repossession order

Translations

repossession order

[ˌriːpəˈzɛʃnˌɔːdəʳ] n (for house) → ordine m di espropriazione
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References in periodicals archive ?
I have instructed a barrister to go to court and file to reverse the repossession order.
However, their occupation of the room in the Rootes Building was brought to an end on Friday night after Birmingham High Court granted Warwick University offi-cials a repossession order.
In a statement which Ms Burke read to the court Ms Irelade said the terms of the repossession order entitled them to enter the property and she went upstairs where she "saw a male hanging from the loft hatch.
A LAST-ditch appeal by Carson Yeung's 80-year-old mother failed to stop a Hong Kong judge from slapping a repossession order on his pounds 12 million luxury mansion.
issued a repossession order for the town's only trash truck, leaving 462 residences with the smelly prospect of overflowing garbage bins.
Earlier this year Mr Kilgannon was served with a repossession order over missed mortgage payments on the Wrexham mill, which is open to the public at weekends and still produces wholemeal flour for sale.
The borrower was living in the property, despite this being against the terms of the mortgage, and the new owner was able to get him evicted on the grounds of trespassing, even though the mortgage lender had never gone to court to get a repossession order.
The TV personality reportedly broke down when she received the repossession order from the mortgage lender.
Around 19,123 of these claims led to a repossession order being made although 46% of these were suspended orders - 16% more than during the previous three months, but well down on the 29,586 orders made a year earlier.
A pre-action protocol has been introduced, under which courts can grant a repossession order only if all alternatives to keep people in their home have failed.
1million - was granted a repossession order at Hamilton Sheriff Court.
that a repossession order would be futile (given than the old tenant's lease had already ended), would be disruptive, and would otherwise be inequitable.