repudiate


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re·pu·di·ate

 (rĭ-pyo͞o′dē-āt′)
tr.v. re·pu·di·at·ed, re·pu·di·at·ing, re·pu·di·ates
1. To reject the validity or authority of: "Chaucer ... not only came to doubt the worth of his extraordinary body of work, but repudiated it" (Joyce Carol Oates).
2. To reject emphatically as unfounded, untrue, or unjust: repudiated the accusation.
3. To refuse to recognize or pay: repudiate a debt.
4.
a. To disown (a child, for example).
b. To refuse to have any dealings with.

[Latin repudiāre, repudiāt-, from repudium, divorce.]

re·pu′di·a′tive adj.
re·pu′di·a′tor n.

repudiate

(rɪˈpjuːdɪˌeɪt)
vb (tr)
1. to reject the authority or validity of; refuse to accept or ratify: Congress repudiated the treaty that the President had negotiated.
2. (Banking & Finance) to refuse to acknowledge or pay (a debt)
3. to cast off or disown (a son, lover, etc)
[C16: from Latin repudiāre to put away, from repudium a separation, divorce, from re- + pudēre to be ashamed]
reˈpudiable adj
reˌpudiˈation n
reˈpudiative adj
reˈpudiˌator n

re•pu•di•ate

(rɪˈpyu diˌeɪt)

v.t. -at•ed, -at•ing.
1. to reject as having no authority or binding force.
2. to disown: to repudiate a son.
3. to reject with disapproval or condemnation.
4. to reject with denial: to repudiate an accusation.
5. to refuse to acknowledge and pay (a debt).
[1535–45; < Latin repudiātus, past participle of repudiāre to reject, refuse, v. derivative of repudium rejection of a prospective spouse, divorce]
re•pu′di•a•ble, adj.
re•pu′di•a`tive, adj.
re•pu′di•a`tor, n.

repudiate


Past participle: repudiated
Gerund: repudiating

Imperative
repudiate
repudiate
Present
I repudiate
you repudiate
he/she/it repudiates
we repudiate
you repudiate
they repudiate
Preterite
I repudiated
you repudiated
he/she/it repudiated
we repudiated
you repudiated
they repudiated
Present Continuous
I am repudiating
you are repudiating
he/she/it is repudiating
we are repudiating
you are repudiating
they are repudiating
Present Perfect
I have repudiated
you have repudiated
he/she/it has repudiated
we have repudiated
you have repudiated
they have repudiated
Past Continuous
I was repudiating
you were repudiating
he/she/it was repudiating
we were repudiating
you were repudiating
they were repudiating
Past Perfect
I had repudiated
you had repudiated
he/she/it had repudiated
we had repudiated
you had repudiated
they had repudiated
Future
I will repudiate
you will repudiate
he/she/it will repudiate
we will repudiate
you will repudiate
they will repudiate
Future Perfect
I will have repudiated
you will have repudiated
he/she/it will have repudiated
we will have repudiated
you will have repudiated
they will have repudiated
Future Continuous
I will be repudiating
you will be repudiating
he/she/it will be repudiating
we will be repudiating
you will be repudiating
they will be repudiating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been repudiating
you have been repudiating
he/she/it has been repudiating
we have been repudiating
you have been repudiating
they have been repudiating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been repudiating
you will have been repudiating
he/she/it will have been repudiating
we will have been repudiating
you will have been repudiating
they will have been repudiating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been repudiating
you had been repudiating
he/she/it had been repudiating
we had been repudiating
you had been repudiating
they had been repudiating
Conditional
I would repudiate
you would repudiate
he/she/it would repudiate
we would repudiate
you would repudiate
they would repudiate
Past Conditional
I would have repudiated
you would have repudiated
he/she/it would have repudiated
we would have repudiated
you would have repudiated
they would have repudiated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.repudiate - cast off; "She renounced her husband"; "The parents repudiated their son"
reject - refuse to accept or acknowledge; "I reject the idea of starting a war"; "The journal rejected the student's paper"
apostatise, apostatize, tergiversate - abandon one's beliefs or allegiances
abjure, forswear, recant, retract, resile - formally reject or disavow a formerly held belief, usually under pressure; "He retracted his earlier statements about his religion"; "She abjured her beliefs"
unsay, withdraw, swallow, take back - take back what one has said; "He swallowed his words"
rebut, refute - overthrow by argument, evidence, or proof; "The speaker refuted his opponent's arguments"
deny - refuse to accept or believe; "He denied his fatal illness"
2.repudiate - refuse to acknowledge, ratify, or recognize as valid; "The woman repudiated the divorce settlement"
reject - refuse to accept or acknowledge; "I reject the idea of starting a war"; "The journal rejected the student's paper"
3.repudiate - refuse to recognize or pay; "repudiate a debt"
refuse, decline - show unwillingness towards; "he declined to join the group on a hike"
4.repudiate - reject as untrue, unfounded, or unjust; "She repudiated the accusations"
deny - declare untrue; contradict; "He denied the allegations"; "She denied that she had taken money"

repudiate

verb
1. reject, renounce, retract, disown, abandon, desert, reverse, cut off, discard, revoke, forsake, cast off, rescind, disavow, turn your back on, abjure, wash your hands of He repudiated any form of nationalism.
reject own, accept, admit, defend, acknowledge, assert, proclaim, ratify, avow
2. deny, oppose, disagree with, rebuff, refute, disprove, rebut, disclaim, gainsay (archaic or literary) He repudiated the charges.
4. divorce, end your marriage to A woman can repudiate her insane husband.

repudiate

verb
To refuse to recognize or acknowledge:
Translations

repudiate

[rɪˈpjuːdɪeɪt] VT
1. (= deny) [+ charge] → rechazar, negar
2. (= refuse to recognize) [+ debt, treaty] → negarse a reconocer, desconocer; [+ attitude, values, wife, violence] → repudiar

repudiate

[rɪˈpjuːdieɪt] vt
[+ idea, view, report] → désavouer; [+ violence] → désavouer; [+ accusation, charge, allegation] → rejeter
(old-fashioned) [+ wife] → répudier

repudiate

vt personverstoßen; authorship, debt, obligationnicht anerkennen; accusation, remarks, chargezurückweisen

repudiate

[rɪˈpjuːdɪˌeɪt] (frm) vt (charge, offer of friendship) → respingere; (debt, treaty) → disconoscere, rifiutarsi di onorare; (one's wife) → ripudiare

repudiate

v. repudiar, repeler.
References in classic literature ?
He could not disavow his actions, belauded as they were by half the world, and so he had to repudiate truth, goodness, and all humanity.
It was to teach them, that the holiest amongst us has but attained so far above his fellows as to discern more clearly the Mercy which looks down, and repudiate more utterly the phantom of human merit, which would look aspiringly upward.
Carlyle has learned to repudiate, and he would have others repudiate, 'The Everlasting No,' the materialistic attitude of unfaith in God and the spiritual world, and he proclaims 'The Everlasting Yea,' wherein are affirmed, the significance of life as a means of developing character and the necessity of accepting life and its requirements with manly self-reliance and moral energy.
Has she said to you since yesterday--except to repudiate her familiarity with anything so dreadful--a single other word about Miss Jessel?
The only way to save myself was to repudiate it, and let Wingrave get out of the affair as well as he could.
Kennedy did repudiate the most objectionable features of his church's policies on church and state, but his church's bishops continued to go their own way.
An Arab-American group wants Barack Obama and Rahm Emanuel to repudiate remarks made by Emanuel=92s father.
Barack Obama's economic adviser, who suggested to Canadian officials that a President Obama probably wouldn't be foolish enough to repudiate the North American Free Trade Agreement.
McCain said: "We've had a dignified campaign, and I repudiate any comments that are made, including Pastor Hagee's, if they are anti-Catholic or offensive to Catholics" (Catholic News Agency, 8 March 2008).
They give plenty of leeway: In fact, the definition is eerily reminiscent of a 2002 Justice Department memo that the Bush Administration had to repudiate.
Fortunately, the people still have a say at the ballot box and can repudiate the cynical and deceitful games played by the council.
If the Democrats repudiate their principles in 2008, I'm open to a sane third-party candidate--or even a progressive Republican, if such creatures aren't extinct by then.