repertoire


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rep·er·toire

 (rĕp′ər-twär′)
n.
1. The stock of songs, plays, operas, readings, or other pieces that a player or company is prepared to perform.
2. The class of compositions in a genre: has excellent command of the chanteuse repertoire.
3. The range or number of skills, aptitudes, or special accomplishments of a particular person or group.

[French répertoire, from Old French, from Late Latin repertōrium; see repertory.]

repertoire

(ˈrɛpəˌtwɑː)
n
1. all the plays, songs, operas, or other works collectively that a company, actor, singer, dancer, etc, has prepared and is competent to perform
2. the entire stock of things available in a field or of a kind: the comedian's repertoire of jokes was becoming stale.
3. (Theatre) in repertoire denoting the performance of two or more plays, ballets, etc, by the same company in the same venue on different evenings over a period of time: "Nutcracker" returns to Covent Garden over Christmas in repertoire with "Giselle".
[C19: from French, from Late Latin repertōrium inventory; see repertory]

rep•er•toire

(ˈrɛp ərˌtwɑr, -ˌtwɔr)

n.
1. all the works that a performing company or artist is prepared to present.
2. the entire stock of works in a particular artistic field: the theatrical repertoire.
3. the skills, techniques, etc., used in a particular field or occupation.
[1840–50; < French < Late Latin repertōrium catalogue. See repertory]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.repertoire - the entire range of skills or aptitudes or devices used in a particular field or occupation; "the repertory of the supposed feats of mesmerism"; "has a large repertory of dialects and characters"
aggregation, collection, accumulation, assemblage - several things grouped together or considered as a whole
2.repertoire - a collection of works (plays, songs, operas, ballets) that an artist or company can perform and do perform for short intervals on a regular schedule
aggregation, collection, accumulation, assemblage - several things grouped together or considered as a whole

repertoire

noun range, list, stock, supply, store, collection, repertory, repository an impressive repertoire of funny stories
Translations

repertoire

[ˈrepətwɑːʳ] N [of songs, jokes] → repertorio m

repertoire

[ˈrɛpərtwɑːr] n
[actor, musician] → répertoire m
(fig)répertoire m

repertoire

n (Theat, Mus) → Repertoire nt

repertoire

[ˈrɛpətwɑːʳ] nrepertorio
References in classic literature ?
Young Jefferson only learnt to play one tune on those bagpipes; but I never heard any complaints about the insufficiency of his repertoire - none whatever.
Nor did the place lose money, for no one left, and the crowd increased to standing room as Michael went through his repertoire of "God Save the King," "Sweet Bye and Bye," "Lead, Kindly Light," "Home, Sweet Home," and "Shenandoah.
Shaw considered her "sweet songs" quite unfit for a fashionable young lady's repertoire.
He was deaf to the waltzes; they grew fainter and fainter; the discomfited performer left the huge instrument presently; and though her three friends performed some of the loudest and most brilliant new pieces of their repertoire, she did not hear a single note, but sate thinking, and boding evil.
Emphasis: Improvisation, pedagogy, repertoire, sight reading, theory and Dalcroze methods.
It is still--and not just at festival time--dominated by the elusive but very active presence of the Bournonville repertoire, recently and aptly described by John Rockwell in The New York Times as constituting the company's "blessing and its curse.
Our achievement this year is the result of the extraordinary success and popularity of the repertoire created by BMI's songwriters and composers, and of continued strength in BMI's licensing efforts," said Preston.
The piano duet often is a student's first chamber music experience and can be an invaluable enhancement of the solo piano repertoire.
Among them are discovering fresh facets of still-evolving choreographers and watching new dancers put their own stamp on familiar repertoire.
The T cell repertoire, a measure of the ability of T cells to react with a broad variety of targets, was also normalized at one month following transplant in 4 of the 5 patients in whom it was measured, in contrast to the markedly abnormal repertoire typically seen for a year or more in patients with multiple myeloma following autologous stem cell transplantation.
La mediatheque de la Cite de la musique vient de numeriser et mettre en ligne le repertoire de references de partitions [much less than] 10 ans avec la contrebasse [much greater than].
5, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Locally-owned Travel Repertoire has signed an affiliation agreement with Travel Experts, Inc.

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