reprehensible


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rep·re·hen·si·ble

 (rĕp′rĭ-hĕn′sə-bəl)
adj.
Deserving rebuke or censure: "Few legal codes were as reprehensible as the Jim Crow laws" (Pete Bodo).

[Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin reprehēnsibilis, from Latin reprehēnsus, past participle of reprehendere, to reprehend; see reprehend.]

rep′re·hen′si·bil′i·ty, rep′re·hen′si·ble·ness n.
rep′re·hen′si·bly adv.

reprehensible

(ˌrɛprɪˈhɛnsəbəl)
adj
open to criticism or rebuke; blameworthy
[C14: from Late Latin reprehensibilis, from Latin reprehendere to hold back, reprove]
ˌrepreˌhensiˈbility, ˌrepreˈhensibleness n
ˌrepreˈhensibly adv

rep•re•hen•si•ble

(ˌrɛp rɪˈhɛn sə bəl)

adj.
deserving rebuke or censure; blameworthy.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Late Latin reprehēnsibilis= Latin reprehēns(us), past participle of reprehendere to reprehend + -ibilis -ible]
rep`re•hen′si•bly, adv.
rep`re•hen`si•bil′i•ty, rep`re•hen′si•ble•ness, n.

reprehensible

- Usually applied to things, not people—the sin and not the sinner.
See also related terms for sin.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.reprehensible - bringing or deserving severe rebuke or censure; "a criminal waste of talent"; "a deplorable act of violence"; "adultery is as reprehensible for a husband as for a wife"
wrong - contrary to conscience or morality or law; "it is wrong for the rich to take advantage of the poor"; "cheating is wrong"; "it is wrong to lie"

reprehensible

reprehensible

adjective
Translations
مَسْؤول عن
hanebnýtrestuhodný
forkastelig
elítélendõ
ámælisverîur
peiktinas
nosodāmspeļams
suçlanabilir

reprehensible

[ˌreprɪˈhensɪbl] ADJreprensible, censurable

reprehensible

[ˌrɛprɪˈhɛnsɪbəl] adjrépréhensible

reprehensible

reprehensible

[ˌrɛprɪˈhɛnsɪbl] adj (frm) → riprovevole

reprehensible

(repriˈhensəbl) adjective
deserving blame. a reprehensible act.
ˌrepreˈhensibly adverb

reprehensible

a. reprensible, reprobable, censurable.
References in classic literature ?
He pulled her hair whenever she came near him, upset his bread and milk to plague her when she had newly cleaned his cage, made Mop bark by pecking at him while Madam dozed, called her names before company, and behaved in all respects like an reprehensible old bird.
But all these foolish arguments of old Sag-Harbor only evinced his foolish pride of reason --a thing still more reprehensible in him, seeing that he had but little learning except what he had picked up from the sun and the sea.
An English friend called my attention to this lapse, and cut out the reprehensible paragraph for me.
This amiable, upright, perfect Jane Fairfax was apparently cherishing very reprehensible feelings.
They gave as another reason for their defeat the extraordinary state of drouth to which they had been reduced by the dusty nature of their occupation and the reprehensible distance from the scene of their labors of any place of public entertainment.
She could only imagine, however, at last that she drew his notice because there was something more wrong and reprehensible, according to his ideas of right, than in any other person present.
He had taken, without hesitation, without reflection even, the principal apartment which the hotelier had pointed out to him with a rapacious aim, very praiseworthy, some will say, very reprehensible will say others, if they admit that Cropole was a physiognomist and judged people at first sight.
It is, if you permit the observation, most reprehensible laxity on your part.
Why should people be angry with a poor girl who had never done a single reprehensible thing in her whole life?
I even went so far as to humor some of his less reprehensible propensities; and there were times when I found myself lauding his wicked jokes, as epicures do mustard, with tears in my eyes: -- so profoundly did it grieve me to hear his evil talk.
I think differently now; time and sickness and sorrow have given me other notions; but at that period I must own I saw nothing reprehensible in what Mr Elliot was doing.
Horne Fisher came down next morning in a late and leisurely fashion, as was his reprehensible habit; he had evidently no appetite for catching worms.