reradiate

re·ra·di·ate

 (rē-rā′dē-āt′)
tr.v. re·ra·di·at·ed, re·ra·di·at·ing, re·ra·di·ates
To radiate (absorbed radiation) after absorbing incident energy.

re·ra′di·a′tion (-ā′shən) n.

reradiate

(riːˈreɪdɪˌeɪt)
vb (tr)
to radiate back out or again (energy which has previously been absorbed)
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References in periodicals archive ?
That means that the gas and the haze behave very differently in the way they absorb and reradiate energy from the sun.
Carbon dioxide, like other greenhouse gases, can absorb and reradiate infrared light back to Earth.
It also depends on the road surface; the dark surface of the road will reradiate the heat from the sun back towards your car.
They also absorb some of Earth's outgoing radiation and then reradiate some of this absorbed energy--which would otherwise be sent into outer space--back to the Earth's surface.
2] provide it with a special ability to absorb and reradiate the sun's longer wavelength radiation, causing warming of the troposphere and an increase in high-altitude (cirrus) cloud, further amplifying the heating process.
surface reflectivity), which absorb and then reradiate heat; building configurations that trap heat; and the concentrated generation of heat from generators, vehicles, and other sources (Oke 1982).
The "greenhouse effect" is the well-known process that keeps the Earth's temperature above the -18[degrees]C temperature it would have if greenhouse gases in the atmosphere did not absorb the sun's heat and reradiate it back to the surface.
Those constituents reradiate upwards and downwards, thereby heating the Earth's surface.
We're relying on objects in the room to absorb the heat and then reradiate that heat outward just like what the sun does with the earth," Caldwell said.
For example, noisy support computers couple noise into the enclosure via the cables and reradiate at levels that are over the limit in an ambient test setup.
The top is black to absorb the sun's heat and the bottom is black to reradiate that heat onto the food.