reprehensibility


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rep·re·hen·si·ble

 (rĕp′rĭ-hĕn′sə-bəl)
adj.
Deserving rebuke or censure: "Few legal codes were as reprehensible as the Jim Crow laws" (Pete Bodo).

[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin reprehēnsibilis, from Latin reprehēnsus, past participle of reprehendere, to reprehend; see reprehend.]

rep′re·hen′si·bil′i·ty, rep′re·hen′si·ble·ness n.
rep′re·hen′si·bly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reprehensibility - being reprehensible; worthy of and deserving reprehension or reproof
evilness, evil - the quality of being morally wrong in principle or practice; "attempts to explain the origin of evil in the world"
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References in periodicals archive ?
Essentially, because of the United States' veto on the United Nations Security Council (UNSC), Israel acts with moral reprehensibility in repressing generations of Palestinians, imprisoning them, stealing their land, despoiling their historic and religious sites and destroying any legality that interferes with their forces and their administration of an unjust occupation.
44 after finding, among other things, that its conduct had been only of "low to moderate reprehensibility.
When the State kills, it kills with no less reprehensibility as when a criminal kills, for the same violence is involved, and the result is the same: the curtailment of human life and the violation of its inalienable value and worth,' he said.
In determining whether an award was excessive or inadequate, the Alabama court considered whether there was a reasonable relationship between punitive damages and the harm that resulted from the defendant's conduct, the reprehensibility of the defendant's conduct, the duration of that conduct, the defendant's awareness of any concealment of the conduct, the profitability of the defendant from the conduct, and whether the defendant had been punished criminally or had been subject to punitive damages in other cases.
We ultimately see that Nicholson senior is of sufficient moral reprehensibility that he convinces his youngest son Nathan to do exactly the same.
42) Jurors are also influenced by whether the defendant is a corporation or an individual, the reprehensibility of the underlying act, concerns about plaintiff's attorney fees, and beliefs about the parties' insurance coverage.
Gore: (99) (1) the degree of reprehensibility of the defendant's
activity, and felt the need to reinforce the reprehensibility of the
The court examined Gore's three guideposts: (1) the reprehensibility of the defendant's misconduct; (2) the disparity between the actual harm and the punitive damages award; and (3) the difference between the punitive damages award and the penalties authorized in comparable cases.
Campbell (41) in 2003, the Supreme Court has emphasized the primacy of the retribution rationale for punitive damages, holding that the reprehensibility of the defendant's conduct is the first and "[pjerhaps the most important" constitutional guidepost in determining the reasonableness of a punitive damages award.
An example given is the not uncommon use by politicians of the term "dirty Arabush"--a term not unlike "nigger" in its reprehensibility, the only difference being that the use of "nigger" by a US politician would likely destroy a political career or candidacy.