repudiate


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re·pu·di·ate

 (rĭ-pyo͞o′dē-āt′)
tr.v. re·pu·di·at·ed, re·pu·di·at·ing, re·pu·di·ates
1. To reject the validity or authority of: "Chaucer ... not only came to doubt the worth of his extraordinary body of work, but repudiated it" (Joyce Carol Oates).
2. To reject emphatically as unfounded, untrue, or unjust: repudiated the accusation.
3. To refuse to recognize or pay: repudiate a debt.
4.
a. To disown (a child, for example).
b. To refuse to have any dealings with.

[Latin repudiāre, repudiāt-, from repudium, divorce.]

re·pu′di·a′tive adj.
re·pu′di·a′tor n.

repudiate

(rɪˈpjuːdɪˌeɪt)
vb (tr)
1. to reject the authority or validity of; refuse to accept or ratify: Congress repudiated the treaty that the President had negotiated.
2. (Banking & Finance) to refuse to acknowledge or pay (a debt)
3. to cast off or disown (a son, lover, etc)
[C16: from Latin repudiāre to put away, from repudium a separation, divorce, from re- + pudēre to be ashamed]
reˈpudiable adj
reˌpudiˈation n
reˈpudiative adj
reˈpudiˌator n

re•pu•di•ate

(rɪˈpyu diˌeɪt)

v.t. -at•ed, -at•ing.
1. to reject as having no authority or binding force.
2. to disown: to repudiate a son.
3. to reject with disapproval or condemnation.
4. to reject with denial: to repudiate an accusation.
5. to refuse to acknowledge and pay (a debt).
[1535–45; < Latin repudiātus, past participle of repudiāre to reject, refuse, v. derivative of repudium rejection of a prospective spouse, divorce]
re•pu′di•a•ble, adj.
re•pu′di•a`tive, adj.
re•pu′di•a`tor, n.

repudiate


Past participle: repudiated
Gerund: repudiating

Imperative
repudiate
repudiate
Present
I repudiate
you repudiate
he/she/it repudiates
we repudiate
you repudiate
they repudiate
Preterite
I repudiated
you repudiated
he/she/it repudiated
we repudiated
you repudiated
they repudiated
Present Continuous
I am repudiating
you are repudiating
he/she/it is repudiating
we are repudiating
you are repudiating
they are repudiating
Present Perfect
I have repudiated
you have repudiated
he/she/it has repudiated
we have repudiated
you have repudiated
they have repudiated
Past Continuous
I was repudiating
you were repudiating
he/she/it was repudiating
we were repudiating
you were repudiating
they were repudiating
Past Perfect
I had repudiated
you had repudiated
he/she/it had repudiated
we had repudiated
you had repudiated
they had repudiated
Future
I will repudiate
you will repudiate
he/she/it will repudiate
we will repudiate
you will repudiate
they will repudiate
Future Perfect
I will have repudiated
you will have repudiated
he/she/it will have repudiated
we will have repudiated
you will have repudiated
they will have repudiated
Future Continuous
I will be repudiating
you will be repudiating
he/she/it will be repudiating
we will be repudiating
you will be repudiating
they will be repudiating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been repudiating
you have been repudiating
he/she/it has been repudiating
we have been repudiating
you have been repudiating
they have been repudiating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been repudiating
you will have been repudiating
he/she/it will have been repudiating
we will have been repudiating
you will have been repudiating
they will have been repudiating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been repudiating
you had been repudiating
he/she/it had been repudiating
we had been repudiating
you had been repudiating
they had been repudiating
Conditional
I would repudiate
you would repudiate
he/she/it would repudiate
we would repudiate
you would repudiate
they would repudiate
Past Conditional
I would have repudiated
you would have repudiated
he/she/it would have repudiated
we would have repudiated
you would have repudiated
they would have repudiated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.repudiate - cast off; "She renounced her husband"; "The parents repudiated their son"
reject - refuse to accept or acknowledge; "I reject the idea of starting a war"; "The journal rejected the student's paper"
apostatise, apostatize, tergiversate - abandon one's beliefs or allegiances
abjure, forswear, recant, retract, resile - formally reject or disavow a formerly held belief, usually under pressure; "He retracted his earlier statements about his religion"; "She abjured her beliefs"
unsay, withdraw, swallow, take back - take back what one has said; "He swallowed his words"
rebut, refute - overthrow by argument, evidence, or proof; "The speaker refuted his opponent's arguments"
deny - refuse to accept or believe; "He denied his fatal illness"
2.repudiate - refuse to acknowledge, ratify, or recognize as valid; "The woman repudiated the divorce settlement"
reject - refuse to accept or acknowledge; "I reject the idea of starting a war"; "The journal rejected the student's paper"
3.repudiate - refuse to recognize or pay; "repudiate a debt"
refuse, decline - show unwillingness towards; "he declined to join the group on a hike"
4.repudiate - reject as untrue, unfounded, or unjust; "She repudiated the accusations"
deny - declare untrue; contradict; "He denied the allegations"; "She denied that she had taken money"

repudiate

verb
1. reject, renounce, retract, disown, abandon, desert, reverse, cut off, discard, revoke, forsake, cast off, rescind, disavow, turn your back on, abjure, wash your hands of He repudiated any form of nationalism.
reject own, accept, admit, defend, acknowledge, assert, proclaim, ratify, avow
2. deny, oppose, disagree with, rebuff, refute, disprove, rebut, disclaim, gainsay (archaic or literary) He repudiated the charges.
4. divorce, end your marriage to A woman can repudiate her insane husband.

repudiate

verb
To refuse to recognize or acknowledge:
Translations

repudiate

[rɪˈpjuːdɪeɪt] VT
1. (= deny) [+ charge] → rechazar, negar
2. (= refuse to recognize) [+ debt, treaty] → negarse a reconocer, desconocer; [+ attitude, values, wife, violence] → repudiar

repudiate

[rɪˈpjuːdieɪt] vt
[+ idea, view, report] → désavouer; [+ violence] → désavouer; [+ accusation, charge, allegation] → rejeter
(old-fashioned) [+ wife] → répudier

repudiate

vt personverstoßen; authorship, debt, obligationnicht anerkennen; accusation, remarks, chargezurückweisen

repudiate

[rɪˈpjuːdɪˌeɪt] (frm) vt (charge, offer of friendship) → respingere; (debt, treaty) → disconoscere, rifiutarsi di onorare; (one's wife) → ripudiare

repudiate

v. repudiar, repeler.
References in classic literature ?
It was marvellous to observe how the ghosts of bygone meals were continually rising up before him -- not in anger or retribution, but as if grateful for his former appreciation, and seeking to repudiate an endless series of enjoyment.
Has she said to you since yesterday--except to repudiate her familiarity with anything so dreadful--a single other word about Miss Jessel?
This left me no course but to regret that I had been "betrayed into a warmth which," and on the whole to repudiate, as untenable, the idea that I was to be found anywhere.
For I am and always have been one of those natures who must be guided by reason, whatever the reason may be which upon reflection appears to me to be the best; and now that this chance has befallen me, I cannot repudiate my own words: the principles which I have hitherto honoured and revered I still honour, and unless we can at once find other and better principles, I am certain not to agree with you; no, not even if the power of the multitude could inflict many more imprisonments, confiscations, deaths, frightening us like children with hobgoblin terrors (compare Apol.
de Bellegarde's face flushed a little, but he held his head higher, as if to repudiate this concession to vulgar perturbability.
If it had been dictated to her she had of course to know what it was about; yet after all the effect of it was to repudiate the idea of any connection with the poet.
And then, as Archer made no effort to glance at the paper or to repudiate the suggestion, the lawyer somewhat flatly continued: "I don't say it's conclusive, you observe; far from it.
to remark that you was so good on that occasion as to repel and repudiate that declaration.
He could not disavow his actions, belauded as they were by half the world, and so he had to repudiate truth, goodness, and all humanity.
As to Christian or unchristian, I repudiate your canting palavering Christianity; and as to the way in which I spend my income, it is not my principle to maintain thieves and cheat offspring of their due inheritance in order to support religion and set myself up as a saintly Killjoy.
The Gatholian knew that scarce the most abandoned of knaves would repudiate this solemn pledge, and so he stooped, and picking up the old man's sword returned it to him, hilt first, in acceptance of his friendship.
Supposing I say that, believing you now to have a guilty knowledge of this murder, I repudiate our bargain?