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tr.v. re·placed, re·plac·ing, re·plac·es
1. To put back into a former position or place: replaced the sofa after vacuuming.
2. To take the place of or fill the role of: Jets have largely replaced propeller planes.
3. To provide a substitute for (something broken or unsatisfactory, for example): replace a spark plug; replace a team's coach.
4. To pay back or return; refund: They were forced to replace the money they stole.

re·place′a·ble adj.
re·plac′er n.
Synonyms: replace, supersede, supplant
These verbs mean to put someone or something in the place of another. To replace is to be or to furnish an equivalent or substitute, especially for one that has been lost, depleted, worn out, or discharged: "A conspiracy was carefully engineered to replace the Directory by three 'Consuls'" (H.G. Wells).
To supersede is to replace one person or thing by another held to be more valuable or useful, or less antiquated: "In our island the Latin appears never to have superseded the old Gaelic speech" (Thomas Macaulay).
Supplant often suggests the use of intrigue or underhanded tactics to take another's place: "The rivaling poor Jones, and supplanting him in her affections, added another spur to his pursuit" (Henry Fielding).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.replacing - the act of furnishing an equivalent person or thing in the place of anotherreplacing - the act of furnishing an equivalent person or thing in the place of another; "replacing the star will not be easy"
substitution, commutation, exchange - the act of putting one thing or person in the place of another: "he sent Smith in for Jones but the substitution came too late to help"
novation - (law) the replacement of one obligation by another by mutual agreement of both parties; usually the replacement of one of the original parties to a contract with the consent of the remaining party
pitching change - replacing a pitcher in baseball
supersedure, supersession - act of replacing one person or thing by another especially one held to be superior
displacement, supplanting - act of taking the place of another especially using underhanded tactics
References in classic literature ?
I think we've been queer long enough," he declared, going to the showcase and replacing the revolver.
I see a good chance now," added Ned, who had taken the small charge from his weapon, replacing it with a heavier one.
She smiled, as if in pity at her own momentary forgetfulness, discovering by the act a row of teeth that would have shamed the purest ivory; when, replacing the veil, she bowed her face, and rode in silence, like one whose thoughts were abstracted from the scene around her.
For besides the great length of the whaling voyage, the numerous articles peculiar to the prosecution of the fishery, and the impossibility of replacing them at the remote harbors usually frequented, it must be remembered, that of all ships, whaling vessels are the most exposed to accidents of all kinds, and especially to the destruction and loss of the very things upon which the success of the voyage most depends.
All the year round they had been serving as cogs in the great packing machine; and now was the time for the renovating of it, and the replacing of damaged parts.
looking at the book again, and replacing it on the table), he would consider it as the proudest moment of his life.
Should any little accidental disappointment of the appetite occur, such as the spoiling of a meal, the under or the over dressing of a dish, the incident ought not to be neutralised by replacing with something more delicate the comfort lost, thus pampering the body and obviating the aim of this institution; it ought to be improved to the spiritual edification of the pupils, by encouraging them to evince fortitude under temporary privation.
Heathcliff had opened the trinket and cast out its contents, replacing them by a black lock of his own.
observed Miss Mowcher, standing at the chair again, and replacing in the bag a miscellaneous collection of little objects she had emptied out of it.
Replacing his javelin, he resumed his seat, bent his looks downward, and appeared to be absorbed in melancholy reflection.
Mifroid, replacing his gleaming glasses on his nose, fixed the stage-manager with a contemplative stare.
But the longer Bell toiled at his musical telegraph, the more he dreamed of replacing the telegraph and its cumbrous sign-language by a new machine that would carry, not dots and dashes, but the human voice.