reprobation


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rep·ro·bate

 (rĕp′rə-bāt′)
n.
1. A morally unprincipled person.
2. One who is predestined to damnation.
adj.
1. Morally unprincipled; shameless.
2. Rejected by God and without hope of salvation.
tr.v. rep·ro·bat·ed, rep·ro·bat·ing, rep·ro·bates
1. To disapprove of; condemn.
2. To abandon to eternal damnation. Used of God.

[From Middle English, condemned, from Late Latin reprobātus, past participle of reprobāre, to reprove : Latin re-, opposite; see re- + Latin probāre, to approve; see prove.]

rep′ro·ba′tion n.
rep′ro·ba′tive adj.

reprobation

(ˌrɛprəʊˈbeɪʃən)
n
1. disapproval, blame, or censure
2. (Theology) Christianity condemnation to eternal punishment in hell; rejection by God
reprobative, ˌreproˈbationary adj
ˈreprobatively adv

rep•ro•ba•tion

(ˌrɛp rəˈbeɪ ʃən)

n.
1. disapproval, condemnation, or censure.
2. rejection or exclusion.
3. rejection by God.
[1400–50; late Middle English reprobacion < Late Latin reprobātiō= Latin reprobā(re) to reprove + -tiō -tion]
rep`ro•ba′tion•ar′y, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.reprobation - rejection by God; the state of being condemned to eternal misery in Hell
rejection - the state of being rejected
2.reprobation - severe disapproval
dislike, disfavor, disfavour, disapproval - an inclination to withhold approval from some person or group

reprobation

noun
A comment expressing fault:
Informal: pan.
Slang: knock.
Translations

reprobation

[ˌreprəʊˈbeɪʃən] Nreprobación f

reprobation

nVerdammung f
References in classic literature ?
Grose that she was not at these times a child, but an old, old woman, and that description of her could not have been more strikingly confirmed than in the way in which, for all answer to this, she simply showed me, without a concession, an admission, of her eyes, a countenance of deeper and deeper, of indeed suddenly quite fixed, reprobation.
On the contrary the fair Jewess, though sensible her patient now regarded her as one of a race of reprobation, with whom it was disgraceful to hold any beyond the most necessary intercourse, ceased not to pay the same patient and devoted attention to his safety and convalescence.
If, therefore, the loud clamors against the plan of the convention, on this score, are well founded, no epithets of reprobation will be too strong for the constitution of this State.
Were the federal Constitution, therefore, really chargeable with the accumulation of power, or with a mixture of powers, having a dangerous tendency to such an accumulation, no further arguments would be necessary to inspire a universal reprobation of the system.
The obligation of attendance, the formality, the restraint, the length of time--altogether it is a formidable thing, and what nobody likes; and if the good people who used to kneel and gape in that gallery could have foreseen that the time would ever come when men and women might lie another ten minutes in bed, when they woke with a headache, without danger of reprobation, because chapel was missed, they would have jumped with joy and envy.
I was in a state of tremor, partly at the vague idea that I was the object of reprobation, partly in the agitation of my first hatred-- hatred of this big, spectacled man, who pulled my head about as if he wanted to buy and cheapen it.
But Laure refused to condescend to an act of espial which no curiosity could justify, and she consequently became the object of much reprobation.
Beaufort; it made the righteous reprobation of New York seem like a passing by on the other side.
said old Smallways, regarding his youngest son from the sitting-room window over the green-grocer's shop with something between pride and reprobation.
She used to paste these into books, or send them to her friends, having first drawn a broad bar in blue pencil down the margin, a proceeding which signified equally and indistinguishably the depths of her reprobation or the heights of her approval.
Dorothea's brow took an expression of reprobation and pity.
And we have next to consider the of the philosophic nature, why so many are spoiled and so few escape spoiling--I am speaking of those who were said to be useless but not wicked--and, when we have done with them, we will speak of the imitators of philosophy, what manner of men are they who aspire after a profession which is above them and of which they are unworthy, and then, by their manifold inconsistencies, bring upon philosophy, and upon all philosophers, that universal reprobation of which we speak.