requote

requote

(riːˈkwəʊt)
vb (tr)
1. to quote again
2. (Banking & Finance) to quote a new price for, to offer a new quote for
References in periodicals archive ?
Contract awarded for Requote Setting up & Operating of a School-based Student Care Centre in Yew Tee Primary School, commencing on 1 January 2017 to 31 December 2018 with the option to extend up to 4 years.
To requote what is worst, Nietzsche writes that "the youthful stock-exchange Jew is the most repulsive invention of the entire human race.
I requote the pertinent part here: "I hereby declare, on oath, that I absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereign, of whom or which I have heretofore been a subject or citizen; that I will support and defend the Constitution and laws of the United States of America against all enemies, foreign and domestic.
Sure, we could skirt around the issue and quote and requote the weasel words of union leaders and politicians alike.
Notify the company that you are not married and it will requote your pension on a single-life basis
Tell the firm and they will requote on a single-life basis.
A good time to requote Justice Putnam's "Prudent Man Rule" which included the conclusion: "do what you will, your capital is at risk".
If his customer doesn't respond in 30 days, he may have to requote, so the whole process may take some time before he actually gets a sale.
During a regularly-scheduled requote of shop supplies, a local distributor quoted American Torch Tip, Inc.
Here, that which is unforeseeable pertains to "future misfortunes" (to requote Aquinas' term), which are independent of the mind, and can be neither anticipated nor deflected by it.
To requote, Jim "smiled as he picked a dead leaf and bits of trash out of the back of her head" (53).
Deconstruction of cultural referents such as art can take place without discouraging further artistic endeavour because of an unnecessary or over-zealous `exposure of error', to requote Spivak.