repugnant


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re·pug·nant

 (rĭ-pŭg′nənt)
adj.
1. Arousing disgust or aversion; offensive or repulsive: morally repugnant behavior.
2. Logic Contradictory; inconsistent.

[Middle English, antagonistic, from Old French, from Latin repugnāns, repugnant-, present participle of repugnāre, to fight against; see repugn.]

re·pug′nant·ly adv.

repugnant

(rɪˈpʌɡnənt)
adj
1. repellent to the senses; causing aversion
2. distasteful; offensive; disgusting
3. contradictory; inconsistent or incompatible
[C14: from Latin repugnāns resisting; see repugn]
reˈpugnance, reˈpugnancy n
reˈpugnantly adv

re•pug•nant

(rɪˈpʌg nənt)

adj.
1. objectionable or offensive; repellent.
2. not consistent or compatible.
3. opposed or antagonistic.
[1350–1400; Middle English repugnaunt < Middle French < Latin repugnant-, s. of repugnāns, present participle of repugnāre= re- + pugnāre to fight]
re•pug′nant•ly, adv.
repugn, repugnant - Repugn means "to strive against" or "be contradictory or inconsistent," giving us repugnant.
See also related terms for strive.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.repugnant - offensive to the mind; "an abhorrent deed"; "the obscene massacre at Wounded Knee"; "morally repugnant customs"; "repulsive behavior"; "the most repulsive character in recent novels"
offensive - unpleasant or disgusting especially to the senses; "offensive odors"

repugnant

adjective
2. incompatible, opposed, hostile, adverse, contradictory, inconsistent, averse, antagonistic, inimical, antipathetic It is repugnant to the values of our society.
incompatible compatible

repugnant

adjective
Translations

repugnant

[rɪˈpʌgnənt] ADJrepugnante
it is repugnant to meme repugna

repugnant

[rɪˈpʌgnənt] adjrépugnant(e)
to be repugnant to sb → répugner à qn

repugnant

adjwiderlich, abstoßend; (stronger) → ekelerregend; to be repugnant to somebodyjdm widerlich sein

repugnant

[rɪˈpʌgnənt] adjripugnante
to be repugnant to sb → ripugnare a qn

repugnant

a. repugnante, repulsivo-a.
References in classic literature ?
Some persons endeavour to prove that Onomacritus, the Locrian, was the first person of note who drew up laws; and that he employed himself in that business while he was at Crete, where he continued some time to learn the prophetic art: and they say, that Thales was his companion; and that Lycurgus and Zaleucus were the scholars of Thales, and Charondas of Zaleucus; but those who advance this, advance what is repugnant to chronology.
I have asserted, that true honour and true virtue are almost synonymous terms, and they are both founded on the unalterable rule of right, and the eternal fitness of things; to which an untruth being absolutely repugnant and contrary, it is certain that true honour cannot support an untruth.
And woe unto me if I could not laugh at your marvelling, and had to swallow all that is repugnant in your platters!
This fortune was a great boon to him; for, though he might have made millions of dollars by exploiting two or three of his chemical discoveries relative to new processes of dyeing, it was always repugnant to him to use for his own private gain the wonderful gift of invention he had received from nature.
The princess felt for a moment a despair that cannot be described; it was repugnant to her, notwithstanding the exquisite delicacy which Raoul had exhibited, to feel herself at the mercy of one who had discovered such an indiscretion.
Alcohol had been a dreadfully repugnant thing--more nauseous than any physic.
Graham, I did not like them a bit the better for it - or Eliza Millward either - and the thought of meeting them was the more repugnant to me that I could not, now, defy their seeming calumnies and triumph in my own convictions as before.
Your cold and sullen temper, which chills every breast about you, which turns affection into fear, and changes duty into dread, has forced us on this secret course, repugnant to our nature and our wish, and far more foreign, sir, to us than you.
But I had become aware, even so early as during my college life, that no opinion, however absurd and incredible, can be imagined, which has not been maintained by some on of the philosophers; and afterwards in the course of my travels I remarked that all those whose opinions are decidedly repugnant to ours are not in that account barbarians and savages, but on the contrary that many of these nations make an equally good, if not better, use of their reason than we do.
They seem still to aim at things repugnant and irreconcilable; at an augmentation of federal authority, without a diminution of State authority; at sovereignty in the Union, and complete independence in the members.
The respect created by the conviction of his valuable qualities, though at first unwillingly admitted, had for some time ceased to be repugnant to her feeling; and it was now heightened into somewhat of a friendlier nature, by the testimony so highly in his favour, and bringing forward his disposition in so amiable a light, which yesterday had produced.
Stuart; but the idea of abandoning a fellow being, and a comrade, in such a forlorn situation, was too repugnant to his feelings to be admitted for an instant.