reprove


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re·prove

 (rĭ-pro͞ov′)
tr.v. re·proved, re·prov·ing, re·proves
1. To express disapproval to (someone); criticize: reproved the children for making too much noise. See Synonyms at admonish.
2. To express disapproval about (something): "Some bigger boys laughed. But Augustine angrily reproved their frivolity" (Richard Hughes).

[Middle English reproven, from Anglo-Norman repruver, variant of Old French reprover, from Late Latin reprobāre, to disapprove; see reprobate.]

re·prov′a·ble adj.
re·prov′al n.
re·prov′er n.
re·prov′ing·ly adv.

reprove

(rɪˈpruːv)
vb
(tr) to speak disapprovingly to (a person); rebuke or scold
[C14: from Old French reprover, from Late Latin reprobāre, from Latin re- + probāre to examine, approve1]
reˈprovable adj
reˈprover n
reˈproving adj
reˈprovingly adv

re-prove′


v.

re•prove

(rɪˈpruv)

v. -proved, -prov•ing. v.t.
1. to criticize or correct, esp. gently.
2. to express strong disapproval of; censure.
3. Obs. to disprove or refute.
v.i.
4. to speak in reproof.
[1275–1325; Middle English (v.) < Old French reprover < Latin reprobāre to condemn, reject = re- re- + probāre to approve, examine, prove]
re•prov′er, n.
re•prov′ing•ly, adv.

reprove

- To reject or express disapproval of something.
See also related terms for reject.

reprove


Past participle: reproved
Gerund: reproving

Imperative
reprove
reprove
Present
I reprove
you reprove
he/she/it reproves
we reprove
you reprove
they reprove
Preterite
I reproved
you reproved
he/she/it reproved
we reproved
you reproved
they reproved
Present Continuous
I am reproving
you are reproving
he/she/it is reproving
we are reproving
you are reproving
they are reproving
Present Perfect
I have reproved
you have reproved
he/she/it has reproved
we have reproved
you have reproved
they have reproved
Past Continuous
I was reproving
you were reproving
he/she/it was reproving
we were reproving
you were reproving
they were reproving
Past Perfect
I had reproved
you had reproved
he/she/it had reproved
we had reproved
you had reproved
they had reproved
Future
I will reprove
you will reprove
he/she/it will reprove
we will reprove
you will reprove
they will reprove
Future Perfect
I will have reproved
you will have reproved
he/she/it will have reproved
we will have reproved
you will have reproved
they will have reproved
Future Continuous
I will be reproving
you will be reproving
he/she/it will be reproving
we will be reproving
you will be reproving
they will be reproving
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been reproving
you have been reproving
he/she/it has been reproving
we have been reproving
you have been reproving
they have been reproving
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been reproving
you will have been reproving
he/she/it will have been reproving
we will have been reproving
you will have been reproving
they will have been reproving
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been reproving
you had been reproving
he/she/it had been reproving
we had been reproving
you had been reproving
they had been reproving
Conditional
I would reprove
you would reprove
he/she/it would reprove
we would reprove
you would reprove
they would reprove
Past Conditional
I would have reproved
you would have reproved
he/she/it would have reproved
we would have reproved
you would have reproved
they would have reproved
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.reprove - take to taskreprove - take to task; "He admonished the child for his bad behavior"
criticise, criticize, pick apart, knock - find fault with; express criticism of; point out real or perceived flaws; "The paper criticized the new movie"; "Don't knock the food--it's free"

reprove

verb rebuke, censure, reprimand, scold, check, blame, abuse, condemn, carpet (informal), berate, tick off (informal), chide, admonish, tear into (informal), tell off (informal), take to task, read the riot act, upbraid, bawl out (informal), chew out (U.S. & Canad. informal), tear (someone) off a strip (Brit. informal), give a rocket (Brit. & N.Z. informal), reprehend Women were reproved if they did not wear hats.
encourage, praise, applaud, compliment, commend

reprove

verb
To criticize for a fault or an offense:
Informal: bawl out, lambaste.
Slang: chew out.
Idioms: bring to task, call on the carpet, haul over the coals, let someone have it.
Translations
يُوَبِّخ، يُؤَنِّب
pokárat
irettesætte
ávíta

reprove

[rɪˈpruːv] VT to reprove sb for sthreprobar a algn por algo

reprove

[rɪˈpruːv] vt
[+ action] → réprouver
[+ person] → reprocher à
to reprove sb for sth → reprocher qch à qn
to reprove sb for doing sth → reprocher à qn de faire qch
He was reproved for being late again → On lui a reproché d'être encore en retard.

reprove

vt person, actiontadeln, rügen

reprove

[rɪˈpruːv] vt (person) to reprove (for)rimproverare (di or per), biasimare (per)

reproof

(rəˈpruːf) noun
(an) act of rebuking or reproaching. a glance of stern reproof; He has received several reproofs for bad behaviour.
reprove (rəˈpruːv) verb
to tell (a person) that he has done wrong. The teacher reproved the boys for coming late to school.
reˈproving adjective
a reproving look.
reˈprovingly adverb
References in classic literature ?
And when, at the end of the week, Seth returned, a little weary and with coal soot in his ears and about his eyes, she again found herself unable to reprove him.
Cousin Augustine," said Miss Ophelia, seriously, and laying down her knitting-work, "I suppose I deserve that you should reprove my short-comings.
Yes, sir, and she is afraid you will reprove them and hurt their feelings, if you see them there; so she begs, if - if you don't mind coming in the back way - "
Knightley have been privy to all her attempts of assisting Jane Fairfax, could he even have seen into her heart, he would not, on this occasion, have found any thing to reprove.
Joseph remained to hector over tenants and labourers; and because it was his vocation to be where he had plenty of wickedness to reprove.
For he will certainly obey God rather than man; and will continue to preach to all men of all ages the necessity of virtue and improvement; and if they refuse to listen to him he will still persevere and reprove them.
But he had an approved tolerance for others; sometimes wondering, almost with envy, at the high pressure of spirits involved in their misdeeds; and in any extremity inclined to help rather than to reprove.
It was in Captain S-'s tradition rather to reprove his officers for not carrying on quite enough - in his phrase "for not taking every ounce of advantage of a fair wind.
Stop," said Mazarin; "there I begin to terrify myself with having allowed so many things to pass which the Lord might reprove.
We might as wisely reprove the east wind or the frost, as a political party, whose members, for the most part, could give no account of their position, but stand for the defence of those interests in which they find themselves.
But before I could call out and reprove them, the explanation of the matter occurred to me, and I withdrew behind a tree.
And very oft he comes o' purpose to reprove folk for not coming to church, or not kneeling an' standing when other folk does, or going to the Methody chapel, or summut o' that sort: but I can't say 'at he ever fund much fault wi' me.