republic


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Related to republic: USC

re·pub·lic

 (rĭ-pŭb′lĭk)
n.
1.
a. A political order whose head of state is not a monarch and in modern times is usually a president.
b. A nation that has such a political order.
2.
a. A political order in which the supreme power lies in a body of citizens who are entitled to vote for officers and representatives responsible to them.
b. A nation that has such a political order.
3. often Republic A specific republican government of a nation: the Fourth Republic of France.
4. An autonomous or partially autonomous political and territorial unit belonging to a sovereign federation.
5. A group of people working as equals in the same sphere or field: the republic of letters.

[French république, from Old French, from Latin rēspūblica : rēs, thing; see rē- in Indo-European roots + pūblica, feminine of pūblicus, of the people; see public.]

republic

(rɪˈpʌblɪk)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a form of government in which the people or their elected representatives possess the supreme power
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a political or national unit possessing such a form of government
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a constitutional form in which the head of state is an elected or nominated president
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) any community or group that resembles a political republic in that its members or elements exhibit a general equality, shared interests, etc: the republic of letters.
[C17: from French république, from Latin rēspublica literally: the public thing, from rēs thing + publica public]

re•pub•lic

(rɪˈpʌb lɪk)

n.
1. a state in which the supreme power rests in the body of citizens entitled to vote and is exercised by representatives chosen directly or indirectly by them.
2. a state in which the head of government is not a monarch and is usu. an elected or nominated president.
3. the form of government of such a state.
4. any body of persons viewed as a commonwealth.
[1595–1605; < French république, Middle French < Latin rēs pūblica public affairs, the state, a free state]

republic

A democratic state or form of government in which the head of state is elected rather than holding hereditary office.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.republic - a political system in which the supreme power lies in a body of citizens who can elect people to represent themrepublic - a political system in which the supreme power lies in a body of citizens who can elect people to represent them
Weimar Republic - the German republic founded at Weimar in 1919; "The Weimar Republic was overthrown in 1933 and replaced by the Third Reich"
parliamentary democracy - a democracy having a parliament
form of government, political system - the members of a social organization who are in power
2.republic - a form of government whose head of state is not a monarch; "the head of state in a republic is usually a president"
form of government, political system - the members of a social organization who are in power
Translations
جُمْهورِيَّةجُمْهورِيَّه
republika
republik
tasavalta
गणराज्य
republika
köztársaság
lýðveldilÿîveldi
共和政体
공화국
respublica
respublikarespublikinisrespublikonasrespublikonųrespublikos
republică
republika
republika
republik
สาธารณรัฐ
nền cộng hòa

republic

[rɪˈpʌblɪk] Nrepública f

republic

[rɪˈpʌblɪk] nrépublique f
the Republic of Ireland → la République d'Irlande
The Irish Republic → La République irlandaise

republic

nRepublik f

republic

[rɪˈpʌblɪk] nrepubblica

republic

(rəˈpablik) noun
(a country with) a form of government in which there is no king or queen, the power of government, law-making etc being given to one or more elected representatives (eg a president, members of a parliament etc). The United States is a republic – the United Kingdom is not.
reˈpublican adjective
1. of a republic. a republican form of government.
2. (also noun) (a person) who supports a republican form of government. He is not a monarchist – he is a republican; my republican friends.

republic

جُمْهورِيَّة republika republik Republik δημοκρατία república tasavalta république republika repubblica 共和政体 공화국 republiek republikk republika república республика republik สาธารณรัฐ cumhuriyet nền cộng hòa 共和国
References in classic literature ?
THE Republic of Plato is the longest of his works with the exception of the Laws, and is certainly the greatest of them.
Neither must we forget that the Republic is but the third part of a still larger design which was to have included an ideal history of Athens, as well as a political and physical philosophy.
A republic, by which I mean a government in which the scheme of representation takes place, opens a different prospect, and promises the cure for which we are seeking.
Carthage, though a commercial republic, was the aggressor in the very war that ended in her destruction.
Charles Evremonde, called Darnay, was accused by the public prosecutor as an emigrant, whose life was forfeit to the Republic, under the decree which banished all emigrants on pain of Death.
In the Republic the ideas are spoken of in two ways, which though not contradictory are different.
Most of the mountains are arable, and even the prairies, in this section of the republic, are of deep alluvion.
On the shores of Africa I see a republic,--a republic formed of picked men, who, by energy and self-educating force, have, in many cases, individually, raised themselves above a condition of slavery.
Cornelius de Witt, Ruart de Pulten, that is to say, warden of the dikes, ex-burgomaster of Dort, his native town, and member of the Assembly of the States of Holland, was forty-nine years of age, when the Dutch people, tired of the Republic such as John de Witt, the Grand Pensionary of Holland, understood it, at once conceived a most violent affection for the Stadtholderate, which had been abolished for ever in Holland by the "Perpetual Edict" forced by John de Witt upon the United Provinces.
This Venice, which was a haughty, invincible, magnificent Republic for nearly fourteen hundred years; whose armies compelled the world's applause whenever and wherever they battled; whose navies well nigh held dominion of the seas, and whose merchant fleets whitened the remotest oceans with their sails and loaded these piers with the products of every clime, is fallen a prey to poverty, neglect and melancholy decay.
All states, all powers, that have held and hold rule over men have been and are either republics or principalities.
The sword in his hand remains as sharp as ever upon both its edges; and he may well go on playing his royal game of quoits with hurricanes, tossing them over from the continent of republics to the continent of kingdoms, in the assurance that both the new republics and the old kingdoms, the heat of fire and the strength of iron, with the untold generations of audacious men, shall crumble to dust at the steps of his throne, and pass away, and be forgotten before his own rule comes to an end.