repugnance


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re·pug·nance

 (rĭ-pŭg′nəns)
n.
1. Extreme dislike or aversion.
2. Logic The relationship of contradictory terms; inconsistency.

re•pug•nance

(rɪˈpʌg nəns)

also re•pug′nan•cy,



n.
1. the state of being repugnant.
2. strong distaste or aversion.
3. contradictoriness or inconsistency.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.repugnance - intense aversion
disgust - strong feelings of dislike
2.repugnance - the relation between propositions that cannot both be true at the same time
contradictoriness - the relation that exists when opposites cannot coexist

repugnance

repugnance

noun
Translations

repugnance

[rɪˈpʌgnəns] Nrepugnancia f

repugnance

[riˈpʌgnəns] n (= disgust) → dégoût m

repugnance

nWiderwille m, → Abneigung f(towards, for gegen)

repugnance

[rɪˈpʌgnəns] nripugnanza
References in classic literature ?
It certainly operated to prolong in their case, and to confirm to them as their only inheritance, those feelings of repugnance and superstitious terror with which the people of the town, even after awakening from their frenzy, continued to regard the memory of the reputed witches.
She stood apart from moral interests, yet close beside them, like a ghost that revisits the familiar fireside, and can no longer make itself seen or felt; no more smile with the household joy, nor mourn with the kindred sorrow; or, should it succeed in manifesting its forbidden sympathy, awakening only terror and horrible repugnance.
Be it said, that though I had felt such a strong repugnance to his smoking in the bed the night before, yet see how elastic our stiff prejudices grow when love once comes to bend them.
His talents were of the very first order, although his mind showed a preference always for the ideal and the aesthetic, and there was about him that repugnance to the actual business of life which is the common result of this balance of the faculties.
He must be gone within a few hours, though without feeling any real alarm for his aunt, to lessen his repugnance.
He stood at Miss Temple's side; he was speaking low in her ear: I did not doubt he was making disclosures of my villainy; and I watched her eye with painful anxiety, expecting every moment to see its dark orb turn on me a glance of repugnance and contempt.
The abhorrence in which I held the man, the dread I had of him, the repugnance with which I shrank from him, could not have been exceeded if he had been some terrible beast.
Their sense of his usefulness would have counteracted any repugnance or suspicion which was not confirmed by a deficiency in the quality or the tale of the cloth he wove for them.
Ivanhoe expressed great repugnance to this plan, which he grounded on unwillingness to give farther trouble to his benefactors.
Overcoming a strong repugnance, I tore open his shirt at the neck, and there, sure enough, hanging to a bit of tarry string, which I cut with his own gully, we found the key.
I wished her to have this form rather than a stranger one, so that we could see her in the family without repugnance.
Some of them, either less impressed with the importance of national credit, or because their citizens have little, if any, immediate interest in the question, feel an indifference, if not a repugnance, to the payment of the domestic debt at any rate.