repudiate

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Related to repudiating: anticipatory

re·pu·di·ate

 (rĭ-pyo͞o′dē-āt′)
tr.v. re·pu·di·at·ed, re·pu·di·at·ing, re·pu·di·ates
1. To reject the validity or authority of: "Chaucer ... not only came to doubt the worth of his extraordinary body of work, but repudiated it" (Joyce Carol Oates).
2. To reject emphatically as unfounded, untrue, or unjust: repudiated the accusation.
3. To refuse to recognize or pay: repudiate a debt.
4.
a. To disown (a child, for example).
b. To refuse to have any dealings with.

[Latin repudiāre, repudiāt-, from repudium, divorce.]

re·pu′di·a′tive adj.
re·pu′di·a′tor n.

repudiate

(rɪˈpjuːdɪˌeɪt)
vb (tr)
1. to reject the authority or validity of; refuse to accept or ratify: Congress repudiated the treaty that the President had negotiated.
2. (Banking & Finance) to refuse to acknowledge or pay (a debt)
3. to cast off or disown (a son, lover, etc)
[C16: from Latin repudiāre to put away, from repudium a separation, divorce, from re- + pudēre to be ashamed]
reˈpudiable adj
reˌpudiˈation n
reˈpudiative adj
reˈpudiˌator n

re•pu•di•ate

(rɪˈpyu diˌeɪt)

v.t. -at•ed, -at•ing.
1. to reject as having no authority or binding force.
2. to disown: to repudiate a son.
3. to reject with disapproval or condemnation.
4. to reject with denial: to repudiate an accusation.
5. to refuse to acknowledge and pay (a debt).
[1535–45; < Latin repudiātus, past participle of repudiāre to reject, refuse, v. derivative of repudium rejection of a prospective spouse, divorce]
re•pu′di•a•ble, adj.
re•pu′di•a`tive, adj.
re•pu′di•a`tor, n.

repudiate


Past participle: repudiated
Gerund: repudiating

Imperative
repudiate
repudiate
Present
I repudiate
you repudiate
he/she/it repudiates
we repudiate
you repudiate
they repudiate
Preterite
I repudiated
you repudiated
he/she/it repudiated
we repudiated
you repudiated
they repudiated
Present Continuous
I am repudiating
you are repudiating
he/she/it is repudiating
we are repudiating
you are repudiating
they are repudiating
Present Perfect
I have repudiated
you have repudiated
he/she/it has repudiated
we have repudiated
you have repudiated
they have repudiated
Past Continuous
I was repudiating
you were repudiating
he/she/it was repudiating
we were repudiating
you were repudiating
they were repudiating
Past Perfect
I had repudiated
you had repudiated
he/she/it had repudiated
we had repudiated
you had repudiated
they had repudiated
Future
I will repudiate
you will repudiate
he/she/it will repudiate
we will repudiate
you will repudiate
they will repudiate
Future Perfect
I will have repudiated
you will have repudiated
he/she/it will have repudiated
we will have repudiated
you will have repudiated
they will have repudiated
Future Continuous
I will be repudiating
you will be repudiating
he/she/it will be repudiating
we will be repudiating
you will be repudiating
they will be repudiating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been repudiating
you have been repudiating
he/she/it has been repudiating
we have been repudiating
you have been repudiating
they have been repudiating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been repudiating
you will have been repudiating
he/she/it will have been repudiating
we will have been repudiating
you will have been repudiating
they will have been repudiating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been repudiating
you had been repudiating
he/she/it had been repudiating
we had been repudiating
you had been repudiating
they had been repudiating
Conditional
I would repudiate
you would repudiate
he/she/it would repudiate
we would repudiate
you would repudiate
they would repudiate
Past Conditional
I would have repudiated
you would have repudiated
he/she/it would have repudiated
we would have repudiated
you would have repudiated
they would have repudiated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.repudiate - cast off; "She renounced her husband"; "The parents repudiated their son"
reject - refuse to accept or acknowledge; "I reject the idea of starting a war"; "The journal rejected the student's paper"
apostatise, apostatize, tergiversate - abandon one's beliefs or allegiances
abjure, forswear, recant, retract, resile - formally reject or disavow a formerly held belief, usually under pressure; "He retracted his earlier statements about his religion"; "She abjured her beliefs"
unsay, withdraw, swallow, take back - take back what one has said; "He swallowed his words"
rebut, refute - overthrow by argument, evidence, or proof; "The speaker refuted his opponent's arguments"
deny - refuse to accept or believe; "He denied his fatal illness"
2.repudiate - refuse to acknowledge, ratify, or recognize as valid; "The woman repudiated the divorce settlement"
reject - refuse to accept or acknowledge; "I reject the idea of starting a war"; "The journal rejected the student's paper"
3.repudiate - refuse to recognize or pay; "repudiate a debt"
refuse, decline - show unwillingness towards; "he declined to join the group on a hike"
4.repudiate - reject as untrue, unfounded, or unjust; "She repudiated the accusations"
deny - declare untrue; contradict; "He denied the allegations"; "She denied that she had taken money"

repudiate

verb
1. reject, renounce, retract, disown, abandon, desert, reverse, cut off, discard, revoke, forsake, cast off, rescind, disavow, turn your back on, abjure, wash your hands of He repudiated any form of nationalism.
reject own, accept, admit, defend, acknowledge, assert, proclaim, ratify, avow
2. deny, oppose, disagree with, rebuff, refute, disprove, rebut, disclaim, gainsay (archaic or literary) He repudiated the charges.
4. divorce, end your marriage to A woman can repudiate her insane husband.

repudiate

verb
To refuse to recognize or acknowledge:
Translations

repudiate

[rɪˈpjuːdɪeɪt] VT
1. (= deny) [+ charge] → rechazar, negar
2. (= refuse to recognize) [+ debt, treaty] → negarse a reconocer, desconocer; [+ attitude, values, wife, violence] → repudiar

repudiate

[rɪˈpjuːdieɪt] vt
[+ idea, view, report] → désavouer; [+ violence] → désavouer; [+ accusation, charge, allegation] → rejeter
(old-fashioned) [+ wife] → répudier

repudiate

vt personverstoßen; authorship, debt, obligationnicht anerkennen; accusation, remarks, chargezurückweisen

repudiate

[rɪˈpjuːdɪˌeɪt] (frm) vt (charge, offer of friendship) → respingere; (debt, treaty) → disconoscere, rifiutarsi di onorare; (one's wife) → ripudiare

repudiate

v. repudiar, repeler.
References in classic literature ?
Micawber sat in his elbow-chair, with his eyebrows raised; half receiving and half repudiating Mrs.
But Agatha had drawn the new inference from the old facts, and would not be talked out of repudiating it.
I hardly like even to mention the little meannesses of which they will be rid, for they are beneath notice: such, for example, as the flattery of the rich by the poor, and all the pains and pangs which men experience in bringing up a family, and in finding money to buy necessaries for their household, borrowing and then repudiating, getting how they can, and giving the money into the hands of women and slaves to keep--the many evils of so many kinds which people suffer in this way are mean enough and obvious enough, and not worth speaking of.
Too much shaken in mind and body to compose a letter in the French language in reply to that of her correspondent, she dictated to Briggs a furious answer in her own native tongue, repudiating Mrs.
One or another on 'em,' said the turnkey, repudiating beforehand the refusal of all his suggestions.
The old man shook his head, gently repudiating the imputation, and suppresed a sigh, and moved to the table at which Mr Fledgeby was now pouring out for himself a cup of steaming and fragrant coffee from a pot that had stood ready on the hob.
But Salehi tried to soothe things over by repudiating the militant remarks outright.
Los Angeles Mayor James Hahn found himself in an embarrassing position Tuesday - repudiating a petition he signed that opposed the war against Iraq as ``unjust.
If it were used to make a transaction, repudiating it would be difficult without first establishing a reasonable case for whom else had access to one's e-mail.