rescue


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to rescue: Rescue remedy

res·cue

 (rĕs′kyo͞o)
tr.v. res·cued, res·cu·ing, res·cues
1. To cause to be free from danger, imprisonment, or difficulty; save. See Synonyms at save1.
2. Law To remove (a person or property) from legal custody by force, in violation of the law.
n.
1. An act of rescuing; a deliverance.
2. Law The criminal offense of removing a person or property.

[Middle English rescouen, from Old French rescourre : re-, re- + escourre, to shake (from Latin excutere : ex-, ex- + quatere, to shake; see kwēt- in Indo-European roots).]

res′cu·a·ble adj.
res′cu·er n.

rescue

(ˈrɛskjuː)
vb (tr) , -cues, -cuing or -cued
1. to bring (someone or something) out of danger, attack, harm, etc; deliver or save
2. (Law) to free (a person) from legal custody by force
3. (Law) law to seize (goods or property) by force
n
4.
a. the act or an instance of rescuing
b. (as modifier): a rescue party.
5. (Law) the forcible removal of a person from legal custody
6. (Law) law the forcible seizure of goods or property
[C14: rescowen, from Old French rescourre, from re- + escourre to pull away, from Latin excutere to shake off, from quatere to shake]
ˈrescuable adj
ˈrescuer n

res•cue

(ˈrɛs kyu)

v. -cued, -cu•ing,
n. v.t.
1. to free from confinement or danger.
2. to take by forcible means from lawful custody.
n.
3. the act of rescuing.
[1300–50; Middle English rescouen, rescuwen < Old French rescou-, s. of rescourre=re- re- + escourre to shake, drive out, remove]
res′cu•a•ble, adj.
res′cu•er, n.

Rescue

 

deus ex machina An eleventh-hour deliverer, a last-minute rescuer; any contrived or unlikely means used to resolve a problem or untangle the intricacies of a plot. Literally ‘a god from a machine,’ this expression owes its origin to the ancient literary device of relying on divine intervention in the resolution of a plot. The machine in the phrase refers to a special piece of stage equipment used in ancient Greek theaters to lower actors playing the roles of gods onto the stage.

get [someone] off the hook To rescue a person from a difficult situation, particularly one involving trouble or embarrassment; to exonerate, clear, or vindicate; to absolve of responsibility. This expression refers to the plight of a fish that is hooked by a fisherman. If the fish is able to escape without help, it is by getting off the hook and swimming to freedom. Thus, to get [someone] off the hook is to extricate him from a potentially ruinous predicament.

“It’s an idea,” said Dr. Craig … “It would get Hartley off the hook, sure enough.” (J. Potts, Go, Lovely Rose, 1954)

pull out of a hat See SOLUTION.

pull out of the fire To extricate from danger, to save from destruction; to rescue or salvage; to turn threatened defeat into victory. Used in reference to plans, projects, situations, relationships, etc.—virtually anything that can be in jeopardy—the expression’s derivation is obvious.

saved by the bell Delivered from an undesirable fate by a lucky accident or intervention. The reference is to the bell which signals the end of a round of boxing. At that instant, even if the referee is in the middle of counting out a prostrate fighter, the round is officially over and the count is void, thus giving a losing contestant a reprieve. The expression is used when a doorbell, telephone bell, or other ringing interrupts a potentially unpleasant or embarrassing situation.

rescue


Past participle: rescued
Gerund: rescuing

Imperative
rescue
rescue
Present
I rescue
you rescue
he/she/it rescues
we rescue
you rescue
they rescue
Preterite
I rescued
you rescued
he/she/it rescued
we rescued
you rescued
they rescued
Present Continuous
I am rescuing
you are rescuing
he/she/it is rescuing
we are rescuing
you are rescuing
they are rescuing
Present Perfect
I have rescued
you have rescued
he/she/it has rescued
we have rescued
you have rescued
they have rescued
Past Continuous
I was rescuing
you were rescuing
he/she/it was rescuing
we were rescuing
you were rescuing
they were rescuing
Past Perfect
I had rescued
you had rescued
he/she/it had rescued
we had rescued
you had rescued
they had rescued
Future
I will rescue
you will rescue
he/she/it will rescue
we will rescue
you will rescue
they will rescue
Future Perfect
I will have rescued
you will have rescued
he/she/it will have rescued
we will have rescued
you will have rescued
they will have rescued
Future Continuous
I will be rescuing
you will be rescuing
he/she/it will be rescuing
we will be rescuing
you will be rescuing
they will be rescuing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been rescuing
you have been rescuing
he/she/it has been rescuing
we have been rescuing
you have been rescuing
they have been rescuing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been rescuing
you will have been rescuing
he/she/it will have been rescuing
we will have been rescuing
you will have been rescuing
they will have been rescuing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been rescuing
you had been rescuing
he/she/it had been rescuing
we had been rescuing
you had been rescuing
they had been rescuing
Conditional
I would rescue
you would rescue
he/she/it would rescue
we would rescue
you would rescue
they would rescue
Past Conditional
I would have rescued
you would have rescued
he/she/it would have rescued
we would have rescued
you would have rescued
they would have rescued
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.rescue - recovery or preservation from loss or dangerrescue - recovery or preservation from loss or danger; "work is the deliverance of mankind"; "a surgeon's job is the saving of lives"
recovery, retrieval - the act of regaining or saving something lost (or in danger of becoming lost)
lifesaving - saving the lives of drowning persons; "he took a course in lifesaving"
redemption, salvation - (theology) the act of delivering from sin or saving from evil
reclamation, reformation - rescuing from error and returning to a rightful course; "the reclamation of delinquent children"
salvage - the act of rescuing a ship or its crew or its cargo from a shipwreck or a fire
salvage - the act of saving goods or property that were in danger of damage or destruction
salvation - saving someone or something from harm or from an unpleasant situation; "the salvation of his party was the president's major concern"
search and rescue mission - a rescue mission to search for survivors and to rescue them
Verb1.rescue - free from harm or evil
salvage, salve, save, relieve - save from ruin, destruction, or harm
reprieve - relieve temporarily
bring through, carry through, pull through, save - bring into safety; "We pulled through most of the victims of the bomb attack"
2.rescue - take forcibly from legal custody; "rescue prisoners"
take - take by force; "Hitler took the Baltic Republics"; "The army took the fort on the hill"

rescue

verb
1. save, get out, save the life of, extricate, free, release, deliver, recover, liberate, set free, save (someone's) bacon (Brit. informal) Helicopters rescued nearly 20 people.
save leave, lose, abandon, desert, strand, leave behind
2. salvage, save, deliver, redeem, come to the rescue of He rescued a 14th century barn from demolition.
noun

rescue

verb
1. To extricate, as from danger or confinement:
Idiom: come to the rescue of.
2. To extricate from an undesirable state:
noun
Extrication from danger or confinement:
Translations
záchranazachránitzáchranná akce
redderedningredningsaktionundsætning
pelastaapelastuspelastuslentovapauttaapelastaminen
spašavanjespasiti
bjargabjörgun
救う救助
구조구조하다
gelbėjimasgelbėtiišgelbėjimasišgelbėti
glābšanaglābtizglābšanaizglābt
záchranná akcia
rešitevrešiti
räddaräddning
การช่วยชีวิตช่วยเหลือ
cứusự cứu nguy

rescue

[ˈreskjuː]
A. Nrescate m, salvamento m
the hero of the rescue wasel héroe del rescate or salvamento fue ...
to come/go to sb's rescueacudir en auxilio de algn, socorrer a algn
to the rescue!¡al socorro!
Batman to the rescue!¡Batman acude a la llamada!
B. VTsalvar, rescatar
three men were rescuedse salvaron tres hombres
they waited three days to be rescuedesperaron tres días hasta ser rescatados
to rescue sb from deathsalvar a algn de la muerte
the rescued man is in hospitalel hombre rescatado está en el hospital
C. CPD rescue attempt Ntentativa f de salvamento, tentativa f de rescate
rescue dig Nexcavación f de urgencia
rescue operations NPLoperaciones fpl de salvamento, operaciones fpl de rescate
rescue package N (Pol, Comm) → paquete m de medidas urgentes
rescue party Nequipo m de salvamento, equipo m de rescate
rescue services NPLservicios mpl de rescate, servicios mpl de salvamento
rescue team N = rescue party rescue vessel Nbuque m de salvamento
rescue work Noperación f de salvamento, operación f de rescate

rescue

[ˈrɛskjuː]
n
(= help) → secours mpl; (from shipwreck, earthquake)sauvetage m
to come to sb's rescue → venir au secours de qn
He came to my rescue → Il est venu à mon secours.
(also rescue operation) → opération m de sauvetage
a major air-sea rescue → une opération majeure de sauvetage air-mer
[company, business] → sauvetage m
vt
[+ person] → secourir, sauver
Sixty passengers were rescued → Soixante passagers ont été secourus., Soixante passagers ont été sauvés.
to rescue sb from sth → sauver qn de qch
[+ company, business] → sauver
modif
[aircraft, boat, helicopter, crew, dog] → de secours
a mountain rescue team → une équipe de sauvetage en montagne
rescue attempt → opération f de sauvetage rescue party, rescue services, rescue worker
(FINANCE) [deal, package, plan] → de sauvetagerescue party n (gen)équipe f de secours (SKIING, CLIMBING)colonne f de secours

rescue

n (= saving)Rettung f; (= freeing)Errettung f, → Befreiung f; rescue was difficultdie Rettung war schwierig; to go/come to somebody’s rescuejdm zu Hilfe kommen; to the rescue!zu Hilfe!; it was Bob to the rescueBob war unsere/seine etc Rettung; rescue attempt/operation/partyRettungsversuch m/-aktion f/-mannschaft f ? air-sea rescue
vt (= save)retten; (= free)erretten, befreien; you rescued me from a difficult situationdu hast mich aus einer schwierigen Lage gerettet; the rescued were taken to hospitaldie Geretteten wurden ins Krankenhaus gebracht

rescue

[ˈrɛskjuː]
1. n (saving) → salvataggio; (help) → soccorso
to come/go to sb's rescue → venire/andare in aiuto a or di qn
2. vtsalvare

rescue

(ˈreskjuː) verb
to get or take out of a dangerous situation, captivity etc. The lifeboat was sent out to rescue the sailors from the sinking ship.
noun
(an) act of rescuing or state of being rescued. The lifeboat crew performed four rescues last week; After his rescue, the climber was taken to hospital; They came quickly to our rescue.
ˈrescuer noun

rescue

إنْقاذ, يُنْقِذُ záchrana, zachránit redde, redning retten, Rettung διασώζω, διάσωση rescatar, rescate pelastaa, pelastus rescousse, secourir spašavanje, spasiti salvataggio, soccorrere 救う, 救助 구조, 구조하다 redden, redding redde, redningsaksjon ratunek, uratować resgatar, resgate, salvamento, salvar спасать, спасение rädda, räddning การช่วยชีวิต, ช่วยเหลือ kurtarma, kurtarmak cứu, sự cứu nguy 援救

res·cue

v. salvar, rescatar, librar;
___methodmétodo de ___, de salvamento.

rescue

n rescate m, salvamento; air — rescate aéreo; — inhaler inhalador m de rescate; vt rescatar, salvar
References in classic literature ?
A key is thrown in, which unlocks the door, and in a spasm of rapture he tears off his chains and rushes away to find and rescue his lady love.
We will go to look at the overturned trees and then we'll hurry on to camp to get the rescue party.
More than once they put their wits together to rescue some unfortunate farmer from the clutches of Wick Cutter, the Black Hawk money-lender.
The first generous impulse of Duncan was to rush to the rescue of the hapless wretch; but he felt himself bound to the spot by the iron grasp of the immovable scout.
Thorndike was halted, but the first tipstaff came to his rescue.
As he still nervously retained the two hands he had grasped, this would have been a difficult feat, even had he not endeavored at the same moment, by a backward furtive kick, to propel the hat out of the window, at which she laughingly broke from his grasp and flew to the rescue.
It would be so easy to throw up the window, and send forth a shriek, at the strange agony of which everybody would come hastening to the rescue, well understanding it to be the cry of a human soul, at some dreadful crisis
In fine, Hester Prynne resolved to meet her former husband, and do what might be in her power for the rescue of the victim on whom he had so evidently set his gripe.
The country-side swarmed to the rescue, and the family were saved, with one exception, the master.
It was a common trick with the boys--particularly if a stranger was present--to pretend a cramp and howl for help; then when the stranger came tearing hand over hand to the rescue, the howler would go on struggling and howling till he was close at hand, then replace the howl with a sarcastic smile and swim blandly away, while the town boys assailed the dupe with a volley of jeers and laughter.
They raged around Sid like a hail-storm; and before Aunt Polly could collect her surprised faculties and sally to the rescue, six or seven clods had taken personal effect, and Tom was over the fence and gone.
Nothing of the sort had ever occurred before to any young ladies in the place, within her memory; no rencontre, no alarm of the kind;and now it had happened to the very person, and at the very hour, when the other very person was chancing to pass by to rescue her