cause aversion in; offend the moral sense of; "The pornographic pictures sickened us"
put off, turn off - cause to feel intense dislike or distaste
displease - give displeasure to
attract, appeal - be attractive to; "The idea of a vacation appeals to me"; "The beautiful garden attracted many people"
3.repel - force or drive back; "repel the attacker"; "fight off the onslaught"; "rebuff the attack"
fight down, oppose, fight, fight back, defend - fight against or resist strongly; "The senator said he would oppose the bill"; "Don't fight it!"
4.repel - reject outright and bluntly; "She snubbed his proposal"
freeze off, spurn, pooh-pooh, disdain, scorn, turn down, reject - reject with contempt; "She spurned his advances"
5.repel - fill with distaste; "This spoilt food disgusts me"
excite, stir, stimulate - stir feelings in; "stimulate my appetite"; "excite the audience"; "stir emotions"
nauseate, turn one's stomach, sicken - upset and make nauseated; "The smell of the food turned the pregnant woman's stomach"; "The mold on the food sickened the diners"

repel

verb
2. disgust, offend, revolt, sicken, nauseate, put you off, make you sick, gross out (U.S. slang), turn you off (informal), make you shudder, turn your stomach, give you the creeps (informal) excitement which frightened and repelled her
disgust draw, please, attract, invite, delight, fascinate, entrance see repulse

repel

verb
1. To turn or drive away:
2. To offend the senses or feelings of:
Translations
يَدْفَعيَرُد، يَصُديَنْفُر، يَشْمَئِز
odpuditodpuzovatodrazitzahnat
afvisefrastøde
taszítvisszataszít
hrekja; standasthrinda frá sérvekja viîbjóî/andúî
atremti
atgrūstatsistatstumtatvairītšķebināt
odpudiťodpudzovať
defetmekiğrendirmekitmekkendinden uzaklaştırmakpüskürtmek

repel

[rɪˈpel]
A. VT
1. (= force back) → repeler, rechazar
2. (= disgust) → repugnar, dar asco a
he repels meme da asco, me repugna
it repels me to have to + INFINme repugna tener que + infin
B. VIrepelerse mutuamente

repel

[rɪˈpɛl] vt
(= disgust) → dégoûter
(= push back) [+ advance, invader] → repousser

repel

vt
enemy, attackzurückschlagen; sb’s advances, insects, fliesabwehren; waterabstoßen
(= disgust)abstoßen
vi (= disgust)abstoßen

repel

[rɪˈpɛl] vt (frm) (force back) → respingere; (disgust) → ripugnare a

repel

(rəˈpel) past tense, past participle reˈpelled verb
1. to resist or fight (an enemy) successfully. to repel invaders.
2. to cause a feeling of dislike or disgust. She was repelled by his dirty appearance.
3. to force to move away. Oil repels water.